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Hurricane Season 2009: Tropical Depression Maka (Central Pacific)
08.13.09
 
August 13, 2009

GOES-11 captured all four tropical areas in the Pacific on August 13 at 8 a.m. EDT. > View larger image
GOES-11 captured all four tropical areas in the Pacific on Aug. 13 at 8 a.m. EDT: from left to right, the remnants of Maka and Felicia, then TD9E and finally,Tropical Storm Guillermo, which looks pretty impressive west of the Mexican coast.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-11 captured all four tropical areas in the Pacific on August 13 at 8 a.m. EDT. > View larger image
This is a "full-disk" image of the Earth taken by GOES-11. In the image, north of the equator, you can see where GOES-11 captured all four tropical areas in the Pacific on Aug. 13 at 8 a.m. EDT: from left to right, the remnants of Maka and Felicia, then TD9E and finally,Tropical Storm Guillermo.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-11 Sees Tropical Cyclones Fizzling and Forming in the Eastern Pacific!

There are a lot of ups and downs in tropical cyclone formation in the Pacific Ocean this week, and that's keeping NOAA's GOES-11 satellite busy. There are remnants of Maka and Tropical Depression 9E, a fizzled Felicia, and a new Tropical Storm named Guillermo.

The graphics folks that create images from the satellite at the GOES Project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. are posting updated images on the GOES Project website often and forecasters are watching them.

In the Central Pacific Ocean, Maka and Felicia are now a memory. Felicia dissipated before it reached Hawaii, and the remnants of Maka are 1,400 miles west-southwest of Kauai. Maka's remnant clouds and showers are still moving west, and it's unlikely that it will re-organize. That means a quiet Central Pacific Ocean for the next two days.

In the Eastern Pacific, Tropical Depression 9E (TD9E) appears to be fizzling although it may get a second chance at life, while Tropical Depression 10E powered up into Tropical Storm Guillermo.

The remnants of TD9E are weakly spinning to around 30 mph, while it continues moving west-southwest near 9 mph. The center was located about 1,750 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near 13.9 north and 134.1 west. The National Hurricane Center noted that shower and thunderstorm activity has increased this morning, and the environment seems to be a little more conducive to strengthening, so TD9E isn't written off yet. In fact, there's about a 30-50% chance it may strengthen back into a tropical depression.

Meanwhile, Tropical Depression 10E gained strength took the name Guillermo and it's sustained winds whipped up to near 50 mph. Guillermo is moving west-northwest near 16 mph and will continue in that direction. Guillermo is closer to mainland Mexico, but poses no threat as its heading away from land. On Aug. 13 at 5 a.m. EDT the storm was located 805 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California near 16.9 north and 120.5 west. His minimum central pressure is 999 millibars. Guillermo is moving into a favorable environment, so he's expected to continue strengthening.

Even though the peak of hurricane season in the eastern and central Pacific Oceans are a month away, it seems like we're already there.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



August 12, 2009

From left to right: Trop. Depression Maka, Felicia, Tropical Depression 9E, and a developing low near Mexico. > View larger image
GOES-11 captured four tropical areas on Aug. 12 at 8 a.m. EDT, from left to right: Trop. Depression Maka, Felicia, now a low pressure area, Tropical Depression 9E, and a developing low near Mexico.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
> View larger image
This is a "full-disk" image of the Earth taken from the GOES-11 satellite at 8 a.m. EDT on Aug. 12.
Credit: NASA/GOES Project
GOES-11 Satellite Captures a Very Busy Central and Eastern Pacific Ocean

The GOES-11 satellite is getting a lot of business today, August 12. There are four areas of tropical interest between the Central and the Eastern Pacific Ocean today: two near Hawaii and two from a couple hundred to a thousand miles off the Mexican coast, and GOES-11 captured them all in one image.

GOES-11, or the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. creates some of the GOES images, and they made a stunning image that captures four current areas of interest in the Pacific.

Farthest west lies a new tropical depression in the Central Pacific called Maka. Maka has sustained winds near 35 mph, but is expected to strengthen into a tropical storm as it starts to turn toward the northwest near 12 mph. Maka formed late on Tues. August 11 and 5 a.m. EDT on Aug.ust 12, it was located far to the west-southwest of Honolulu, Hawaii, about 1,125 miles from there. That puts its center near 14.6 north and 173.5 west, also 305 miles west-southwest of Johnston Island.

Moving eastward, and located to Maka's northeast is what is left of the once powerful Felicia. She's now a remnant low pressure system, and is located just east of Maui and the Alenuihaha Channel within the main Hawaiian island chain. The low will move west very slowly over the next couple of days, and isn't expected to redevelop.

The third tropical area is Tropical Depression 9E (TD9E), lingering in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. TD9E is poorly organized and isn't expected to strengthen over the next day, but may become a tropical storm at sea over the weekend. At 11 a.m. EDT on August 12, TD9E's center was located about 1,590 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, near 14.6 north and 132.6 west. Its maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph, and it was moving 14 mph toward the west. Minimum central pressure is 1007 millibars.

Farthest east in the Pacific, and closest to mainland Mexico is a broad low pressure area that looks pretty significant on satellite imagery. It's about 600 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California and moving west-northwest near about 12 mph. The storm is expected to strengthen into a tropical depression and get a name soon.

The GOES-11 satellite captured all four areas of tropical activity in one stunning image at 8 a.m. EDT on August 12. It's a busy season in the eastern Pacific and GOES is watching.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center