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Hurricane Season 2008: Odile (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
 
Oct. 14, 2008

Holiday Weekend Too Much for Norbert and Odile in Eastern Pacific

There's nothing like a holiday weekend to wear a tropical storm out. At least that's what it seems has happened over the Columbus Day holiday with the storms Norbert and Odile.

Norbert Dissipates in Northern Mexico

On Sunday, Oct. 12, the remnants of Norbert were dissipating over the mountains of northern Mexico. The storm uprooted trees, caused widespread flooding and destroyed roofs from homes and businesses while moving inland from the eastern Pacific Ocean. Mexican authorities reported at least four deaths from flooding in the town of Alamos. By Monday, Oct. 13, Norbert's remnants were dumping moderate rain on west Texas.

Hurricane Norbert made landfall near Puerto Charley on the southwest coast of Baja California around 930 a.m. PDT on Saturday, Oct. 11, with estimated maximum winds of 105 mph or category two strength on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale.

Odile Dissipates off the Southwestern Mexico Coast

Tropical Storm Odile weakened to a tropical depression by Monday, Oct. 13 off the southwest coast of Mexico. The National Hurricane Center's last advisory on the storm was on Sunday, Oct. 12. During the morning hours on Oct. 12, Odile was about 100 kilometers (62 miles) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico with winds near 65 kilometers per hour (40 mph). According to the Associated Press, Odile flooded about 200 homes in the Acapulco area before fading away.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



Oct. 10, 2008

Odile Hugs Western Mexican Coast

Satellite image of Odile Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab
> Larger image
Residents along Mexico's Pacific coast will be watching Tropical Storm Odile all weekend, as it continues to track north and hug the coast and it could strengthen.

On Friday, October 10, a tropical storm warning was in effect from Lagunas de Chacahua Westward to Zihuatanejo. The National Hurricane Center said that as Odile continues northward, it could produce rainfall accumulations of 2 to 4 inches over portions of southern Mexico with isolated amounts of 8 inches possible. These rains could result in life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.

On Oct. 10 at 2 p.m. EDT, Odile was about 180 miles southeast of Acapulco, Mexico, near latitude 14.9 north and 97.9 west. Odile had sustained winds near 60 mph and will continue to strengthen over Oct. 11 and 12. Odile is moving west-northwest near 11 mph keeping Odile's center offshore from the pacific Mexican coast. Minimum central pressure was 997 millibars.

NASA's Aqua Satellite Takes Cloud Temperatures

This infrared image was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. This was taken October 10 at 8:11 UTC (4:11 a.m. EDT). The image shows the tallest and coldest clouds are on the storm's northwest and southeast sides (in blue and purple). Despite looking like two separate storms, the two circular areas are all part of Odile.

The infrared image shows a huge temperature difference between the tops of the clouds in the tropical cyclone and the warm ocean waters that power it. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the area of low pressure. Those temperatures are as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The blue areas are around 240 degrees Kelvin, or minus 27F.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the ocean and land surfaces, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red. The orange temperatures are 80F (300 degrees Kelvin) or greater (the darker they are, the warmer they are), and tropical cyclones need sea surface temperatures of 80F to strengthen and maintain their strength.

The data from AIRS is also used to create an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro (from NHC reports), NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



Oct. 9, 2008

Tropical Storm Odile Born Near Central America

Satellite image of Odile Credit: NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab
> Larger image
The 16th tropical depression in the eastern Pacific Ocean formed on October 8 at around 5 p.m. EDT, near the El Salvador-Nicaragua border. Twelve hours later it strengthened enough to get the name Odile.

At 5 a.m. Oct. 10, Odile had maximum sustained winds near 40 mph and was moving west-northwest near 12 mph. Odile was located near latitude 12.7 degrees north and longitude 93.0 degrees west. Minimum central pressure was 1005 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center forecast track calls for the center of Tropical Storm Odile to move parallel to, but remain offshore of the Pacific coast of Mexico.

NASA's Aqua Satellite Takes Cloud Temperatures

This infrared image was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. This was taken October 9 at 7:23 UTC (3:23 a.m. EDT).

The infrared image shows a huge temperature difference between the tops of the clouds in the tropical cyclone and the warm ocean waters that power it. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the area of low pressure. Those temperatures are as cold as or colder than 220 degrees Kelvin or minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The blue areas are around 240 degrees Kelvin, or minus 27F.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the ocean and land surfaces, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red. The orange temperatures are 80F (300 degrees Kelvin) or greater (the darker they are, the warmer they are), and tropical cyclones need sea surface temperatures of 80F to strengthen and maintain their strength.

The data from AIRS is also used to create an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

Text credit: Rob Gutro (from NHC reports), NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center