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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Storm Imani (Southern Indian Ocean)
03.24.10
 
March 24, 2010

MODIS image of Tropical Storm Imani › Larger Image
NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Imani on March 24 at 4:25 UTC, and it showed a storm with good symmetry, indicating that it is well-organized. The image even hinted of an eye forming in the storm's center. Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team

Map of the path of Tropical Storm Imani › Larger Image
This graphic from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center shows that Tropical Storm Imani's path over the last couple of days looks like a question mark. Credit: JTWC
Tropical Storm Imani Making a Question Mark in the Southern Indian Ocean

Over the last week, the path that Tropical Storm Imani, formerly tropical cyclone 21S, is making in the Southern Indian Ocean resembles a question mark. However, there is no question in the minds of forecasters that Imani is headed south to finish out the "question mark" shape.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured Tropical Storm Imani at 0425 UTC (12:25 a.m. EDT) today, when it was near the "middle of the question mark" track that it is taking. It showed a storm with good symmetry, indicating that it is well-organized. The image even hinted of an eye forming in the storm's center.

At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) today, March 24, Tropical Storm Imani had maximum sustained winds near 63 mph (55 knots). Tropical storm-force winds extended out up to 55 miles from the center, making the storm about 110 miles in diameter. It was located about 745 miles west-southwest of Cocos Island, near 15.7 south and 86.3 East. It was moving southwest near 13 mph (11 knots).

Imani has strengthened a little and poses no threat to land. It is forecast to intensify more for another day before moving into an area of increasing vertical wind shear, which will weaken it.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center














March 23, 2010

This NASA Aqua image confirmed that 21S is a compact storm, about 90 miles in diameter. > View larger image
This NASA Aqua satellite visible image from March 23 at 0805 UTC (4:05 a.m. EDT) confirmed that 21S is a compact storm, about 90 miles in diameter.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees a Tight Tropical Storm 21S

The Southern Indian Ocean is still warm enough to enable tropical cyclones to form, and Tropical Cyclone 21S did just that today. NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared and visible images of 21S and the infrared showed some limited areas of strong convection, while the visible image showed a very small, compact storm.

At 900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) today, March 23, Tropical Cyclone 21S was located about 505 miles west of Cocos Island near 12.9 degrees South latitude and 88.3 degrees East longitude.

Tropical Storm 21S has maximum sustained winds near 46 mph (40 knots) and tropical storm-force winds extend out to about 45 miles from the center. Today's NASA Aqua satellite visible image confirmed that 21S is a compact storm, about 90 miles in diameter.

The tropical storm was moving southwest at 8 mph (7 knots). The storm is not expected to reach cyclone strength, although it will likely strengthen a little more before encountering adverse atmospheric conditions. Tropical Storm 21S is expected to be short-lived as vertical wind shear is expected to weaken it over the next couple of days. 21S poses no threat to any land areas.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center