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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Blas (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
06.22.10
 
June 22, 2010

Blas Gets the Blas, Now a Remnant

Once a tropical storm, now a remnant, Blas has the blahs. Tropically speaking that means that Blas is dissipating.

Blas is currently more than 750 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Blas was classified as a remnant low pressure area on June 21 by 5 p.m. EDT.

On June 22 at 6 a.m. EDT, the center of Blas' remnants was located near 16.8 North and 122.0 West. Despite the storm being downgraded, seas within 480 nautical miles of the area of the low's center are still ranging from 8 to 12 feet. Satellite data is showing that no strong convection and precipitation is associated with the remnant low, although some may flare up occasionally as Blas continues to fade in the next day.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 21, 2010

MODIS image of Blas and Celia > View larger image
On June 19 at 17:30 UTC (1:30 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Blas (left) and the newly developed Tropical Storm Celia (right).
Credit: NASA Goddard/MODIS Rapid Response Team
AIRS image of Blas and Celia > View larger image
On June 20 at 08:47 UTC (4:47 a.m. EDT), the AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of both Tropical Storm Blas (left) and Celia (right). The purple area represents more powerful convection and thunderstorms. Blas has less and Celia has more, which indicates Blas' weakening and Celia strengthening.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua and Terra Satellites View Tropical Storms Blas and Celia

Tropical cyclones Blas and Celia are both spinning in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and two NASA satellites captured them in visible and infrared imagery.

On June 19 at 17:30 UTC (1:30 p.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Blas when it was still a tropical storm and the newly developed Tropical Storm Celia. Celia formed on June 19 and by 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) had strengthened into a tropical storm. The storm was "born" about 355 miles south-southeast of Acapulco, Mexico, near 12.5 North and 97.1 West.

The following day, June 20 at 08:47 UTC (4:47 a.m. EDT), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of both Tropical Storm Blas and Celia. The infrared image measured the temperature of each cyclone's clouds, and the warm ocean waters that surround them.

The AIRS infrared image revealed that the convection in Blas was waning and the areas of strong convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms the thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone) were less than they were the day before.

Convection in Celia had increased and AIRS imagery revealed a larger area of strong convection than on June 19. The imagery showed very cold thunderstorm cloud tops (as cold as or colder than -63 degrees Fahrenheit). That increased area of high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops indicated that Celia was strengthening.

By the morning of June 21 (EDT), Blas had weakened further and is now a tropical depression with maximum sustained winds near 35 mph. Blas is located about 575 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 18.0 North and 117.1 West. Blas continues to move west around 12 mph (11 knots) further into open waters. Blas is forecast to dissipate sometime on June 22.

Meanwhile, Celia has continued to strengthen and is now a hurricane with maximum sustained winds near 80 mph (70 knots). Tropical-storm force winds extend out to 70 miles from the center, making the storm about 140 miles in diameter. Hurricane-force winds only extend out to 15 miles from Celia's center. Celia is located about 380 miles south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico near 11.8 North and 102.1 West. She's moving west at 9 mph (8 knots). Celia is no threat to land and will continue to move west, then west-northwest, farther away from land.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 18, 2010

AIRS image of Blas > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Blas on June 17 at 20:41 UTC (4:41 p.m. EDT) and it showed two areas of very high, frigid clouds (purple) in the northeastern and eastern areas of the storm.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Blas Bearing Bouts of Strong Convection in NASA Imagery

Tropical Storm Blas is on a west-northwesterly track in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and a NASA satellite flying overhead noticed some strong areas of convection in the storm.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm Blas on June 17 at 20:41 UTC (4:41 p.m. EDT) and captured an infrared image of the storm from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. The AIRS image showed two areas of very high, frigid clouds (as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit) in the northeastern and eastern areas of the storm. That strong convection shifted overnight to the southeastern region of the storm.

At 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Blas was located about 270 miles (440 kilometers) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico near 15.8 North and 106.7 West. It was moving west-northwest near 5 mph (4 knots). Blas' maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (35 knots), and its estimated minimum central pressure is near 1000 millibars. Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) mainly to the southeast of the center.

The National Hurricane Center noted in their discussion on the morning of June 18, "Numerous [areas of] strong convection appears within 90 nautical miles of center over the southern semicircle. Scattered moderate/isolated strong convection is within 30 nm of a line from 16 North and 107 West to 17 North and 110 West."

During the overnight hours from June 17 to June 18, Blas convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms clouds and thunderstorms) has weakened. By the early morning hours of June 18, the convection in the storm had deepened quickly.

Over the weekend of June 19 and 20, Blas is forecast to change very little in strength while continuing to track to the west-northwest in open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 17, 2010

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of TD2E hugging the coast of western Mexico, center, and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas that appears as a half circle, left. > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of TD2-E hugging the coast of western Mexico (small rounded area, center) and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas that appears as a half circle (left). Both have high, strong thunderstorms in their center (purple).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 2-E Struggling, While Tropical Storm Blas is Born

NASA infrared satellite imagery captured two tropical depressions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean today, as one struggles to survive and the other powered up into Tropical Storm Blas.

On June 17 at 08:11 UTC (4:11 a.m. EDT/1:11 PDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 2-E (TD2-E) hugging the coast of western Mexico and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas which is farther west and in open waters. Both have high, strong thunderstorms in their center. The AIRS image indicates strong convection, with cloud top temperatures as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit.

Tropical Depression 2-E in the Eastern Pacific is close to land and although it is having difficultly strengthening it is still bringing a lot of rain to the western Mexican coast to the states of Oxaca and southern Guerrero. At 5 a.m. PDT (8 a.m. EDT) TD2-E still had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph, as it did 24 hours before. It was located near 15.6 North and 98.0 West, about 60 miles (100 km) west-southwest of Puerto Escondido, Mexico, or 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Punto Maldonado, Mexico. TD2-E is moving at 9 mph (15 km/hr) toward the west-northwest, and has a minimum central pressure of 1008 millibars.

Heavy rainfall is the main threat from this system. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Salina Cruz to Acapulco, Mexico and a tropical storm watch in in effect for areas west of Acapulco to Zihuatanejo. TD2-E is expected to continue moving north-northwest along the coast for the next day or two, continuing its rainy assault over land.

TD2-E is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches along the coast of the state of Oaxaca and southern Guerrero, with possible isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches. These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT) on June 17, the third tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season was born. By 11:40 a.m. EDT (8:40 a.m. PDT) Tropical Depression 3-E (TD3-E) had strengthened into Tropical Storm Blas with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph and is expected to strengthen more over the next 48 hours. It is currently located about 265 miles (425 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, near 15.3 North latitude and 105.3 West longitude. It is moving northeast near 2 mph (4 km/hr) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1006 millibars. There are no coastal warnings in effect for this tropical storm.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center