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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Depression 10E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
09.03.10
 
September 3, 2010

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over TD10E on Sept. 2 as it organized into a tropical depression. > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over TD10E on Sept. 2 as it organized into a tropical depression. AIRS instrument infrared imagery revealed some strong convection (purple) in the depression's center, indicating some strong uplift of air and developing thunderstorms that power the tropical cyclone
Credit:
NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Spies Tenth Eastern Pacific Tropical Depression

The tenth tropical depression of the eastern Pacific Season formed on Sept. 2, and is maintaining its strength. NASA infrared imagery did reveal some strong convection in the center of Tropical Depression 10E (TD10E) on Sept. 2, and if the convection continues increasing it could become a tropical storm briefly over the weekend.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over TD10E on Sept. 2 as it organized into a tropical depression. Infrared imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument revealed some strong convection in the depression's center, indicating some strong uplift of air and developing thunderstorms that power the tropical cyclone. The cloud top temperatures were very cold, as cold as -63 Fahrenheit. On Sept. 3 at 11 a.m. EDT Tropical depression 10-E had maximum sustained winds near 34 mph, and was centered about 205 mile south of the southern tip of Baja California near 20.0 North and 110.4 West, moving west-northwest at 8 mph. Estimated minimum sea level pressure is 1000 millibars.

TD10E may become a tropical storm this weekend before it weakens again. If it does make tropical storm status it would be named Georgette. TD10E is forecast to move west into the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean over the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.