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Hurricane Season 2009: Tropical Storm Krovanh (Western Pacific)
09.01.09
 
September 1, 2009

AIRS visible image from Sept. 1 at 0341 UTCshows the clouds of extra-tropical storm Krovanh. > View larger image
AIRS visible image from Sept. 1 at 0341 UTC (Aug. 31 at 11:41 p.m. EDT) shows the clouds of extra-tropical storm Krovanh, located to the northeast of Japan.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
QuikScat captured Krovanh's maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph) on Sept. 1 at 4:25 a.m. EDT. > View larger image
QuikScat captured Krovanh's maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph) on Sept. 1 at 4:25 a.m. EDT (08:25utc). Highest winds are in the purple area, and white barbs point to areas of heavy rain, which are concentrated in the northeastern quadrant of the storm.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Peter Falcon
Extra-Tropical Krovanh Moving Away from Japan

NASA's Aqua and QuikScat satellites flew over extra-tropical storm Krovanh earlier today, September 1, and noticed the storm had already moved northeast of Japan, and winds were waning.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible image that clearly showed extra-tropical storm Krovanh's clouds were located to the northeast of Japan.

The final advisory on the system was issued yesterday, when Krovanh's center was 140 miles southeast of Misawa, Japan. It has since moved north-northeast and is located off-shore of northeastern Japan.

QuikScat captured Krovanh's maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph) on Sept. 1 at 4:25 a.m. EDT (08:25 UTC). Twenty-four hours prior, maximum sustained winds were near 55 knots (63 mph). Krovanh's highest winds were located around the center of circulation and the areas of heaviest rain were concentrated in the northeastern quadrant of the storm.

Krovanh is an extra-tropical storm that will start tracking eastward into the open waters of the Western Pacific Ocean over the next couple of days where the storm will degenerate into a remnant low pressure area.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center













August 31, 2009

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Krovanh on August 29 at 11:53 p.m. > View larger image
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Krovanh on August 29 at 11:53 p.m., it captured an infrared image of the storm's cold cloud top temperatures, as cold as minus 63F.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Tropical Storm Krovanh's center just to the southeast of Japan last night at 10:20 p.m. EDT. > View larger image
This visible image from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured Tropical Storm Krovanh's center just to the southeast of Japan last night at 10:20 p.m. EDT. The storm is still bringing gusty winds and heavy rains to Japan today.
Credit: NASA/MODIS Rapid Response Team
NASA Satellite's See Clouds of Tropical Storm Krovanh Near Japan

Tropical Storm Krovanh is bringing some heavy rains and gusty winds, up to tropical storm force, to Japan's central east coast as the storm brushes by and starts heading out to sea.

On Monday, August 31, Tropical storm Krovanh has sustained winds near 50 knots (57 mph) and is located approximately 94 miles east-northeast of Tokyo, Japan, near 36.3 north and 141.5 east. The tropical storm has tracked north-northeastward at 18 knots (20 mph).

The Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured Tropical Storm Krovanh's center just to the southeast of Japan late last night. The storm was bringing tropical storm force winds and heavy rains to the east coast of central Japan today, August 31.

When NASA's Aqua satellite also passed over Krovanh on August 29 at 11:53 p.m., it captured an infrared image of the storm's cloud top temperatures. Cloud-top temperatures are important because they tell forecasters how high thunderstorms are, and the higher the thunderstorm, the more powerful it is. In infrared imagery, NASA's false-colored purple clouds are as cold as or colder than 220 Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The blue colored clouds are about 240 Kelvin, or minus 27F. That data from late August 29 revealed high thunderstorm cloud tops with temperatures as cold as minus 63 F, indicating strong convection.

Krovanh continues to accelerate to the north-northeast and will pull away from Japan as it begins to transition into an extra-tropical storm.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center