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Hurricane Season 2009: Tropical Depression Mujigae (Western Pacific)
09.11.09
 
September 11, 2009

The cold areas in this image (yellow-green) indicate where there is precipitation or ice in the cloud tops. > View larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS and AMSU instrument data created a microwave image of Mujigae on September 10 at 2:59 p.m. EDT. The cold areas in this image (yellow-green) indicate where there is precipitation or ice in the cloud tops. The purple area, located over southern Hainan Island, China has the coldest cloud temperatures to -63F and suggests cloud heights to the 200 millibar level, near the tropopause.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
The purple area in Mujigae's center revealed the strongest winds. Wind direction is indicated by small barbs. > View larger image NASA's QuikScat used microwave technology to capture an image of Mujigae's surface winds September 11 at 6:53 a.m. EDT after it moved over Hainan Island and was poised for landfall in Vietnam. The purple area in Mujigae's center revealed the strongest winds. Wind direction is indicated by small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. Credit: NASA/JPL, Peter Falcon
NASA Microwave Satellite Imagery Sees Extremely High Clouds in Mujigae

Microwave imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed extremely high thunderstorms in Tropical Depression Mujigae while it was making its way over Hainan Island, China. The tops of the thunderstorms were so high, in fact they topped out near the tropopause, the level of atmosphere between the troposphere and stratosphere.

Those high thunderstorms mean very heavy rainfall for the area below them, and that was southern Hainan Island. The clouds were so high, in fact, to the 200 millibar level in the atmosphere, that the temperatures within were as cold or colder than -63 Fahrenheit. Mujigae made landfall early this morning over the southern region of Hainan Island and brought heavy rain to the Wenchang and Haikou areas before moving west into South China Sea toward Vietnam.

Microwave images are created when data from NASA's Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) instruments are combined. These microwave images indicate where there is precipitation or ice in the cloud tops and the latest microwave image revealed Mujigae had cold, high thunderstorms.

NASA's QuikScat made an early morning fly-by today, September 11 at 6:53 a.m. EDT. QuikScat uses microwave technology to determine a tropical cyclone's surface wind speeds, and it captured data of Mujigae's surface winds after it moved over Hainan Island.

Several hours later, at 11 a.m. today, September 11, Mujigae was located about 115 nautical miles southeast of Hanoi, Vietnam, near 19.7 north 106.9 east and was moving west near 9 mph. Its maximum sustained winds were still near 34 mph.

The U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that "Mujigae will continue to track westward into coastal Vietnam within the next 12 to 18 hours, and will begin to dissipate quickly.".

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center










September 10, 2009

Tropical Depression 14W Gets the Name "Mujigae"

On September 10, Mujigae was located 195 nautical miles south-southwest of Hong Kong, near 19.4 north and 112.1 east. It was moving west-northwest near 13 mph. Wind shear and the intrusion of dry air into the tropical cyclone will keep it from intensifying significantly before it makes landfall this weekend.

Mujigae is expected to cross China's Hainan Island on September 11 before heading toward Vietnam. Island residents can expect some heavy downpours and gusty winds .

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



September 9, 2009

Tropical Depression 14W (right center round area of clouds) on September 9 at 2:05 a.m. EDT. > View larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument captured this visible image of Tropical Depression 14W (right center round area of clouds) on September 9 at 2:05 a.m. EDT. China's Hainan Island lies to the left of 14W in the Western Pacific Ocean.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Depression 14W Forms in the South China Sea

The fourteenth tropical depression of the western Pacific Hurricane Season formed today and is moving towards China's Hainan Island.

14W formed in the South China sea is expected to intensify to tropical storm strength before making landfall in the peninsula north of Hainan Island sometime on Friday, September 11.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over 14W earlier today, September 9 at 2:05 a.m. EDT, and its Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured a visible image of the storm.

By 11 a.m. EDT, Tropical Depression 14W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34 mph) and is expected to intensify into a tropical storm in the next day or two. It was located 290 nautical miles southeast of Hong Kong, near 18.4 north and 116.9 east. It was moving west-northwest near 10 mph.

The current forecast track from the U.S. Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center takes 14W past Hainan Island and making landfall in Vietnam over the coming weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center