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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Depression 5 (Gulf of Mexico)
08.20.10
 
August 20, 2010

remnants of Tropical Depression 5 This visible image from the GOES-13 satellite at 1431 UTC (10:31 a.m. EDT) shows the remnants of Tropical Depression 5 as an area of clouds over central Alabama extending into western Georgia. Credit: NASA GOES Project
› Larger image
Tropical Depression Five Remnants Interacting with Cold Front in Georgia

The abundant moisture that the remnants of tropical depression 5 brought to the U.S. south is still around and will be interacting with a frontal boundary to trigger more showers and thunderstorms. A visible satellite image from GOES-13 captured at 1431 UTC (10:31 a.m. EDT) showed the remnants of Tropical Depression 5 as an area of clouds over central Alabama, extending into western Georgia.

GOES-13 is managed by NOAA, and images and animations are created by NASA's GOES Project at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center located in Greenbelt, Md.

The remnant tropical low that has caused heavy rain issues across Louisiana and Mississippi earlier this week is now located in central Alabama. The moisture in TD5's remnants are forecast to interact with a frontal boundary located from north Georgia to southeastern North Carolina that is drifting south today.

The Atlanta metro area is in the target area for that interaction today, August 20. The interaction between the remnants and the cold front are expected to touch off afternoon and evening showers and thunderstorms, some of which may be slow moving. Because of all the moisture in the air, there's a threat of locally heavy rainfall which could possibly result in some minor flooding in low lying areas. This could be the "last hurrah" for the remnants of tropical depression five, a storm with a long track record.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 19, 2010

Tropical Depression 5's remnant showers and clouds (blue) stretch from Louisiana into Alabama. > View larger image
This NASA infrared AIRS satellite image from August 18 at 19:23 UTC (3:23 p.m. EDT) revealed Tropical Depression 5's remnant showers and clouds (blue) stretch from Louisiana into Alabama. The blue and purple area in northern Alabama are showers associated with low pressure not associated with TD5's remnants.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees TD5's Remnants Stretched Out in U.S. South

NASA's Aqua satellite noticed that the showers and thunderstorms from the remnants of Tropical Depression 5 (TD5) extended from Louisiana northeast into southwest Alabama. Infrared imagery indicated some strong thunderstorms over south central Louisiana and northwest Alabama.

NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard the Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of TD5's remnants on August 18 at 19:23 UTC (3:23 p.m. EDT). In the image showers and clouds stretched from Louisiana northeast into Tennessee. The clouds over Louisiana and southern Alabama were part of TD5. The clouds and showers in north central Alabama and Tennessee were generated by a shortwave trough (elongated area of low pressure) moving through Tennessee.

During the time of the AIRS image, the strongest thunderstorms and convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms) were located over south central Louisiana and north central Alabama. Both of those areas experienced heavy rainfall at that time yesterday.

NASA false-colors infrared satellite imagery to show cold and warm areas. The higher, coldest cloud tops of stronger storms are depicted in purple in AIRS infrared images. Those high thunderstorms are as cold as or colder than 220 Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). Warm temperatures, such as those from warm land or sea surfaces are depicted in shades of orange and red (the hottest).

On August 19 at 1:00 p.m. EDT, the lingering remnants of Tropical Depression 5, were over southern Mississippi. TD5's remnants are forecast to drift slowly eastward today and bring numerous showers and thunderstorms to southwestern Alabama. The heavy rainfall has been producing flash flooding over Mississippi. Flooding is now possible today over southwestern Alabama because of the remnants slow motion. To see the current National Weather Service (NWS) radar from Montgomery, Ala., visit: http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=MXX&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes.

The NWS forecast for Meridian, Mississippi, a city located on the east central portion of the state, close to the Alabama border, includes heavy rainfall from showers and thunderstorms. Some of those thunderstorms were dropping between 1 and 2 inches of rainfall. The forecast also notes clouds to ground lightning and gusty winds up to 30 mph. The showers and thunderstorms are forecast to diminish by nightfall.

Located northeast of Meridian, Miss., the town of Livingston, Alabama is also forecast to experience heavy rainfall near and east of a line from the towns of Oneonta to Demopolis as TD5's remnants continue their slow crawl.

