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Hurricane Season 2009: Typhoon Grace (Eastern Atlantic)
10.06.09
 
October 6, 2009

AIRS image of an elongated Grace on October 5 at 10:59 EDT › Larger image
NASA's AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of an elongated Grace on October 5 at 10:59 EDT that resembles more of a cold front than a tropical storm (the blue area that stretches diagonally from Ireland, southwest into the Atlantic Ocean. You can still see the swirl of Grace's center of circulation off-shore.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
Remnants of Tropical Storm Grace Raining on Southern Ireland

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. issued its final advisory on Tropical Storm Grace on October 5 at 8 p.m. EDT, but the residents in Ireland are feeling her rains and gusty winds.

At 11 p.m. EDT on October 5, Grace's center was located near 49.7 North and 13.4 West, about 210 miles southwest of Cork, Ireland, and moving north-northeast near 26 mph. Grace still had maximum sustained winds near 52 mph and higher gusts, and was creating 12 foot-high seas. Her minimum central pressure was 986 millibars. Tropical storm-force winds of 37 mph extend 85 miles out from Grace's center.

By 8 a.m. EDT this morning, October 6, Grace's circulation was officially absorbed by a cold front moving through the region. That absorption is evident on NASA's Aqua satellite imagery as Grace's remnants appeared stretched from northeast to southwest. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite and it captured an infrared image of an elongated Grace on October 6 at 0259 UTC (October 5 at 10:59 EDT) that resembles more of a cold front than a tropical storm.

For a look at Ireland's live satellite radar, click here.

At 10 a.m. EDT (3 p.m. Europe/Dublin Time), Cork, Ireland, was reporting light rain and 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Winds were from the north-northeast near 17 mph, and the barometric pressure was near 29.53 inches and steady. The local forecast for Cork, Ireland on Wednesday calls for sunshine to return as the front continues on its eastward journey with the leftover energy from Grace.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center



October 5, 2009

AIRS infrared image of Tropical Storm Grace's clouds on October 4 at 10:17 a.m. EDT › Larger image
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of Tropical Storm Grace's clouds on October 4 at 10:17 a.m. EDT. At the time of this image, Grace had not yet come together as her clouds (purple as cold as -63F) had not yet organized into the signature tropical storm shaped-swirl.
Credit: NASA/JPL, Ed Olsen
A Sudden Tropical Storm Grace Explodes in Far Eastern Atlantic

The latest tropical storm in the Atlantic Ocean may have escaped the notice of most when it formed just before midnight last night so far north and east in the Atlantic, away from where forecasters usually look for forming storms. However, NASA's Aqua satellite and forecasters in the Azores Islands, Portugal and Ireland are watching it closely.

Grace came together quickly and her winds were near 65 mph soon after formation. Very early this morning those sustained winds peaked at 70 mph, but fell back to 65 mph. Grace's existence will be short-lived as she's expected to merge with another low pressure area.

It was late last night, October 4 at around 11 p.m. EDT, when Tropical Storm Grace formed about 420 miles northeast of the Azores, near 41.2 North and 20.3 West. By 5 a.m. today, October 5, was speeding north-northeast between the Azores and the British Isles.

Grace had moved to a position about 575 miles southwest of Cork Ireland, and about 590 miles northwest of Lisbon, Portugal near 45.4 North and 16.4 West. Her maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph, and she was speeding northeast near 31 mph. Estimated minimum central pressure is 990 millibars.

NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured an infrared image of Grace's clouds on October 4 at 10:17 a.m. EDT more than 12 hours before she came together as a tropical storm. In the infrared imagery, which measures cloud top temperatures, there were some strong areas of convection, but the storm didn't yet have the signature appearance of a tropical storm. However, the storm quickly organized.

AIRS infrared imagery measures temperatures in the clouds, and found a few of the highest thunderstorm cloud tops were cold as -63 Fahrenheit, indicating some isolated strong convection even before the storm came together.

Grace is expected to be absorbed by a large non-tropical low pressure area over the northeastern Atlantic during the day sometime tomorrow and bring rainfall to Ireland.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center