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Hurricane Season 2009: Nangka (Western Pacific)
06.26.09
 
June 26, 2009

The infrared image shows Nangka's cold clouds in purple and blue. > Larger image This infrared image, created on June 25 at 1:53 p.m. EDT (17:53 UTC) shows Nangka's cold clouds in purple and blue.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
After tarrying over the Philippines, Nangka scurries toward Hong Kong

After hanging over the Philippines for three days, tropical storm Nangka has moved into the South China Sea and is expected to strike the China coast just east of Hong Kong. Its winds have weakened, with maximum gusts reaching 40 knots. Maximum significant wave height has decreased to 12 feet. The storm will dissipate rapidly after making landfall.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Nangka from space, and data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard Aqua captured a view of the extent of Nangka's cold clouds. The infrared image, created on June 25 at 1:53 p.m. EDT (17:53 UTC) shows Nangka's cold clouds in purple and blue. Those areas in purple have temperatures as cold or colder than 220 Kelvins or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit. The blue areas are around 240 Kelvins, or minus 27 degrees Fahrenheit. The colder the clouds are, the higher they are, and the more powerful the thunderstorms are that make up the cyclone.

Text credit: Ed Olsen, NASA JPL



June 25, 2009

NASA's Aqua satellite captured the eastern half of Tropical Storm Nangka's clouds (purple) > Larger image NASA's Aqua satellite captured the eastern half of Tropical Storm Nangka's clouds (purple), which were still raining on parts of the Philippines on June 24.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Like "Rainy Days and Mondays" Nangka Getting Philippine Residents Down

Like the classic Carpenters' song that goes: "Hangin' around, nothing to do but frown, rainy days and Mondays always get me down," Nangka is getting residents down. In fact, Public storm signal number One is in effect in the Zambales and Western Pangasinan areas of the Philippines. It's still raining there and that's troublesome.

Although the center of Tropical Storm Nangka is now at sea, the storm isn't moving fast enough for residents of the Philippines. That means more trouble with heavy and large amounts of rainfall, flooding and mudslides, especially in the mountainous areas.

Asia-Pacific News reported that eight people were killed as a result of the storm. The National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) reported two drowned, two died in a landslide. Four others were fishermen whom were killed by a tornado in the Quezon province, about 120 miles south of Manila. When tropical storms and hurricanes make landfall, the friction to the atmosphere caused by the terrain can spawn tornadoes.

According to the NDCC, there are also 11 others missing. One was a young child carried away by floodwaters. Two teens who were swimming and eight fishermen were swept to sea by strong currents.

The most recent bulletin by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) noted that Nangka was moving north-northwest at 12 mph (11 knots), but it's not moving quickly enough to alleviate flooding problems. In the last 24 hours, the storm has tracked from the southeast of Manila to 185 miles northwest of the city, near 16.1 north latitude and 118.4 east longitude. Maximum sustained winds were near 52 mph (45 knots). Nangka is also still generating waves up to 14 feet high making for dangerous surf conditions.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the eastern half of Tropical Storm Nangka's high, cold clouds on June 24 at 1:11 p.m. EDT (17:11 UTC). The satellite was flying east of the storm's center, so it wasn't able to capture the western half of the storm in the image.

Temperatures (in purple) are as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). Other areas (in blue) are as cold as 240 degrees Kelvin, or minus 27F. The colder the clouds are, the higher they are, and the more powerful the thunderstorms are that make up the cyclone.

Nangka is centered over water in the South China Sea and is now expected to head north towards mainland China. It's expected to stay a tropical storm and should make landfall in China, east of Hong Kong, by the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 24, 2009

Tropical Storm Nangka is moving into open ocean, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured it moving out of the Philippines. > Larger image Tropical Storm Nangka is moving into open ocean, and NASA's Aqua satellite captured it moving out of the Philippines.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Manila Drenched by Nangka as It Moves Back Over Open Water

You wouldn't think that a storm named after something as innocent as a fruit would cause a lot of problems, but "Nangka" named for a jackfruit in the Philippines is bringing heavy rains and gusty winds to Manila. Nangka's rains and winds will be a memory by tomorrow, however as it has already moved into the Sulu Sea and is taking a north-northwesterly track toward mainland China.

On June 24 at 8 a.m. EDT, Nangka had sustained winds of 46 mph (40 knots) and was moving west-northwestward at 12 mph (11 knots). Nangka's center was located about 75 nautical miles south-southwest of Manila, near 14.1 degrees north latitude and 119.9 degrees east longitude. Nangka, also known as "Feria" to residents of the Philippines, is actually now over water in the Sulu Sea (northeast of the South China Sea) and is expected to intensify in the warm waters as it moves away from the Philippines.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured the western half of Nangka on June 23 at 2:05 p.m. EDT (18:05 Zulu Time) in an infrared image when it was already starting to move into the open Sulu Sea.

The infrared image shows a big difference in the temperature of Nangka's cold thunderstorm cloud tops and the warm ocean temperatures. In this image, the orange temperatures are 80F (300 degrees Kelvin) or warmer and that's the direction the storm is headed, so it is expected to strengthen. Nangka's lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops. Those temperatures are as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F).

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 23, 2009

NASA's Aqua satellite saw that Tropical Storm Nangka's clouds (purple) are affecting a number of the regions in the Philippines > Larger image NASA's Aqua satellite saw that Tropical Storm Nangka's clouds (purple) are affecting a number of the regions in the Philippines.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 04W Becomes Tropical Storm Nangka

It didn't take long for Tropical Depression 04W to strengthen into Tropical Storm Nangka, and its bringing rain to most of the Philippines today and tomorrow. Today, June 23, at 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UT) Nangka had sustained winds near 35 knots or 40 mph, and even higher gusts. Satellite imagery showed well-defined circulation and banding of thunderstorms which indicate an organized (and strengthening) storm.

Nangka was located about 345 nautical miles southeast of Manila, the Philippines, near 11.3 north and 125.8 east. Nanga is already bringing rains to the following regions: Eastern, Western and Central Visayas; Bicol Region; Northern Mindanao; and the Capital Region. It is moving north-northwest near 9 knots (10 mph). Nangka is forecast to track north-northeast over the rest of the Philippine regions: Calabarzon; Central Luzon; Cagayan Valley; Iolocos Region; and Cordillera Administrative Region; before moving briefly back to sea and then onto Taiwan.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Nangka from space, and data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard Aqua captured a view of the extent of Nangka's cold clouds covering all of those regions previously mentioned. The image was created on June 22 at 1:23 p.m. EDT (17:23 UTC).

The AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The coldest cloud temperatures are in purple. There is clearly a lot of purple in Nangka, indicating high thunderstorm cloudtops and heavy rains.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



June 22, 2009

NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Depression 04W on June 22 > Larger image NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Depression 04W on June 22.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Another Tropical Depression Forms in the Western Pacific

Tropical Depression 04W formed in the western Pacific to the east of the main island of the Philippines today, June 22 and it is forecast to head to Luzon.

At 11 a.m. EDT on June 22, Tropical Depression 04W was about 520 miles east-southeast of Manila, Philippines, near 11.0 north and 129.2 east. It was moving west near 19 knots (21 mph) and had sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph).

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of 04W on June 22 at (1:05 a.m. EDT) 0505 UTC as the satellite flew overhead.

Depression 04W is expected to make landfall on Wednesday and then re-emerge in the South China Sea.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center