TD5's remnants will continue to crawl eastward on Friday as the NWS forecast office in Georgia expects that TD5's remnants to push into the area near Columbus on August 20, triggering showers and thunderstorms.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 18, 2010

GOES 13 image of tropical depression 5 › Larger image
This visible image captured by the GOES-13 satellite August 18 at 14:31 UTC (10:31 a.m. EDT) shows the remnants of TD5 stretches from Louisiana northeast into Mississippi. The high-resolution image shows some higher thunderstorms embedded in the cloud cover.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
AIRS infrared image of tropical depression 5 › View larger image
The AIRS instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared view of TD5's remnant clouds (blue) and showers over Louisiana and the north central Gulf of Mexico on August 18 at 08:23 UTC.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellites See TD5's Remnants Still Soaking Louisiana and Mississippi

Tropical Depression Five's remnants continue to linger over Louisiana and Mississippi, and NASA satellite data continues to capture its cloud temperatures and extent. The slow moving remnants and an associated tropical air mass are expected to creep across the Louisiana and Mississippi and into Arkansas for the next couple of days.

Tropical Depression Five's (TD5) remnants remain over the lower Mississippi valley today and are slowly drifting northeast. Yesterday, NASA satellite imagery observed the bulk of TD5's precipitation just south of Louisiana, over the Gulf of Mexico. Today, August 18, that precipitation has moved north and is drenching east-central Louisiana and western Mississippi.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite called GOES-13 captured a visible image of TD5's remnant clouds on August 18 at 14:31 UTC (10:31 a.m. EDT). The satellite image showed the remnants of TD5 stretched from Louisiana northeast into Mississippi. The high-resolution image even showed some higher thunderstorms embedded in the cloud cover, likely indicating areas of heavier rainfall. The GOES series of satellites are operated by NOAA, and the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates images and animations of GOES satellite imagery.

National Weather Service forecasters noted that "the low is weak and lift has been too small to generate much in the way of rainfall overnight...but with precipitable water observed to be 2.7 inches at Jackson, Mississippi in this tropical air mass, expect convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms) to become widespread after a little [daytime] heating." That means that the showers and thunderstorms will "power up" from the daytime heating and the heaviest precipitation will fall during that time then diminish when the sun sets.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared view of TD5's remnant clouds and showers over Louisiana and the north central Gulf of Mexico on August 18 at 08:23 UTC (4:23 a.m. EDT), and didn't show any extremely high, very cold thunderstorm cloud tops during the early morning hours, which correlates with lighter precipitation during night-time periods. During the daytime when the heat of the sun powers convection (rapidly rising air that condenses and forms clouds and thunderstorms), cloud tops would likely be higher and colder (and thunderstorms more potent) on AIRS infrared imagery.

A flash flood watch was issued for today and this evening for much of central Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana due to the risk for very heavy rainfall associated with the remnants of tropical depression five. Two to three inches of rainfall and locally higher amounts of greater than five inches will be possible.

Live National Weather Service radar from Brandon/Jackson, Mississippi:
radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=DGX&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes

Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas can expect a slow and continued soaking as TD5's remnants continue to creep northeast.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 17, 2010

GOES-13 captured a visible image of TD5's remnants today at 1401 UTC (10:01 a.m. EDT). The image showed a disorganized and elongated system over Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana. › View larger image
GOES-13 captured a visible image of TD5's remnants today at 1401 UTC (10:01 a.m. EDT). The image showed a disorganized and elongated system over Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
This infrared image of TD5's clouds from NASA's Aqua satellite was captured on August 16 at 19:35 UTC (3:35 p.m. EDT) and shows a disorganized system. The strongest convection (and thunderstorms) are colored in purple and appear in several areas. The purple coloration indicates highest cloud tops as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit. They appear scattered over southeastern Texas and various areas south of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico in a half -moon shape from west to east. › View larger image
This infrared image of TD5's clouds from NASA's Aqua satellite was captured on August 16 at 19:35 UTC (3:35 p.m. EDT) and shows a disorganized system. The strongest convection (and thunderstorms) are colored in purple and appear in several areas. The purple coloration indicates highest cloud tops as cold as or colder than -63 Fahrenheit. They appear scattered over southeastern Texas and various areas south of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico in a half -moon shape from west to east.
Credit: NASA/Aqua Project
This TRMM rain map ending at 0600 UTC on August 17 covers the three hour period of rainfall from Aug. 16 at 11 p.m. EDT to Aug. 17 at 2 a.m. EDT. The red area over southeastern and south central Louisiana indicates rainfall .3-.4 inches (6-8 millimeters) over that three hour period.This › View larger image
TRMM rain map ending at 0600 UTC on August 17 covers the three hour period of rainfall from Aug. 16 at 11 p.m. EDT to Aug. 17 at 2 a.m. EDT. The red area over southeastern and south central Louisiana indicates rainfall .3-.4 inches (6-8 millimeters) over that three hour period.
Credit: NASA/TRMM, Hal Pierce
NASA Satellites See Tropical Depression 5's Remnants Giving the Gulf a Wet Encore

