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Hurricane Season 2010: Tropical Depression 1W (Northwest Pacific)
01.20.10
 
January 20, 2010

TRMM captured the rainfall rates of TD01W on January 20 as it was fading over Vietnam and Cambodia. > View larger image
TRMM captured the rainfall rates of TD01W on January 20 at 0845 UTC (3:45 p.m. local time Vietnam) as it was fading over Vietnam and Cambodia. The rainfall was widely scattered and light (yellow).
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
Tropical Depression 01W Fading Over Vietnam and Cambodia

Tropical Depression 01W wasn't very well organized when it made landfall earlier today, and is dissipating as it now moves from Vietnam westward into Cambodia.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite has noticed that Tropical Depression 01W's (TD01W) rainfall is now light and very widely scattered. In addition, the low level center of the storm has been dislocated to the west of the area of precipitation as a result of wind shear.

TRMM, managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency flew over Tropical Depression 01W (TD01W) early today, January 20 at 0845 UTC (3:45 a.m. ET/ 3:45 p.m. local time, Vietnam). TRMM revealed that the depression was already dissipating over land because the storm's rainfall was widely scattered and light to moderate (between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour) in isolated areas.

At 4 p.m. ET yesterday, January 19 (4 a.m. January 20, Vietnam local time) the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued its final warning on the depression. At that time, TD01W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28 mph). At that time, was located about 125 miles southeast of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, near 9.8 North latitude and 107.8 East longitude. Since then, TD01W made landfall and is dissipating over land.

At 2 p.m. ET today, January 20, the cities of Battambang and Siemreap in Cambodia; and Dong Hoi, Thanh Hoa, Vinh and Son La in Vietnam were all reporting light rain, while other areas around both countries reported variable cloud conditions as TD01W's remnants continue to dissipate.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



January 19, 2010

TRMM captured the rainfall rates of TD01W on January 18. > View larger image
TRMM captured the rainfall rates of TD01W on January 18. The rainfall is all to the north and west of the storm's center. The yellow and green areas indicate moderate rainfall between .78 to 1.57 inches per hour. Red areas are heavy rainfall at almost 2 inches per hour.
Credit: NASA/SSAI, Hal Pierce
First Tropical Depression of 2010 Forms in Northwestern Pacific

Tropical Depression 01W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean yesterday and is now headed for a landfall in Vietnam. NASA satellite data shows that the system is weakening as it continues on its track through the South China Sea.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, managed by NASA and the Japanese Space Agency flew over Tropical Depression 01W (TD01W) on Monday, January 18 at 0859 UTC (3:59 a.m. ET/ 3:59 p.m. local time, Vietnam). TRMM noticed that the storm's rain fall was limited to the northern and western sectors of the storm. There were some isolated areas of heavy rainfall where rain was falling at about 2 inches per hour. However, most of the rain was moderate, falling at rates between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour.

TRMM images are pretty complicated to create. They're made at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. At Goddard, rain rates in the center of the swath (the satellite's orbit path over the storm) are created from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) instrument. The TRMM PR is the only space borne radar of its kind. The rain rates in the outer portion of the storm are created from a different instrument on the satellite, called the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are then overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). For more information about TRMM, visit: http://www.trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

At 10 a.m. ET (10 p.m. Vietnam local time) today, January 19, Tropical Depression 01W had maximum sustained winds near 25 knots (28 mph). It was located about 190 miles southeast of Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam, near 9.1 North latitude and 108.7 East longitude. TD01W was moving northwest near 8 knots (9 mph). TD01W is generating 8- foot high waves in the South China Sea today.

Satellite data has also shown that TD01W's low level circulation center is exposed, and that the storm is in an area with vertical wind shear (which can weaken and tear a storm apart). An exposed center allows dry air or wind shear to enter the storm and weaken it. TD01W is forecast to weaken over the next 12 hours and dissipate after making landfall in Vietnam.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center