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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Depression 2E (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
06.18.10
 
June 18, 2010

TRMM sees Tropical Depression 2E> View larger image
TRMM's satellite image of Tropical Depression 2-E on June 17 at 19:59 UTC (3:59 p.m. EDT) showed that moderate rainfall (green) was occurring over the ocean, off the western Mexican coast. TRMM showed that light rain (blue) was falling over Oaxaca at that time. Credit: NASA, Hal Pierce
NASA's TRMM Satellite Sees Tropical Depression 2-E Dissipating

The National Hurricane Center issued the final advisory on the Eastern Pacific Ocean's second tropical depression (2-E) on June 17 at 11 a.m. EDT. NASA satellite imagery from mid-afternoon that day revealed the depression's rains were waning, and the heaviest rainfall was over open ocean. As of June 18 Tropical Depression 2-E had dissipated off the coast.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite known as TRMM measures rainfall from space. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese Space Agency and is a critical tool for forecasters of tropical cyclones because it can tell the rate of rainfall in a storm, acting as a "rain gauge from space." TRMM's satellite image of Tropical Depression 2-E (TD2-E) on June 17 at 19:59 UTC (3:59 p.m. EDT) showed that moderate rainfall was occurring over the ocean, off the western Mexican coast. TRMM showed that light rain was falling over Oaxaca at that time.

On June 18 at 9 a.m. EDT, weather stations in Oxaca were reporting overcast conditions (at 10,000 feet), light drizzle, and a light wind of 2 mph from the northwest. Acapulco, located to the north-northwest of Oxaca is just reporting overcast skies with calm winds.

The last official position of Tropical Depression 2-E at 11 a.m. EDT was 35 miles south of Punto Maldonado, Mexico, near 15.8 North and 98.6 West. At that time, TD2-E still had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph, and a minimum central pressure of 1008 millibars.

The government of Mexico discontinued all tropical storm watches and warnings by mid-day on June 17.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 17, 2010

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of TD2E hugging the coast of western Mexico, center, and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas that appears as a half circle, left.> View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of TD2-E hugging the coast of western Mexico (small rounded area, center) and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas that appears as a half circle (left). Both have high, strong thunderstorms in their center (purple). Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 2-E Struggling, While Tropical Storm Blas is Born

NASA infrared satellite imagery captured two tropical depressions in the Eastern Pacific Ocean today, as one struggles to survive and the other powered up into Tropical Storm Blas.

On June 17 at 08:11 UTC (4:11 a.m. EDT/1:11 PDT) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Depression 2-E (TD2-E) hugging the coast of western Mexico and the western half of Tropical Storm Blas which is farther west and in open waters. Both have high, strong thunderstorms in their center. The AIRS image indicates strong convection, with cloud top temperatures as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit.

Tropical Depression 2-E in the Eastern Pacific is close to land and although it is having difficultly strengthening it is still bringing a lot of rain to the western Mexican coast to the states of Oxaca and southern Guerrero. At 5 a.m. PDT (8 a.m. EDT) TD2-E still had maximum sustained winds near 30 mph, as it did 24 hours before. It was located near 15.6 North and 98.0 West, about 60 miles (100 km) west-southwest of Puerto Escondido, Mexico, or 65 miles (105 km) southeast of Punto Maldonado, Mexico. TD2-E is moving at 9 mph (15 km/hr) toward the west-northwest, and has a minimum central pressure of 1008 millibars.

Heavy rainfall is the main threat from this system. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Salina Cruz to Acapulco, Mexico and a tropical storm watch in in effect for areas west of Acapulco to Zihuatanejo. TD2-E is expected to continue moving north-northwest along the coast for the next day or two, continuing its rainy assault over land.

TD2-E is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches along the coast of the state of Oaxaca and southern Guerrero, with possible isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches. These rains could produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT) on June 17, the third tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Hurricane Season was born. By 11:40 a.m. EDT (8:40 a.m. PDT) Tropical Depression 3-E (TD3-E) had strengthened into Tropical Storm Blas with maximum sustained winds near 40 mph and is expected to strengthen more over the next 48 hours. It is currently located about 265 miles (425 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, near 15.3 North latitude and 105.3 West longitude. It is moving northeast near 2 mph (4 km/hr) and is expected to turn to the west-northwest. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1006 millibars. There are no coastal warnings in effect for this tropical storm.

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 16, 2010

GOES-11 sees Tropical Depression 2E developing.> View larger image
The GOES-11 satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Depression 2-E (lower right corner) and System 92E as the rounded area of clouds farther away from land (left, center) on June 16 at 12:00 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT). Credit: NASA GOES Project
Tropical Depression 2-E Forms in the Eastern Pacific, Number Three May Follow

The second tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season formed close to the western Mexican coast this morning, and the third tropical depression may develop in the next day or two. NASA satellite imagery captured the two systems in one image, right after Tropical Depression 2-E formed.

The GOES-11 satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Depression 2-E and System 92E on June 16 at 12:00 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT). GOES-11 was launched by NASA and is now operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NASA's GOES Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. created the latest satellite image.

Tropical Depression 2-E (TD 2-E) formed at 8:30 a.m. PDT (11:30 a.m. EDT) today, June 16. It is located near 14.8 North and 95.6 West, or about 100 miles (160 km) south-southwest of Salina Cruz, Mexico and 225 miles (360 km) east-southeast of Punto Maldonado, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph and the TD 2-E appears stationary but is expected to move in a slow west-northwestward motion later today. TD 2-E will track very close to the coast of Mexico in the next day or two. TD 2-E's minimum central pressure is 1007 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted that "the depression could become a tropical storm by Thursday."

On June 14, TD 2-E started out as a low pressure areas near the Gulf of Tehuantepec. At that time, the other area of low pressure, known now as System 92E, was about 350 miles west-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. Today, System 92E is west of TD 2-E and it is near 14.6 North and 105.7 West, approximately 275 nautical mies south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. System 92 E's center is expected to continue consolidating over the next 24-36 hours, and it may become a tropical depression in that time frame.

Meanwhile, Tropical Depression 2-E poses a threat to land areas. As a result of its close proximity to land the government of Mexico has issued a tropical storm warning for the Southern coast of Mexico from Salina Cruz westward to Lagunas de Chacahua. That means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area within 36 hours.

In the warning areas, TD 2-E is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 4 to 8 inches along the immediate coast of Oaxaca with possible isolated maximum amounts of 12 inches. These could produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

Mexico has also issued a tropical storm watch from west of Lagunas de Chacahua westward to Punta Maldonado. A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the watch area...generally within 48 hours.

If TD 2-E strengthens into a tropical storm, it would be named "Tropical Storm Blas."

Text credit: Rob Gutro/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center