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Hurricane Season 2009: Two Caribbean Lows (Atlantic)
07.24.09
 
July 24, 2009

Giant Low Over Northern New England Today

The satellite image shows the huge low over the U.S. northeast. > View larger image
GOES-12 captured the huge low pressure area on July 24 at 10:31 a.m. EDT (1431 UTC). The satellite image shows the huge low over the U.S. northeast. It is expected to move into the Canadian Maritimes this weekend.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
The two areas of thunderstorms that combined over the Caribbean earlier this week are now in the form of a huge low pressure area, currently over northern New England and bringing heavy rains to central and southern New Hampshire, and Maine today, July 24. Rainfall in excess of 2 inches are possible, triggering a flood watch in those areas.

Although it never became tropical, forecasters were keeping a close eye on it. Now, it's raining over eastern Maine. In fact, there's a coastal flood watch up for all of Maine, as a strong northeast flow will cause tides to run about a foot above astronomical tides today. The low will exit into the Canadian Maritimes on Saturday. For live radar of the Maine Coast: http://radar.weather.gov/radar.php?rid=GYX&product=NCR&overlay=11101111&loop=yes.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellite, GOES-12 captured a satellite snapshot of the clouds and thunderstorms on Friday, July 24. GOES is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates some of the satellite images from the GOES satellites.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, tropical cyclone formation isn't expected over the weekend.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



July 23, 2009

Two Atlantic Disturbances Merge into One

GOES-12 captured the merged area of shower and thunderstorms on July 23 at 7:01 a.m. EDT. > View larger image
GOES-12 captured the merged area of shower and thunderstorms on July 23 at 7:01 a.m. EDT. The satellite image shows one huge comma-like cloud formation east of Florida's east coast.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
The two areas of thunderstorms in the Atlantic have now merged into one huge area of clouds and showers. It is located north of the Bahamas. The National Hurricane Center said that there is a low chance (30%) of the storms organizing into anything of a (sub) tropical nature. It would be considered subtropical, because it would take on tropical characteristics outside of the tropics.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellite, GOES-12 grabbed another satellite snapshot of the two areas of thunderstorms on Thursday, July 23 at 7:01 a.m. EDT (1101 UTC). The satellite image shows one huge comma-like cloud formation east of Florida's east coast and trailing into the northern Bahamas.

The area is associated with a weak surface trough (an elongated area of low pressure), and that's interacting with an upper-level low. The National Hurricane Center noted that "there are no signs of a surface circulation and upper-level winds are forecast to become less favorable for development. This activity is expected to move northward or northeastward at about 20 mph over the next day or so."

GOES is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates some of the satellite images from the GOES satellites.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, tropical cyclone formation isn't expected fro another 48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



July 22, 2009

Still a Low Chance of Development for Two Lows

Two comma-like cloud formations, one east of Florida's east coast, and the other with its > View larger image
GOES-11 captured the lows on July 22 at 10:31 a.m. EDT (1431 UTC). The satellite image shows two comma-like cloud formations, one east of Florida's east coast, and the other with its "tail" over Hispaniola.
Credit: NASA GOES Project
The two areas of thunderstorms in the Caribbean from yesterday, July 21, are on the move. One area is now moving into out of the Caribbean and into the eastern Atlantic Ocean while the other is now moving over the southeastern Bahamas and Hispaniola on a northwest track.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellite, GOES-11 grabbed another satellite snapshot of the two areas of thunderstorms on Wednesday, July 22. The satellite image shows two comma-like cloud formations, one east of Florida's east coast, and the other with its "tail" over Hispaniola.

Showers and thunderstorms that are closest to the U.S. mainland are showing less of a chance of developing into something tropical. They're located from the northern Bahamas northward into the Atlantic Ocean and span several hundred miles. That group of storms is associated with a weak surface trough, that is, an elongated area of low pressure. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. says that there is a low chance of development, less than 30 percent now, of any further development into something tropical because the air pressure on the surface is high. This area of showers and thunderstorms is forecast to move along the U.S. East coast bringing showers to the coastline from Delaware north to New England before it moves to sea.

The second area of disorganized showers and thunderstorms has spread over the eastern Caribbean including southeastern Bahamas and Hispaniola. That group of storms is associated with a tropical wave. This tropical wave is moving northwest near 20-25 mph.

Tropical waves in the Atlantic Ocean are an elongated area of low pressure, also called a "trough." They consist of clouds and thunderstorms and stretch from north to south and move west across the Atlantic Ocean, originating off the African coast. They are generated or enhanced by the African Easterly Jet stream. They can lead to the formation of tropical cyclones in the north Atlantic and northeast Pacific basins.

The National Hurricane Center noted that upper-level winds remain unfavorable for this group of storms to develop into a tropical depression in the next day or two. Further, interaction with land also inhibits organization of a tropical cyclone, because they draw their power from warm tropical waters. There is less than 30 percent of this system becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours.

GOES is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. creates some of the satellite images from the GOES satellites.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, tropical cyclone formation isn't expected for another two days, but GOES-11 is watching.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



July 21, 2009

GOES Satellite Eyeing Two Areas of Thunderstorms in Eastern Caribbean

Two areas of thunderstorms that each has a 30% chance of developing into something tropical. > View larger image
This GOES-11 satellite image shows two areas of thunderstorms that each has a 30% chance of developing into something tropical. One area is in the lower right corner, the other just to the northeast of Cuba.
Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Two Geostationary Operational Environmental (GOES) satellites keep a weather eye on the eastern and western U.S. While GOES-11 watches the west, GOES-12 is watching the east, and two areas of thunderstorms in the eastern Caribbean for possible tropical development.

Thunderstorms associated with a tropical wave over the eastern Caribbean Sea have increased in activity today, and they're bringing locally heavy rainfall and gusty winds to parts of the Lesser Antilles, Virgin Islands, and parts of Puerto Rico today. Upper level winds are keeping a tropical low pressure area from developing. The storms area associated with a tropical wave that continues to move northwesterly near 15-20 mph. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Fla. gives this area a 30 percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next two days.

Meanwhile, closer to the U.S., showers and thunderstorms have become more concentrated near the Northern Bahamas Islands. That area also has only 30 percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone in the next 48 hours as well, but it's because surface pressure is high in the area and currently, there is no sign of organization.

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GOES-12 captured the two areas of low pressure in a visible satellite image on July 21 at 10:31 a.m. EDT. GOES satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The image was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center