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Hurricane Season 2008: Kamba (Indian Ocean)
03.07.08
 


March 10, 2008

Cyclone 23S Now Powerful Cyclone Kamba

Satellite image of Tropical Cyclone Kamba Credit: NASA/JPL
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Kamba was just a tropical depression last week, and as of March 10, is a hurricane in the southern Indian Ocean. Kamba was packing sustained winds near 110 knots (126 mph) with gusts to 135 knots (155 mph).

At 12:00 Zulu Time, or 8:00 a.m. EDT, Kamba was located near 18.1 degrees south latitude and 78.6 degrees east longitude, or 740 nautical miles south-southeast of Diego Garcia. Kamba has been moving south-southwesterly at 14 knots (16 mph). Kamba's strong winds are creating 35-foot high waves.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Kamba has continued to intensify over the last 12 hours, because of low wind shear (winds moving in different directions at different levels of the atmosphere that tear storms apart) and warm ocean waters.

This visible image of Cyclone Kamba was created on March 10 at 7:53 UTC (3:53 a.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. Kamba is in the center left of the image, and its eye is clearly visible, indicating a strong storm.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



March 7, 2008

Tropical Cyclone 23S forms in the Southern Indian Ocean

Satellite image of Tropical Cyclone 23S Credit: NASA/JPL
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Forecasters are watching Tropical Cyclone 23S, now spinning in the southern Indian Ocean, in addition to Jokwe and Ophelia.

On March 7 at 15:00 Zulu time (10:00 a.m. EDT) Cyclone 23S was located near 11.9 degrees south latitude, and 86.9 degrees east longitude, or approximately 910 nautical miles east-southeast of Diego Garcia. 23S has tracked west-northwest and will begin tracking to the west-southwest in the next couple of days. The cyclone is currently generating maximum wave heights near 15 feet.

This visible image of 23S was created on March 7 at 7:23 UTC (2:23 a.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. Cyclone 23S is located in on the left side of the center in this satellite image.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center