NASA's Aqua and TRMM satellites and the GOES-13 satellite have been keeping an eye on the meandering remnants of Tropical Depression 5 (TD5). More rainfall is something that southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi does not need after TD5 tracked through the area this past weekend. However, NASA satellites see TD5 making a return appearance and bringing the heavy rains with it to the same areas today.

TD5 has been around the Gulf of Mexico for a week as of today, August 17. That's a long life for a tropical system. TD5 formed on August 10 and never made it to tropical storm status. After a day of being back over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico yesterday, TD5 is now back over land. That means that the TD5's remnant low pressure area is being cut off from the warm Gulf of Mexico waters that would re-strengthen it into a tropical depression.

On August 16 at 19:35 UTC (3:35 p.m. EDT) an infrared image of Tropical Depression 5's clouds from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite showed a disorganized system. At that time, the strongest convection (and thunderstorms) appeared in several areas and had cloud-top temperatures as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit. Those areas appeared scattered in a half -moon shape from stretching from west to east and all south of Louisiana. The half-moon shape of storms stretched from southeastern Texas eastward to various areas south of Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico.

Today, August 17, TD5's remnants moved inland over the western Mississippi Gulf Coast during the early morning hours (EDT), so the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. noted that there is now a "near zero chance" that TD5's remnants will reform into a tropical depression. That doesn't mean that the Gulf coast will be devoid of effects, however.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite (TRMM) has been measuring TD5's rainfall from space since it developed. "Rainmaps" showing how much rain has fallen over given areas in either in a three hour or seven day period are created at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The three-hour rainfall accumulation map created today, August 17 for the three hour period of rainfall from Aug. 16 at 11 p.m. EDT to Aug. 17 at 2 a.m. EDT showed the heaviest rainfall over southeastern and south central Louisiana where rainfall between .3 and .4 inches (6-8 millimeters) fell early this morning.

Just as TD5 moved inland this weekend over Louisiana and Mississippi and brought heavy rainfall, its bringing them back for an encore performance. Locally heavy rainfall and occasional gusty winds associated with the low are still possible along portions of the north-central Gulf of Mexico coast today.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 captured a visible image of TD5's remnants today at 1401 UTC (10:01 a.m. EDT). The image showed a disorganized and elongated system over Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana. The GOES series of satellites is operated by NOAA. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. provides satellite imagery and animations.

Despite the disorganization, the remnants of TD5 are still packed with abundant moisture, so the National Weather Service (NWS) office in New Orleans, La. has posted a Flash Flood Watch for portions of southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi through Wednesday evening. Coastal flooding is also possible along the western Mississippi coast and portions of the east facing shores of southeast Louisiana so a coastal flood advisory is in effect through the first half of today.

TD5's remnant low pressure area is expected to move slowly west and northwest across southeast and east central Louisiana today and tonight. The NWS is expected another 3 to 5 inches of rainfall with isolated amounts up to 8 inches by Wednesday afternoon. To see live National Weather Service radar covering the region, go to: http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=LIX&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes.

Any slower moving showers and thunderstorms with heavy rainfall could drop 2 to 4 inches in a short time, causing flash flooding.

