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Hurricane Season 2008: Tropical Storm Nuri (Western Pacific)
 
August 22, 2008

Tropical Storm Nuri Slams Into Hong Kong, Heads Further Inland in China

Tropical Storm Nuri over Hong Kong Credit: NASA JPL
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Tropical Storm Nuri made landfall by tracking directly over Hong Kong on August 22. According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Hong Kong reported sustained winds of 41 knots (47 mph), with gusts to 54 knots (62 mph). Nuri is now making its way on a west-northwesterly track further into China after its landfall on Friday, Aug. 22 at 9:00 Zulu Time (5:00 a.m. EDT).

According to the South China Morning Post, authorities on the Chinese mainland ordered the evacuation of 250,000 people from coastal areas in the southern Guangdong province. The Agence France-Press reported that Hing Kong courts and financial markets were all closed. Further the Hong Kong Airport Authority reported that over 300 flights had been cancelled, delayed or redirected.

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Cloud Temperatures

The top satellite image of Nuri was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite. It shows the temperature of Nuri's cloud tops on Aug. 21, 18:11 UTC (2:11 p.m. EDT) as it was approaching China's southeast coast. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up Nuri's center. There are large areas of strong convection (rising air and rainfall) shown here in purple. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth (over both land and water), revealing warmer temperatures (red).

A sideways view of Nuri from NASA's CloudSat satellite Credit: NASA JPL/Colorado State University/Naval Research Laboratory-Monterey
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NASA'S CloudSat Gives a Side View of Nuri

NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Nuri on August 21 at 18:30 UTC (2:30 p.m. EDT).

The top image is from the MTSAT satellite, supplied through the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and shows the top of Nuri at the same time as the CloudSat image below it, shows what Nuri looked like sideways.

The red line through the MTSAT satellite image shows the vertical cross section of radar, basically what Nuri's clouds looked like sideways. The colors indicate the intensity of the reflected radar energy. The top of Nuri's clouds are almost 16 kilometers (10 miles) high!

The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice, while the wavy blue lines on the bottom center of the image indicate intense rainfall. Notice that the solid line along the bottom of the panel, which is the ground, disappears in this area of intense precipitation. It is likely that in the area the precipitation rate exceeds 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour) based on previous studies.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



August 20, 2008

NASA Gazes at Typhoon Nuri with Three Satellites as it Heads to China

AIRS image of Nuri on August 20, 2008 Credit: NASA/JPL
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Typhoon Nuri is headed to China and NASA is keeping tabs on it. Three NASA satellites recently captured images of Nuri, and enabled forecasters to look at cloud temperatures, cloud heights and wind speeds.

During the early morning hours (Eastern Time) on Wed. Aug. 20, Nuri was a Category Two typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale, with maximum sustained winds near 90 knots (103 mph). At 2:00 a.m. EDT on Aug. 20, Nuri was located near 18.9 degrees north latitude, and 121.1 degrees east longitude. That's approximately 440 nautical miles east-southeast of Hong Kong. Nuri has been tracking west-northwest at 8 knots (9 mph), on a track toward China.

NASA's Aqua Satellite Sees Cloud Temperatures

The top satellite image of Nuri was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite. It shows the temperature of Nuri's cloud tops on Aug. 20, 5:17 UTC (1:17 a.m. EDT) as it was exiting the Philippines. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up Nuri's center. There are large areas of strong convection (rising air and rainfall) shown here in purple. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth (over both land and water), revealing warmer temperatures (red).

Quikscat image of Nuri on August 20, 2008 Credit: NASA/JPL
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QuikSCAT Watching Nuri's Winds

Looking back in time one day, Nuri's circulation was readily apparent in this satellite image from NASA's QuikSCAT satellite. QuikSCAT has been watching Nuri's winds, by using microwaves to peer into the clouds. QuikSCAT can determine the speed of the rotating winds. This image shows Nuri's wind speeds in different colors and wind direction are indicated by small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. The highest wind speeds, are shown in purple, which indicate winds over 40 knots (46 mph). This image was captured on Aug. 18 at 19:16 UTC (3:16 p.m. EDT).

NASA'S CloudSat Gives a Side View of Nuri

NASA's CloudSat satellite's Cloud Profiling Radar captured a sideways look across Nuri on August 16 at 16:24 UTC (12:14 p.m. EDT).

The top image is from the MTSAT satellite, supplied through the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and shows the top of Nuri at the same time as the CloudSat image below it, shows what Nuri looked like sideways.

Cloudsat image of Nuri on August 20, 2008 Credit: NASA/JPL/Colorado State University/Naval Research Laboratory-Monterey
> Larger image
The red line through the MTSAT satellite image shows the vertical cross section of radar, basically what Nuri's clouds looked like sideways. The colors indicate the intensity of the reflected radar energy. The top of Nuri's clouds are almost 16 kilometers (10 miles) high!

The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicate cloud ice, while the wavy blue lines on the bottom center of the image indicate intense rainfall. Notice that the solid line along the bottom of the panel, which is the ground, disappears in this area of intense precipitation. It is likely that in the area the precipitation rate exceeds 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour) based on previous studies.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center




Aug. 18, 2008

Typhoon Nuri Forms in Western Pacific

AIRS image of Tropical Storm Nuri in the Western Pacific Credit: NASA JPL
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Typhoon Nuri is the 13th tropical cyclone to form in the far western Pacific Ocean this year.

On Monday, August 18, 2008 at 12:00 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Nuri was located near 16.4 degrees north latitude and 129.9 degrees east longitude, or approximately 530 nm east-northeast of manila, Philippines.

Nuri was packing winds of 65 knots (74 mph) with higher gusts, making it a Category one typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson scale. Nuri, however, appears to be strengthening.

Typhoon Nuri has tracked westward at 15 knots over the past 6 hours. Maximum significant wave heights being generated with this storm is 15 feet. Nuri is expected to skirt the northern tip of the Philippines big island, travel south of Taiwan, and make landfall in mainland China, far north of Hong Kong.

This infrared image of Nuri was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on August 17 at 16:59 UTC (12:59 p.m. EDT).

The AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Nuri. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the ocean and land surfaces, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro
Goddard Space Flight Center