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Hurricane Season 2010: System 90W (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)
04.29.10
 
April 29, 2010

System 90W still has some stronger thunderstorms around its center on April 29 at 05:11 UTC. > View larger image
This NASA infrared AIRS satellite image shows System 90W still has some stronger thunderstorms around its center (higher, stronger storms are depicted in purple) on April 29 at 05:11 UTC.< br /> Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees System 90W Losing Its Punch

NASA satellite data has shown that System 90W is not developing into a tropical cyclone because the vertical wind shear has increased and it's battering the storm.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over System 90W on April 29 at 05:11 UTC (1:11 a.m. EDT) and noticed that the storm's center of circulation is now undefined. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center estimate that storm's "center" is located near 10.9 North and 116.3 East, about 355 nautical miles southwest of Manila, Philippines.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder known as the AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite showed deepening convection (rapidly rising air that forms clouds and thunderstorms) as the system moved closer to a mid-latitude trough (elongated area of low pressure). But that deepening or strengthening of convection is expected to be short lived because of the increasing winds battering the system.

The potential for System 90W to develop into a tropical cyclone has now dropped from "Fair" to "Poor" in the next 24 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



April 28, 2010

AIRS image of System 90W > View larger image
Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of System 90W on April 27 at 17:41 UTC and it showed highest clouds and thunderstorms (purple).
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees Most Showers in System 90W to North-northeast of Center

NASA's infrared satellite data revealed that the low pressure area called System 90W near the Philippines is still trying to get organized. Infrared satellite imagery pinpointed where the most high clouds and showers are around the storm's center.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies on the Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of System 90W's clouds and thunderstorms on April 27 at 17:41 UTC (1:41 p.m. EDT). The satellite imagery showed that the most convection and precipitation is to the north and northeast of the storm's circulation center. The imagery also shows curved convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms clouds and thunderstorms) around a weak, broad low level circulation center.

At 2:00 a.m. EDT today, April 28, System 90W was about 230 nautical miles northwest of Zamboanga, the Philippines. That puts the center near 9.6 North and 119.0 East. It was bringing rainfall to Ozamis City (in the province of Misamis Occidental), Pagadian City (in the province of Zamboanga del Sur), Cotabato City (in Mindanao), Iligan (north of the province of Lanao del Norte) and Marawi City (province of Lanao del Sur) and many more locations in those vicinities.

System 90W's maximum sustained winds were still between 15-20 knots (17-23 mph). Its minimum central pressure is near 1009 millibars.

System 90W is still in an area with weak vertical wind shear and very warm sea surface temperatures that will allow it to continue to develop. The potential for development in the next 24 hours remains fair.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



April 27, 2010

System 90W appears to be organizing; rounded area of clouds in the center appear to be high, strong thunderstorms. > View larger image
The MODIS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of System 90W on April 27 at 1:27 a.m. EDT, when it was 160 miles NW of Zamboanga, Philippines. It appears to be organizing. The rounded area of clouds in the center appear to be high, strong thunderstorms.
Credit: JTWC/NASA
System 90W Appears Ripe for Tropical Cyclone Development in Philippines

There's a tropical disturbance in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, about 160 miles northwest of Zamboanga in the Philippines. System 90W appears to be coming together as a tropical cyclone.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (or MODIS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of System 90W on April 27 at 1:27 a.m. EDT, when it was 160 miles NW of Zamboanga, Philippines. Zamboanga City is one of the primary hub of Airport and Seaport in the Philippines. It is also the largest city in the Philippines in terms of land area.

System 90W is already bringing rains to the cities of Narra (a municipality) and Brooke's Point (a first class municipality) in the province of Palawan, Philippines. Even Puerto Princesa City, a first class city and the capital of Palawan, is reporting rainfall from System 90W today.

System 90W's circulation center was near 8.9 North latitude and 120.2 West longitude over the Sulu Sea in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 15 to 20 knots (17-23 mph).

The low pressure area appears to be organizing and it is in an area of low vertical wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures. The small rounded area of clouds in the center appear to be high, strong thunderstorms. In addition to the MODIS imagery, multi-spectral satellite imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) shows curved convection around a weak low level circulation center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted in its forecast this morning that 90W has a fair chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next 24 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center