NASA satellites will continue to provide forecasters with data as the remnants of Tropical Depression 5 continues on its second inland journey.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 16, 2010

TRMM captured rainfall from TD5 on August 16 at 3:09 p.m. CDT and it showed areas of moderate to heavy rainfall. Heavy rainfall is depicted in red (about 2 inches per hour) › Larger image
TRMM captured rainfall from TD5 on August 16 at 3:09 p.m. CDT and it showed areas of moderate to heavy rainfall. Heavy rainfall is depicted in red (about 2 inches per hour).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
TRMM Satellite Sees TD5's Remnant Rains are Persistent

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite flew over the remnants of tropical depression FIVE (TD5)on August 16, 2010 at 2009 UTC (3:09 PM CDT). The rainfall analysis using TRMM data collected at that time shows that there were areas of moderate to heavy rainfall associated with this weak low pressure center along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico. The TRMM rainfall analysis was overlaid on an image derived from TRMM Visible and Infrared (VIRS) data. A visible image from the GOES EAST satellite was used to fill in areas not viewed by the TRMM satellite.

Text credit: Hal Pierce, SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center







AIRS infrared image of Tropical Depression 5 › View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument on the Aqua satellite captured an infrared look at TD5's clouds on August 15 at 18:53 UTC (2:53 p.m. EDT) and noticed some strong convection in the southern side of circulation (purple) over the Gulf of Mexico. That area had strong thunderstorms with cloud tops as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.
Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 5 May Rise Again

Tropical Depression Five's remnants made a loop into southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi this weekend and have again emerged in the Gulf of Mexico. Being back in the warm Gulf waters has given TD 5 a good chance for rebirth and NASA satellites are watching the storm's thunderstorms build.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared look at TD5's clouds on August 15 at 18:53 UTC (2:53 p.m. EDT) and noticed some strong convection in the southern side of circulation over the Gulf of Mexico. That area had strong thunderstorms with cloud tops as cold as -63 Fahrenheit.

On Monday, August 16, the remnant low of TD5 was located over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico about 60 miles southwest of Panama City, Florida. The National Hurricane Center noted that "Environmental conditions are forecast to be conducive for some development of this system as it moves generally westward and then west-northwestward over the northern Gulf of Mexico during the next day or so."

TD5's remnant low pressure area will continue to do what it's done over the weekend, bring heavy rainfall wherever it goes. So, coastal areas in portions of the north central Gulf of Mexico will experience locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds through Tuesday. Meanwhile, TD5 has a 60 percent chance of being reborn as "Tropical Depression 5" again.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 13, 2010

Rain from TD5 that has fallen in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi. > View larger image
The TRMM satellite rainfall map from August 6 through August 13 shows up to 3.9 inches or 100 millimeters (yellow-green) of rain has fallen in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Rain from TD5 that has fallen in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi. > View TRMM animated flood map
This TRMM animated flood map shows the track and development of three tropical systems: TD5, Estelle (in the eastern Pacific) and Colin (in the Atlantic). The animation runs from Aug. 4-13 shows TD5 formed on August 10 as "System 94L" and became Tropical Depression 5 on August 11 (labeled 05L). On August 13 in the animation, southeastern Louisiana is mapped in yellow indicating flood potential.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Maps Flood Potential as TD5's Remnants Keep Soaking Louisiana, Mississippi

Tropical Depression Five (TD5) may not be a tropical depression anymore, but NASA's TRMM satellite has noticed that its remnant low pressure circulation is making for a very bad and wet Friday the 13th for residents from southeastern Louisiana east to the Florida panhandle.

Even when a tropical system gets downgraded into a low pressure area, there is still the possibility of inland flooding from heavy rainfall, and that's what this low is creating.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has been called a "rain gauge in space" and can provide accurate measurements of rainfall in tropical and sub-tropical areas around the world. TRMM data, along with information from other satellites, allows researchers to see how much rain is falling over most of the world every three hours and map areas of potential flooding. Maps that show areas of potential floods use precipitation radar data and high resolution measurements of water content of clouds made by microwave radiometers.

Those rainfall maps were made into a nine day "movie loop" that allows users to track storms as they travel over land and oceans around the globe. The rainfall animations are developed in the Laboratory for Atmospheres of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. by the TRMM precipitation research team.

