Featured Images

Text Size

Hurricane Season 2008: Hurricane Iselle (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
 
Aug. 15, 2008

Tropical Storm Iselle No Threat to Land in Eastern Pacific

AIRS image of Iselle
Credit: NASA/JPL
> Larger image
You wouldn't know Tropical Storm Iselle was out in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific unless you were using a satellite or on a boat in the shipping lanes. However, Iselle continues to churn at sea and will do so over the weekend of August 16-17.

On Friday, August 15, at 11:00 a.m. EDT, the center of Tropical Storm Iselle was located near latitude 17.7 north and longitude 111.4 west or about 370 miles (600 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

Iselle is moving toward the west-northwest near 5 mph (7 km/hr) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 48 hours.

Maximum sustained winds are near 40 mph (65 km/hr) with higher gusts. Gradual weakening is expected during the next 48 hours and Iselle could become a tropical depression later today. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1004 millibars.

This infrared image of Iselle was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on August 15 at 8:59 UTC (4:59 a.m. EDT).

The AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Tropical Storm Iselle. The AIRS data creates an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Aug. 14, 2008

Tropical Storm Iselle Spinning off Western Mexican Coast

Tropical Storm Iselle south of Baja California GOES-11 keeps a watchful eye on Tropical Storm Iselle in the Eastern Pacific. To see Iselle in action, click the movie link below.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
> Watch video
No sooner did Tropical Storm Hernan fade, than another one has appeared. Tropical Storm Iselle formed on August 13 in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, and is expected to stay at sea.

At 8:00 a.m. PDT on Thursday, August 14, the center of Tropical Storm Iselle was located near latitude 17.8 north and longitude 109.4 west or about 355 miles (570 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California.

Iselle is moving toward the northwest near 8 mph (13 km/hr) and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. By Saturday, Iselle is expected to gradually turn west-northwest, and remain off-shore.

Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph (85 km/hr) with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 24 hours with gradual weakening expected thereafter. Estimated minimum central pressure is 999 millibars.

This movie was created using satellite imagery was captured on August 14 from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-11), which is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center