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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Chaba (Northwestern Pacific)
11.01.10
 
November 1, 2010

TRMM Satellite Caught Typhoon Chaba's Heavy Rainfall on Its Approach to Japan

TRMM rainfall data indicated that Chaba's heaviest rainfall was located to the north-west of the Chaba's distinct eye › View larger image
TRMM rainfall data indicated that Chaba's heaviest rainfall of over 50 mm/hr ( ~2 inches) were located to the north-west of the Chaba's distinct eye and south-east of the Japanese island of Okinawa on Oct. 28 at 1053 UTC as it approached Japan.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Typhoon Chaba is forecast to brush the eastern side of the main island of Japan this weekend, and NASA's Terra satellite captured an impressive visual image of the storm today as it continues northeastward through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 29, Typhoon Chaba's maximum sustained winds were now at 80 knots (92 mph) down from 100 knots (115 mph) just 24 hours before. It was about 460 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan near 29.9 North and 134.9 East. It was moving northeast near 16 knots (18 mph) and kicking up 23-foot high waves.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 29 at 02:10 UTC (Oct. 28 at 10:10 p.m. EDT) when it was over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite revealed that deep convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) was steadily decreasing in Chaba today, Oct. 29, and the storm is starting to elongate in the northeastern quadrant. Any time a storm starts to elongate it loses energy.

Chaba's center of circulation is now forecast to stay at sea over the weekend, however, Toyko will feel the effects of the fringe of Chaba's winds and rains.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



October 29, 2010

NASA's Terra Satellite Sees a Weaker Typhoon Chaba

MODIS captured this visible image of Typhoon Chaba over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 29 at 02:10 UTC when it was over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
On Oct. 28 the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew over Typhoon Chaba from its vantage point in space and saw heavy rain falling in the storm as it was approaching Japan. Chaba stayed off-shore when it passed Toyko this weekend.

TRMM passed over Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 28 at 1053 UTC (6:53 a.m. EDT ), two days before it passed by Toyko. Upon its approach to the big island of Japan, Chaba had intensified to a category four storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale with sustained winds estimated at 115 kts (~132 mph) but had weakened slightly.

TRMM rainfall measurements were derived from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR), and revealed that the heaviest amounts of over 50 mm/hr ( ~2 inches) were located to the north-west of the Chaba's distinct eye and south-east of the Japanese island of Okinawa. TRMM is managed by both NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA.

On Oct. 30 at 11 p.m. local time/Japan, Chaba's winds had weakened to 27 mph (45 km/hour) and its center stayed off-shore as it continued tracking northeastward in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. The Izu Island chain reported between 1.2 and 2 inches (30-50 millimeters) of rain per hour on Oct. 29 from Chaba.

Chaba has since been downgraded into a remnant low pressure area.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



October 28, 2010

NASA Gets an Infrared Look at Typhoon Chaba's 40-mile Wide Eye

AIRS captured an infrared image clearly showing Chaba's cloudless eye. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 28 at 04:35 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) and its Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured and infrared image clearly showing Chaba's cloudless eye. The images showed high, cold, thunderstorm cloud tops (purple) as cold as -63F.
Credit: NASA/JPL Ed Olsen
MODIS took a visible image of Typhoon Chaba centered over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite took a visible image of Typhoon Chaba five minutes after the AIRS image was captured. At that time, Chaba's center was over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. At 04:40 UTC: Typhoon Chaba (16W) over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan.
Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
TRMM showed that Chaba was very well organized and covered a large area with moderate to heavy rainfall. › View larger image
The TRMM satellite captured an image of Typhoon Chaba on Oct.26 at 1104 UTC (7:04 a.m. EDT) and showed that Chaba was very well organized and covered a large area with moderate to heavy rainfall (red) falling at up to 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
The eye of a tropical cyclone or hurricane actually gives forecasters a good "look" into the strength of a storm. Today, NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of powerful Typhoon Chaba and clearly showed a 40 mile-wide eye indicating a powerful storm.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 28 at 04:35 UTC (12:35 a.m. EDT) and its Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured and infrared image clearly showing Chaba's cloudless eye. The image also revealed high, cold, thunderstorm cloud tops as cold as -63F as they dumped heavy rains over the Philippine Sea. AIRS provided forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center some valuable infrared data on Chaba's cloud top temperatures. Those temperatures are important because they tell forecasters how high thunderstorms are, and the higher the thunderstorm, the more powerful the tropical cyclone.