The TRMM animated flood map from August 4 to August 13 shows the track and development of three tropical systems: TD5, Estelle (in the eastern Pacific) and Colin (in the Atlantic). The animation shows TD5 formed on August 10 as "System 94L" and became Tropical Depression 5 on August 11. On August 13 in the animation, southeastern Louisiana is mapped in yellow indicating the potential for flooding.

On Friday, August 13, the center of tropical depression five's (TD5) remnants were located over the Gulf of Mexico stretching from southeast Louisiana, east to the Florida panhandle. TD5's remnants have already generated up to five inches of rainfall in portions of southeastern Louisiana since Thursday morning, according to the National Weather Service.

TD5's remnants are moving very slowly, and that means more heavy rainfall for those areas today, August 13. As a result, a Flash Flood Watch is in effect for portions of southeastern Louisiana and coast Mississippi through 7 p.m. CDT today.

The flash flood watch includes the following Parishes in southeast Louisiana: Assumption, Lower Jefferson, Lower Lafourche, Lower Plaquemines, Lower St. Bernard, Lower Terrebonne, Orleans, St. Charles, St. James, St. John the Baptist, St. Tammany, Upper Jefferson, Upper Lafourche, Upper Plaquemines, Upper St. Bernard and Upper Terrebonne. In Southern Mississippi the watch covers Hancock, Harrison, Jackson and Pearl River counties. Live radar from the National Weather Service for New Orleans, La.: http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=LIX&product=NCR&overlay=11111111&loop=yes.

The National Weather Service noted that between one and two more inches of rainfall, with isolated amounts of up to five inches are possible in the watch areas today. Along the coast, tides are expected to be a foot above normal, and coastal flooding is not anticipated.

For more information about how TRMM looks at rainfall, visit NASA's TRMM website at: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 12, 2010

Tropical Depression 5's clouds as a circular shape over southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi. > View larger image
The GOES-13 image created at 11:32 UTC (7:32 a.m. EDT) showed Tropical Depression 5's clouds as a circular shape over southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-13 Sees Tropical Depression 5's Rounded Remnants Raining on Louisiana, Mississippi

The remnants of former Tropical Depression 5 are now bringing heavy rains and local flooding to southeastern Louisiana, including New Orleans, and coastal Mississippi and the GOES-13 satellite showed the remnants as a circular area of clouds over those areas.

The center of its circulation moved onshore between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. CDT (4 a.m. and 5 a.m. EDT). Local National Weather Service radar showed that the circulation seemed to become better formed as it was making landfall early this morning with spiral rainbands around the east and west periphery of the center.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 monitors weather conditions over the eastern U.S. The GOES series of satellites is operated by NOAA. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. provides satellite imagery and animations. The image created at 11:32 UTC (7:32 a.m. EDT) showed Tropical Depression 5's clouds as a circular shape over southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi.

What happens when a tropical system makes landfall and moves slowly? Heavy rainfall and inland flooding. That's what's happening with southeastern Louisiana and coastal Mississippi today.

During the morning hours on August 12, the remnants of tropical depression number five were moving onshore in St. Bernard and Plaquemines parishes in southeast Louisiana. Because the remnants are forecast to move slowly, heavy rainfall is likely, with amounts from three inches to as much as five inches.

The National Weather Service posted a Flash Flood Watch through Friday evening for PORTIONS OF Southeast Louisiana and Southern Mississippi, including Southeast Louisiana, Assumption, Lower Jefferson, Lower Lafourche, Lower Plaquemines, Lower St. Bernard, Lower Terrebonne, Orleans, St. Charles, St. James, St. John the Baptist, St. Tammany, Upper Jefferson, Upper Lafourche, Upper Plaquemines, Upper St. Bernard and Upper Terrebonne. In Southern Mississippi, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson and Pearl River. To see live radar of the region from the National Weather Service: http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=LIX&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes.

What are the winds like in the remnants of Tropical Depression 5? Winds are actually light, "generally under 10 knots (11 mph) over land," according to the National Weather Service. However, the atmosphere in the region this morning is like a wet blanket, with dewpoints in the upper 70s.

