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Hurricane Season 2010: System 97W (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
07.20.10
 
July 20, 2010

NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite detected strong convection (purple)in the center of System 97W. > View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite detected strong convection (purple)in the center of System 97W.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
System 97W Loses its Punch… Tropical Cyclone Now Unlikely

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center canceled its tropical disturbance update for System 97W that is sitting in the Yellow Sea. The convection associated with System 97W is only flaring up in small areas and development appears unlikely now. System 97W's low pressure center was located about 265 nautical miles south-southwest of Kunsan, South Korea, near 31.3 North and 123.8 East. Maximum sustained winds at 6 a.m. EDT (1000 UTC) on July 20 were near 11-17 mph (10-15 knots). Satellite data has confirmed that System 97W's low level center has been exposed for about 24 hours leaving the storm open for wind shear and drier air. In addition, System 97W is now moving north into cooler sea surface temperatures and increased vertical wind shear (winds that can tear a storm apart).

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



July 19, 2010

NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite detected strong convection (purple)in the center of System 97W. > View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite detected strong convection (purple)in the center of System 97W.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Infrared Satellite Imagery Sees System 97W Ripe for Tropical Development

When NASA's Aqua satellite flew over System 97W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on July 19 at 0417 UTC (12:17 a.m. EDT), it captured temperature data on some very high thunderstorms and strong convection happening inside. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center who utilize that data noted that System 97W has a good chance of becoming a tropical depression in the next 12 to 24 hours.

NASA's infrared satellite imagery was captured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument. The convection it detected in the center of System 97W was strong as evidenced by high, cold thunderstorm cloud tops, colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that System 97W's maximum sustained winds are estimated between 20 and 25 knots (23-28 mph). The center is estimated near 27.9 North and 125.0 East, which is about 175 nautical miles west-northwest of Okinawa, Japan. System 97W is moving northwest near 10 mph (9 knots).

System 97W is forecast to track northward into the Yellow Sea. The Yellow Sea is the name given to the northern part of the East China Sea (a marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean). The Yellow Sea is located between mainland China and the Korean peninsula.

As it continues northwest, System 97W could strengthen into a tropical depression before tracking over cool sea surface temperatures between 75-79 Fahrenheit (24-26 Celsius) after 24 hours. A tropical cyclone needs sea surface temperatures of at least 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26.5 C) to maintain intensity.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center