Another instrument onboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image of this large storm. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) took a visible image of Typhoon Chaba five minutes after the AIRS image was captured. At that time, Chaba's center was over the Ryukyu Islands, Japan.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Typhoon Chaba on Oct.26 at 1104 UTC (7:04 a.m. EDT). The overlaid rainfall analysis from TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) showed that Chaba was very well organized and covered a large area with moderate to heavy rainfall. No well defined eye was shown by TRMM data but the center was made apparent with bands of rainfall around the center of Chaba's circulation.

On Oct. 28 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Chaba had maximum sustained 110 knots (126 mph). It was centered about 130 nautical miles east-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 26.2 North and 130 .5 East. It was moving northeast at 14 mph and creating 32-foot high waves.

Chaba is forecast to continue moving northeast and is presently at peak strength, according to forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Chaba is expected to be an extra-tropical storm before reaching mainland Japan on Oct. 30, and is now expected to move just east of Tokyo with the center remaining at sea.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD























October 27, 2010

NASA Sees Typhoon Chaba's Center at Sea But Clouds Extend Much Farther

Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Chaba revealing its extensive clouds. › View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Chaba in the Philippine Sea on Oct. 27 at 02:25 UTC, revealing its extensive clouds.
Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team
The center of powerful Typhoon Chaba is still in the open waters of the Philippine Sea, but the cloud cover associated with the typhoon appears to go much farther in NASA satellite imagery.

NASA's Terra satellite flew over Typhoon Chaba on Oct. 27 at 02:25 UTC (Oct. 26 at 10:25 p.m. EDT), and captured a visible image of its cloud cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. The MODIS image showed that some of the clouds associated with Chaba stretch as far south as the Philippines, as far west as Taiwan, and as far north as southern Japan.

Shortly afterward, infrared satellite imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite revealed an eye that is 12 nautical miles.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Oct. 27, Typhoon Chaba had maximum sustained winds near 110 knots (126 mph). Tropical Storm-force winds of 39 mph or higher were occurring within 155 to 170 miles of the center, making the storm's reach about 340 miles in diameter. Hurricane-force winds of 74 mph or higher extended out to 45 miles from the center.

Chaba's center was about 240 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 22.7 North and 128.1 East, but its clouds extended far past Kadena into the southern part of the main island of Japan. Chaba was moving north near 8 mph and generating waves near 25 feet high in the Philippine Sea.

Today, Chaba will maintain its intensity because it is in an area of low vertical wind shear and good outflow. However by 11 p.m. EDT on Oct. 27, as it approaches a strong polar jet stream vertical wind shear will increase and Chaba is forecast to weaken on its way to mainland Japan.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



October 26, 2010

AIRS image of Chaba› View larger image
This infrared image of Typhoon Chaba's clouds was captured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on October 26 at 04:47 UTC (12:47 a.m. EDT). The coldest, strongest, highest thunderstorm cloud tops appear in purple (as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit). Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Shows Strengthening in Typhoon Chaba

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Typhoon Chaba early this morning and captured visible and infrared images of its clouds revealing a well-organized and strengthening typhoon.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Aqua captured a visible image of Typhoon Chaba on October 26 at 04:50 UTC (12:50 a.m. EDT), as it moved through the Philippine Sea. To see the MODIS image, visit: http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/gallery/?2010299-1026/Chaba.A2010299.0450. Chaba is a large storm that stretches from the southern Philippines north to the Okinawa province of Japan.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Typhoon Chaba's clouds three minutes before the MODIS instrument captured a visible image. The coldest, strongest, highest thunderstorm cloud tops were as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit. Comparisons of infrared image over the six hour period between 12:50 a.m. EDT and 6:50 a.m. EDT showed a sharp increase in colder cloud tops around the low-level circulation center of Chaba, indicating the storm is strengthening quickly.

At 11 a.m. EDT on Oct. 26, Typhoon Chaba had maximum sustained winds near 75 knots (86 mph). It was about 430 nautical miles south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Japan near 20.4 North and 128.1 East. It was moving northwestward near 5 knots (6 mph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts Chaba to pass just to the east of Kadena Air Base late in the early morning hours of Oct. 29 local time, Kadena/Toyko Time (late in the evening of Oct. 28 EDT). Chaba is then forecast to track northeast and make landfall in Japan between Kyoto and Toyko at night local time on Oct. 30 (morning hours EDT).

