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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Estelle (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
08.11.10
 
August 11, 2010

Estelle's remnants merging with the low at 11:30 a.m. EDT and they appear as large broken areas of clouds. > View larger image
The GOES-11 satellite captured a visible image of Estelle's remnants merging with the low at 11:30 a.m. EDT and they appear as large broken areas of clouds far south of Baja California.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
Estelle's Remnant Low Going Out Kicking

Estelle has diminished and is now a remnant low pressure system in the Eastern Pacific. GOES-11 Satellite imagery from the late morning on August 11 showed a large area of cloudiness that includes Estelle's remnants and a low pressure area nearby, that were kicking up high waves in the region.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-11 captured a visible image of Estelle's remnants merging with the low at 1530 UTC (11:30 a.m. EDT) and they appear as large broken areas of clouds far south of Baja California. Estelle is not distinguishable from the nearby low. The GOES image was created by NASA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA.

Estelle's remnants are expected to merge with the nearby low pressure area. The low showed a burst of scattered moderate to strong convection earlier today (August 11) in its western quadrant. The merge of Estelle and the low is forecast to occur over the next day or so, as the merged system continues to drift eastward. Meanwhile, southwesterly winds in that area are between 22 and 27 mph and are kicking up 8 to 10 foot-high seas. That means that Estelle is going out "kicking."

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 10, 2010

On August 9 Estelle's main areas of convection and thunderstorms were in two separate areas (purple and blue). > View larger image
NASA AIRS imagery on August 9 at 2105 UTC (5:05 p.m. EDT) showed Estelle's main areas of convection and thunderstorms were in two separate areas (purple and blue). Later on August 9 only one of those areas continued to show deep convection.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Imagery Shows Limited Convection in Tropical Depression Estelle

Satellite imagery from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, or AIRS instrument, captured at 5:05 p.m. EDT on August 9 showed Estelle's main areas of convection and thunderstorms were in two separate areas, indicating the circulation has weakened because of the wind shear it has encountered. Since then, Estelle has weakened to a tropical depression. That wind shear is also affecting the second low in the eastern Pacific behind Estelle.

At 900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) on August 10, Tropical Depression Estelle had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph and continues to weaken. Estelle is located about 445 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California near 17.4 North and 113.4 West. Estelle was moving toward the southwest near 2 mph and has a minimum central pressure of 1005 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted that Estelle has only shown one small burst of deep convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) later in the evening of August 9 (after NASA's AIRS image was captured). Southeasterly vertical wind shear continues to batter Estelle, and the system is expected to weaken into a remnant low pressure area later today.

NASA's AIRS instrument flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite and provides infrared imagery. AIRS Infrared imagery is false-colored and helps identify the coldest (and highest) cloud tops in thunderstorms, and warm sea surface temperatures. In NASA AIRS imagery, higher cloud tops of stronger storms are depicted in purple. Those highest thunderstorms are as cold as or colder than 220 Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit. Lower, warmer cloud tops are false-colored in blue. NASA's AIRS imagery is managed out of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Ca.

AIRS imagery helps forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. take a look inside tropical cyclones and see where the strongest areas of convection are occurring. Today's AIRS imagery revealed limited convection in Estelle, and indicates a weakening storm. By Wednesday, Estelle is expected to become a remnant low pressure area in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

The second area of low pressure in the Eastern Pacific, located to the southeast of Estelle is also being affected by the wind shear battering Estelle. The low is about 200 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico and is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Because of the wind shear, the National Hurricane Center gives the low a 20 percent chance of development into a tropical cyclone over the next 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 9, 2010

MODIS Image captured on August 8, when Estelle was a robust tropical storm and appeared as a compact mass of clouds. > View larger image
This NASA MODIS Image of Estelle was captured at 1:20 p.m. PDT (20:20 UTC) on August 8, when Estelle was a robust tropical storm and appeared as a compact mass of clouds.
Credit: NASA/Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Tropical Storm Estelle Weakening in the Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Estelle is being battered by a southeasterly wind shear today, August 9, and satellite imagery indicates that her thunderstorms have moved west from her center. The southeasterly wind shear has weakened Estelle's winds down to 40 mph, barely a tropical storm.

Because wind shear is expected to increase over the next couple of days in the vicinity of Estelle, the National Hurricane Center expects Estelle to weaken to a depression and then a remnant low pressure area in a day or two. Visible satellite imagery from early today also showed that Estelle has a weak low-level circulation.

