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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Bandu (Northern Indian Ocean)
05.24.10
 
May 24, 10

Thermal image of Tropical Cyclone Bandu › View larger image
On May 22 at 22:29 UTC (6:29 p.m. EDT) NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying aboard the NASA Aqua satellite captured a small area of cold clouds (blue) associated the remnants of Bandu.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Bandu Begone: Tropical Cyclone 2A Fading in Somalia

Early on Saturday, May 22, Tropical Storm 02A moved into the Gulf of Aden and was named "Bandu." At that time, Bandu had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph) and was 50 miles north-northwest of Cape Guardafui, Somalia. NASA's Aqua satellite recently captured Bandu's fading thunderstorms over inland Somalia.

Before 24 hours had elapsed, Bandu had already dissipated because of cooler waters, higher wind shear and drier air in the Gulf of Aden. It curved southwest and made landfall in northeast Somalia. On May 22 at 22:29 UTC (6:29 p.m. EDT) NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying aboard the NASA Aqua satellite captured a small area of cold clouds associated the remnants of Bandu. AIRS measures cloud-top temperatures and noticed the remnants over the Sool and Puntland regions of Somalia.

On Monday, May 24, the remnants of Bandu were still bringing showers to northeastern Somalia. Forecasts for the cities of Garowe and Las Anod call for widely scattered showers and thunderstorms with temperatures in the low 80s (Fahrenheit) as Bandu's remnants continue to dissipate. Garowe is the capital city of the Puntland administrative region of Somalia. Las Anod is the administrative capital of Sool region of Somalia.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



May 21, 2010

Satellite image of Tropical Storm 02A › View larger image
TRMM captured the image of Tropical Storm 02A's rainfall on May 20 at 7:30 p.m. EDT as it was entering the Gulf of Aden. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Light to Moderate Rainfall Seen in Gulf of Aden's Tropical Storm 02A

NASA analyzes rainfall from space using data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite, and in an overpass from late yesterday (May 20), rainfall in Tropical Storm 02A appeared light to moderate as the system was making its way from the Arabian Sea into the Gulf of Aden.

The latest TRMM satellite image, captured on May 20 at 7:30 p.m. EDT, revealed light to moderate rainfall within the storm. TRMM data estimated rainfall between .78 and 1.57 inches per hour within the storm.

Tropical cyclones are made up of hundreds of thunderstorms and TRMM measures intensity of rainfall from those thunderstorms from the vantage point of space. Making the satellite images is a complicated process. Rain rates are created from different instruments aboard TRMM. The rain rates in the center of TRMM images are derived from the TRMM Precipitation Radar, the only space borne radar of its kind, while those in the outer portion are from the TRMM Microwave Imager. The rain rates are then overlaid on infrared data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner to create the entire image. The images are created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Md.

On May 21 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm 02A had maximum sustained winds near 63 mph (55 knots) while over the mouth of the Gulf of Aden. It was about 50 nautical miles north-northeast of Cape Guardafui, Somalia, near 12.6 North and 51.4 East. It is moving in a west-southwesterly direction at 4 mph (3 knots).

Tropical Storm 2A is now entering an area of moderate wind shear, so the storm will start weakening as it makes a slow entrance into the Gulf. In addition to increased wind shear, 2A faces drier air moving in from the Somali Desert and cooler sea surface temperatures. Those are three factors that always lead to the weakening and demise of a tropical cyclone. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts 2A to dissipate in the latter part of the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



May 20, 2010

AIRS satellite image of Tropical Storm 02A › View larger image
This NASA infrared AIRS satellite image from May 19 revealed that Tropical Storm 02A has some stronger thunderstorms around its center (higher, stronger storms are depicted in purple).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Tropical Storm 02A's High Thunderstorms

NASA's Aqua satellite saw some strong thunderstorms in Tropical Storm 02A using infrared imagery, as it heads into the Gulf of Aden between Somalia and Yemen.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm 2A was packing maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph). Tropical storm-force winds extend out to 45 miles from the center. It is located near 12.6 North and 51.5 East in the Arabian Sea, passing by Cape Guardafui on the northeast tip of Somalia. It was moving in a west-northwest direction at 7 mph (6 knots), and moving into the Gulf of Aden. 2A's winds are kicking up waves in the Gulf of Aden and western Arabian Sea up to 15 feet high.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm 02A on May 19 at 21:59 UTC (5:59 p.m. EDT) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder known as the AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. The infrared image showed 02A has some stronger thunderstorms around its center. Additionally, the image showed warm waters of more than 80 degrees Fahrenheit (threshold for maintaining tropical cyclones) in the Gulf of Aden and western Arabian Sea. The imagery also showed much warmer land temperatures in Yemen to the storm's north.

Once 02A gets into the Gulf of Aden, forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expect the storm will strengthen for a brief period before it runs into wind shear, which is expected to weaken it.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



May 19, 2010

satellite image of Tropical Storm 02A › View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm 2A at 09:41 UTC (5:41 a.m. EDT) just as the storm was strengthening to tropical storm status. The visible image clearly shows higher thunderstorms around the center.
Credit: NASA/JPL/Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Second Tropical Storm Form Near the Horn of Africa

The Northern Indian Ocean cyclone season is off to a roaring start, as the second tropical storm formed within a day of the first one. NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Storm 02A today, May 19 and captured infrared, microwave and visible images of the storm.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on May 19, Tropical Storm 02A had maximum sustained winds near 39 mph, with higher gusts. It was located in the Arabian Sea (part of the Northern Indian Ocean) about 135 miles east-southeast of Cape Guardafui, Somalia. That's near 11.3 North and 53.5 East. It was moving west-northwest near 6 mph (5 knots).

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm 2A at 09:41 UTC (5:41 a.m. EDT) just as the storm was strengthening to tropical storm status. The visible image clearly shows higher thunderstorms around the center, and the western side of the storm over land.

Tropical Storm 02A is currently bringing gusty winds and rain to Bari, Somalia. Bari is an administrative region in northern Somalia where the major cities there are Bosaso, the capital and Qardho. Tropical Storm 02A is expected to track west-northwest and move into the Gulf of Aden, which lies just north of Somalia. Once there it is forecast to track in a westerly direction and bring rains and wind to Yemen, which lies to the north of the Gulf of Aden.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center note that increased wind shear will not allow the system to strengthen as it moves into the Gulf of Aden. It is expected to dissipate in several days.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.