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



October 25, 2010

NASA Infrared Imagery Sees Tropical Storm Chaba Grow from Tropical Depression 16W

Chaba's coldest cloud tops indicated strong convection around the south and western edges of the center. › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Chaba on Sunday, Oct. 24 at 17:11 UTC (1:11 p.m. EDT) and captured this infrared image of the storm's cold cloud tops. Chaba's coldest cloud tops were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit (purple) indicating strong convection around the south and western edges of the center.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 16W in the Pacific Northwest grew into Tropical Storm Chaba over the past weekend, infrared imagery from NASA revealed powerful thunderstorms around Chaba's center.

Tropical Storm Chaba is now located about 525 nautical miles south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan.

On October 25 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Chaba had maximum sustained winds near 60 knots (xx mph). It was still in open waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, near 18.3 North and 129.7 East. It was moving northwestward near 9 mph, and generating 19 foot-high seas.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Chaba on Sunday, Oct. 24 at 17:11 UTC (1:11 p.m. EDT) and captured an infrared image of the storm's cold cloud tops with th e Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. At that time, Chaba's coldest cloud tops were as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit indicating strong convection around the south and western edges of the center. The colder the thunderstrorm cloud tops, the higher the storms, and the stronger the thunderstorms.

Water vapor satellite imagery showed banding of thunderstorms with deep convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power a tropical cyclone) along the southern and western edges of the center of circulation. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts Chaba to continue intensifying as the wind shear decreases over the next couple of days.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD



October 22, 2010

NASA Sees Tropical Depression 16W in NW Pacific's Open Waters

Image of Tropical Depression 16W's cold thunderstorms was taken from NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 21. › view larger image
This infrared image of Tropical Depression 16W's cold (purple and blue) thunderstorms was taken from NASA's Aqua satellite on Oct. 21 at 1641 UTC (12:41 p.m. EDT). The purple areas indicate high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops colder than -65 Fahrenheit.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
The sixteenth tropical depression of the Northwestern Pacific hurricane season is over open waters this weekend and no threat to land. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data on the storm's cold clouds as it passed overhead from space.

Tropical Depression 16W's (TD16W) maximum sustained winds were near 29 mph on Oct. 22 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT). TD16W was about 755 nautical miles southeast of Kadena, Japan near 17.2 North and 136.7 East. It was moving westward near 13 mph, and generating waves 10 feet high.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument uses infrared technology to take a tropical cyclone's temperature. AIRS sits on NASA's Aqua satellite and captured an image of those cloud top temperatures of Tropical Depression 16 W on Oct. 21 at 1641 UTC (12:41 p.m. EDT) revealing some strong thunderstorms colder than -65 Fahrenheit, mostly south of the center.

Satellite data indicates that the low-level circulation center has been exposed to outside winds, and that's a hint that the storm could weaken more in the short term. The deepest or strongest convection (rapidly rising air that forms the thunderstorms that power the depression) are now south of the center of circulation.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center, the organization that forecasts tropical cyclones in that part of the world, noted that the upper level atmospheric conditions are forecast to improve within the next few days, which will allow TD16W to organize and intensify, assuming it holds together.

By mid-week next week the island of Kadena is expected to feel some of the depression's effects as it moves in that direction.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD


October 21, 2010

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees New Tropical Depression 16W in Western Pacific

Tropical Depression 16W over the Northern Marianas Islands and Guam on Oct. 20 at 15:59 UTC (11:59 a.m. EDT). › View larger image
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite shows the developing Tropical Depression 16W over the Northern Marianas Islands and Guam on Oct. 20 at 15:59 UTC (11:59 a.m. EDT). It has since moved west into the open waters of the Pacific.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over a low pressure area that was bringing some rain to the Northern Marianas Islands in the Pacific, and it has now strengthened into a tropical depression.

Tropical Depression 16W formed in the Western Pacific Ocean at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 2 about 460 nautical miles south of Iwo To, near 17.2 North and 140.9 East. It was moving northwestward near 5 mph, and had maximum sustained winds near 29 mph.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the low, it captured an image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that showed the developing Tropical Depression 16W over the Northern Marianas Islands and Guam on Oct. 20 at 15:59 UTC (11:59 a.m. EDT). It has since moved west into the open waters of the Pacific.

The depression is expected to strengthen because it is in an area of low wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. It will remain far south of Iwo To, and by Oct. 23 is forecast to start turning to the west-northwest.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD