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Hurricane Season 2008: Typhoon Halong (Pacific Ocean)
05.16.08
 
May 19, 2008

Japan Expected to be Spared Direct Hit from Tropical Storm Halong

Satellite image of Halong Credit: NASA/JPL
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Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center have come out with a revised forecast, much to the delight of residents on the big island of Japan. Early computer models on Friday, May 16 indicated that Tropical Storm Halong could make a direct hit this week. The latest computer model runs on Monday, May 19, 2008 indicate that Halong will now stay offshore and move parallel to the island in a northeasterly direction, and not making landfall in the country.

The reason for the shift in track is that Halong is tracking northeastward along the northwestern edge of a subtropical steering ridge to the east and a mid-latitude trough (an elongated area of low pressure) to the west.

At 15:00 Zulu Time (11:00 a.m. EDT), Halong was packing maximum sustained winds near 55 knots (63 mph). At that time, Halong was located near 24.3 degrees north latitude and 131.8 degrees east longitude, or 225 nautical miles southeast of Naha, Okinawa. Halong is zipping along at 21 knots (24 mph) and generating 17 foot high waves.

This infrared image of Halong was created on May 18 at 17:17 Zulu Time (1:17 p.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Halong. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the warm surface of the Earth and warm waters (red). The islands of the Philippines are located to the southwest of the storm.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



May 16, 2008

Tropical Storm Halong Expected to Cross Japan Next Week

AIRS image of Tropical Storm HalongCredit: NASA/JPL
> Larger image
Typhoon Halong is currently swirling in the South China Sea west of the Philippines, but is forecast to take a northeast track into the western Pacific and by May 20 is forecast to be over the main island of Japan.

On Friday, May 16 at 15:00 Zulu time, or 11:00 a.m. EDT, Tropical Storm Halong was packing sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph). It was located near 15.0 degrees north latitude and 118.0 degrees east longitude, or approximately 200 nautical miles west of the city of Manila, the Philippines. Halong has tracked northward at 5 knots (5 mph) and its generating maximum wave heights at 13 feet.

This infrared image of Halong was created on May 15 at 5:17 Zulu Time (1:17 a.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Halong. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the warm surface of the Earth and warm waters (red). The islands of the Philippines are located to the right of the storm (round blue and purple area).

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center