The center of Tropical Depression 5's remnants are expected to move into west central Mississippi late Friday into Saturday and pull the precipitation with it. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. noted that there is a "zero percent" chance of Tropical Depression 5 reforming as it continues moving inland.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



August 10, 2010

August 10 at 6:22 p.m., TRMM passed revealed that the storm's precipitation pattern was slightly better organized than earlier. > View larger image
The TRMM satellite passed above TD5 on August 10 at 6:22 p.m. EDT and revealed that the storm's precipitation pattern was slightly better organized than earlier. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour. Red areas are heavy rainfall at almost 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA Goddard/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Warnings Up for Tropical Depression 5 in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

One of the two systems that forecasters have been closely watching in the Atlantic Ocean Basin became the fifth tropical depression at 7:30 p.m. EDT on August 10 in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. NASA's TRMM satellite confirmed better organization in the system's rainbands just before it was classified as a tropical depression.

System 94L is now Tropical Depression 5 (TD5), and is forecast to strengthen into Tropical Storm Danielle in the next day or so.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed above TD5 on August 10 at 2226 UTC (6:22 p.m. EDT). The rainfall pattern was analyzed using data from TRMM's Precipitation Radar (PR) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) instrument data. The precipitation pattern showed that TD5 was slightly better organized than earlier, helping forecasters with the decision to classify the system as a tropical depression. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA.

The National Hurricane Center issued a tropical storm warning from Destin, Florida to Intracoastal City Louisiana, including Lake Pontchartrain and New Orleans. That means tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area in 36 hours. Heavy rain, tropical storm force winds and a storm surge between 2 and 4 feet near landfall and east of landfall are forecast.

At 5 a.m. EDT on August 11, Tropical Depression 5 (TD5) had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph, and slow strengthening is expected. It was centered near 26.8 north latitude and 85.1 west longitude. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1008 millibars. It is expected to continue moving northwest near 10 mph today, and slow on Thursday, August 12 when it will be approaching the north central Gulf of Mexico in the morning.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



System 93L is in the Central Atlantic Ocean and System 94L's clouds stretch from the eastern Gulf of Mexico into the Atlantic. > View larger image
The GOES-13 satellite captured this visible image of the 2 systems on August 10 at 10:45 a.m. EDT. System 93L is in the Central Atlantic Ocean and System 94L's clouds stretch from the eastern Gulf of Mexico into the Atlantic.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
AIRS shows most of the convection and thunderstorms are over the Florida Keys and the eastern Gulf of Mexico. > View larger image
This NASA infrared image on August 10 at 0735 UTC (3:35 a.m. EDT) from the AIRS instrument shows most of the strongest convection and highest thunderstorms are over the Florida Keys and stretched west into the eastern Gulf of Mexico.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Two Lows in the Atlantic Have High Tropical Potential

The GOES-13 Satellite has been busy keeping an eye on two developing low pressure areas numbered 94L and 93L in the Atlantic Ocean today that have a high potential for tropical development.

The first low is in the Central Atlantic Ocean designated as System 93L and the other, System 94L stretches from the eastern Gulf of Mexico into the Atlantic. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-13 captured a visible image at 1445 UTC (10:45 a.m. EDT) today, August 10 that showed System 94L's clouds over South Florida to northwestern Cuba. System 93L's clouds appear more compact, and more closely resemble and organized system.

GOES-13 is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and images are created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Satellite imagery shows that the showers and thunderstorms related to System 93L has not become any better organized this morning. System 93L is about 820 miles east-northeast of the Leeward Islands and has slowed in forward movement. System 93L is also moving into a less favorable environment, but the National Hurricane Center still gives it a good chance for development.

Closer to land is System 94L. That system is located over the southeastern Gulf of Mexico, and is centered less than 100 miles west of the southwest coast of Florida. System 94L has a large area of showers and thunderstorms, but it, too, has not organized much more during the morning hours of August 10.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over System 94L this morning at 3:35 a.m. EDT, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. The data showed most of the strongest convection and highest thunderstorms are over the Florida Keys and stretched west into the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

System 94L appears to be in a better environment for development, because upper-level winds are forecast to relax. Both systems are given a 60 percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center