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Hurricane Season 2009: Cyclone Phyan (Arabian Sea)
11.12.09
 
November 12, 2009

AIRS image of Phyan> View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of Cyclone Phyan's remnants over Tibet on November 12. At that time, Phyan was still showing some moderate rainfall and cold cloud tops (in blue) as cold as -27F. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

MODIS image of Phyan> View larger image
NASA's MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite captured this stunning visual image of Tropical Cyclone Phyan making landfall north of Mumbai on November 11 at 0845 UTC (3:45 ET). Credit: MODIS Rapid Response Team
Cyclone Phyan Raining on Tibet After Breaking a Record in India

Cyclone Phyan broke a 43 year record when it made landfall north of the city of Mumbai, India during the evening hours on November 11. NASA's Aqua satellite captured Phyan's landfall with one instrument, and a day later, another of Aqua's instruments show the storm's remnants raining Tibet as Phyan continues to dissipate.

Phyan is the first tropical cyclone to make an appearance in November in the Konkan region of India since 1996. The India Meteorological Department confirmed that the last November appearance of a storm in that region was 43 years ago. As Phyan was making landfall, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead, and the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer captured a stunning visual image of the storm on November 11 at 0845 UTC (3:45 ET).

Today, November 12 at 1:30 p.m. local time (2:30 a.m. ET) another instrument on Aqua called the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) captured an image of Phyan's remnant cold clouds and showers over Tibet. The AIRS image showed that Phyan still had cold cloud tops as cold as -27F and was dumping moderate rainfall over Lake Manasarovar and Raksas Tal in Tibet.

The official final warning on Phyan was issued on November 11 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. ET) from the U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Phyan's center was located near 19.2 degrees North latitude and 73.6 East longitude, about 30 miles east-northeast of Mumbai, India. Cyclone Phyan had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph) and it was moving northeast near 16 mph.

According to Sifynews.com, before Phyan came ashore, the storm caused the deaths of seven fishermen. As of this morning, November 12, there are still 100 fisherman missing in the Arabian Sea because of the rough conditions the cyclone created on its approach to its landfall. Pyhan also affected the Sugar cane industry. Sugar cane harvesting was delayed because of flooded fields in Maharashtra, India’s second-biggest producer. Maharashtra is a state located on India's western coast. Other reports cited damages to more than 7,500 homes. Almost 100 were destroyed from Phyan's tropical storm force winds as wind gusts to 55 mph were reported upon Phyan's landfall. Phyan's remnants should dissipate over Tibet later today or tomorrow.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



November 10, 2009

NASA's Aqua satellite captured cold thunderstorm cloud tops of Cyclone 4A with temperatures as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite captured cold thunderstorm cloud tops of Cyclone 4A with temperatures as cold as -63 degrees Fahrenheit, indicating strong convection is occurring in the storm.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Sees High Thunderstorms in Newly Formed Tropical Cyclone 4A Near India

Tropical Cyclone 4A formed late yesterday off the western coast of India in the Arabian Sea, and NASA's infrared imagery captured some high, powerful thunderstorms developing in the storm's center.

Tropical Cyclone (TC) 4A formed yesterday around 4 p.m. ET, 380 miles south-southwest of Mumbai, India, with maximum sustained winds near 37 mph. By 10 a.m. ET today, November 10, 4A had moved north about 135 miles. Cyclone 4A was located about 245 miles south-southwest of Mumbai, near 15.2 North and 71.1. East. It still maintained sustained winds near 37 mph, and was moving north at 13 mph.

The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center, the organization that forecasts tropical cyclones in that region of the world, noted that gusty winds between 34-40 mph (55-65 kmph) and heavy rainfall (as much as 10 inches or 250 millimeters) will affect Konkan and Goa and Madhya Maharastra over the next two days as the storm moves north. Gusty winds and heavy rainfall is also expected over coastal Karnataka, Kerala and Lakshadweep in the next day, South Gujarat will begin to feel rainfall and gusty winds from 04A on November 11.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over TC4A on November 9 at 20:59 UTC (3:59 p.m. ET) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard captured an infrared image of Cyclone 4A's cold thunderstorm tops. The infrared imagery revealed that TC4A's cloud tops had some strong thunderstorms around its center of circulation, where temperatures are colder than -63 Fahrenheit. That indicates strong convection and development of thunderstorms that power the cyclone.

TC4A is expected to continue intensifying over the next couple of days while traveling north in the Arabian Sea and continuing to parallel the western Indian coast. It is expected to make landfall east of the India / Pakistan border late Wednesday Universal Time (mid-day Eastern Time).

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center