When Estelle was a robust tropical storm at 1:20 p.m. PDT (20:20 UTC) on August 8, NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a natural-color image of Tropical Storm Estelle. At that time, Estelle appeared as a compact cloud mass with a few disconnected bands of clouds along its perimeter. Along the storm’s northeastern margin, a band of clouds casts shadows toward the northeast.

By 11 a.m. EDT on August 9, Estelle was holding onto those maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. It was located about 390 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near 17.7 North and 112.3 West. It was crawling 3 mph toward the west and had a minimum central pressure of 1004 millibars.

Tropical Storm Estelle strengthened from a tropical depression over the eastern Pacific Ocean on August 6, 2010. By 2:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time on August 8, the storm had maximum sustained winds of 65 mph, and by August 10, she is headed for "tropical depression."

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



Estelle appears as a small swirl of clouds in the far left of the image, while the low is associated with all of the clouds behind it. > View larger image
The GOES-11 satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Estelle and the low pressure area that formed to her southeast (lower right) on August 9 at 9:45 a.m. EDT. Estelle appears as a small swirl of clouds in the far left of the image, while the low is associated with all of the clouds behind it.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
Tropical Storm Estelle is Getting "Wobbly" on GOES-11 Satellite Imagery

Tropical Storm Estelle is in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific, and it appears that she's getting a little "wobbly" on the latest GOES-11 Satellite imagery created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Estelle's forecast track projects that she'll keep slowly wobbling in her path over the next couple of days.

The GOES-11 satellite captured an image August 9 at 1345 UTC (9:45 a.m. EDT) of Tropical Storm Estelle and a low pressure area that formed to her southeast. Estelle appears in the GOES-11 satellite imagery as a small swirl of clouds, while a broad area of low located to her southeast is associated with a large area of clouds. Forecasters are watching that low for future development because of its closer proximity to the coast.

Estelle was born out of Tropical Depression 7-E at 5 p.m. EDT on Friday, August 7. By 5 a.m. EDT on August 9, Estelle was located about 385 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California so she poses no threat to land. That puts her center near 17.7 North and 112.1 West. Estelle is moving west at about 5 mph, but is expected to turn west-southwest later today or tonight then southeast, almost making a loop. Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph, and minimum central pressure is near 1001 millibars.

The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, and GOES stands for Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. GOES-13 watches the eastern half of the U.S. and the Atlantic, while GOES-11 watches weather over the western half of the U.S. and eastern Pacific Ocean. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA Goddard in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations from both GOES-11 and GOES-13 satellite data.

Although Estelle poses no threat to land, the second area of low pressure located southeast of Estelle is closer to the Mexican coast and forecasters are keeping an eye on it. The large area of disturbed weather is visible on satellite imagery that extends from the south of Acapulco, Mexico westward for several hundred miles. This is a broad area of low pressure that has disorganized showers, so any development will be slow to occur. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. gives the low a 10% chance of development in the next two days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 6, 2010

The GOES-11 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression 7E off the western Mexico coast on August 6. > View larger image
The GOES-11 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression 7E (appearing as the large swirl of clouds right/center) off the western Mexico coast on Friday, August 6 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT).
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-11 Catches Seventh Tropical Depression in Eastern Pacific

GOES-11, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression 7E today, August 6, as it continues to move away from the Mexican west coast. Forecasters expect 7E to strengthen over the weekend, if it becomes a tropical storm it would get the name "Estelle."

The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, but the NASA GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. provides satellite images and animations from the GOES satellites. Forecasters have noticed during the morning hours on August 6, that there has been growing convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power tropical cyclones) near the center of TD7E. That's an indication of a strengthening storm.

Tropical Depression 7E (TD7E) formed at 11 p.m. EDT on August 5 and by 11 a.m. EDT on August 6, it was located about 165 miles south of Manzanillo, Mexico. That's near 16.6 North and 104.0 West. It continues to bring heavy rainfall and gusty winds to coastal areas in southwestern Mexico, and between 3 to 5 inches of rainfall is expected before TD7E moves farther away from land. Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph, and TD7E's minimum central pressure is near 1004 millibars. It is moving to the west-northwest near 10 mph.

The National Hurricane Center noted that "the depression is likely to become a tropical storm later today and additional strengthening is expected over the weekend." The direction that TD7E is headed (into the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean) is a favorable environment with warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear, which will very likely allow TD7E to strengthen into Tropical Storm Estelle over the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center