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Hurricane Season 2008: Tropical Storm Genevieve (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
 
July 28, 2008

Genevieve Fizzling Fast

Genevieve was a hurricane at the end of last week, and now, Monday, July 28, 2008, it's a fading memory.

The National Hurricane Center issued its final advisory on Genevieve on Sunday, July 27 at 5:00 a.m. EDT and noted that deep convection (strong currents of rising air that help form thunderstorms and keep a storm going) were absent for over eight hours.

At that time, sustained winds were estimated around 30 knots (34 mph) and dropping off as it was entering cooler waters. It takes sea surface temperatures of at least 80 F to help a tropical cyclone maintain strength, and the waters it was entering we cooler than that.

Its center continued to head westward into the open waters as it continued to fade.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



July 23, 2008

Genevieve Becomes Fourth Hurricane of the Eastern Pacific Season

Genevieve southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico Credit: NASA/JPL
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Genevieve is now a hurricane out in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is currently no threat to land as she heads west-northwest.

On July 25th at 11:00 a.m. EDT, Genevieve's center was about 585 miles southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 16.4 degrees north latitude and 115.7 degrees west. Genevieve is moving toward the west-northwest near 12 mph, and expected to continue that way for a couple of days.

She's a category one hurricane, with maximum sustained winds are near 75 mph, and little change in strength is forecast, although she could weaken over the weekend. The estimated minimum central pressure is 987 millibars.

This infrared image of Genevieve was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on July 23 at 8:53 UTC (4:53 a.m. EDT).

The AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Genevieve. The AIRS data creates an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



July 23, 2008

Genevieve May Build to Hurricane Strength in Eastern Pacific

AIRS image of Genevieve southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico Credit: NASA/JPL
> Larger image
Although Tropical Storm Genevieve is out in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific, freighters and other ships need to take heed, as she's poised to strengthen later today, July 23, 2008.

At 2:00 a.m. PDT, the center of Tropical Storm Genevieve was located near latitude 14.7 north and longitude 108.7 west or about 415 miles (670 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

Genevieve is moving toward the west near 9 mph (15 km/hr) and this general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph (100 km/hr) with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 24 hours and Genevieve could be at or near hurricane strength later today. Estimated minimum central pressure is 994 millibars.

This infrared image was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on July 22 at 20:35 UTC (4:35 p.m. EDT).

The AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Genevieve. The AIRS data creates an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center