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Hurricane Season 2009: Tropical Depression 25W (Western Pacific)
11.09.09
 
November 09, 2009

The AIRS instrument captured this visible image of 25W dying. > View larger image NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Depression 25W on November 9 at 02:17 UTC and the AIRS instrument captured this visible image of the dying storm. The storm appeared oval-shaped instead of rounded.
Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
NASA Satellite Captures the End of Tropical Depression 25W's Short Life

The twenty-fifth tropical depression formed in the western Pacific Ocean this weekend, and just as the week is getting under way, the depression is already fading. NASA's Aqua satellite confirmed the storm's disorganization in visible imagery of the storm's shape.

Tropical depression 25W (TD25W) was out at sea and away from land today, November 9, when it was starting to weaken due to battering winds. It was located 435 miles west-northwest of Wake Island, near 20.6 North and 160.5 East. Wake Island is a coral atoll with a 12 mile long coastline in the north western Pacific Ocean. It's about 2,300 miles west of Honolulu, Hawaii and 1,510 miles east of Guam.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Depression 25W on November 9 at 02:17 UTC and the AIRS instrument captured a visible image of the dying storm. AIRS imagery showed that the storm appeared as an oval shape instead of the signature rounded form of a powerful tropical cyclone.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center, the organization the forecasts tropical cyclones in that area of the world, issued their final warning on 25W this morning at 4 a.m. ET. At that time, 25W still had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph), although wind shear (winds blowing at different levels of the atmosphere that tear a storm apart) continues to weaken 25W. 25W's center continues to move in an east-southeast direction near 10 mph, and was kicking up waves up to 10 feet high.

Wind shear is increasing in the area that Tropical Depression 25W is moving toward, and the storm is expected to dissipate in the next 24-48 hours.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center