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Hurricane Season 2008: Hurricane Fausto (Eastern Pacific)
07.21.08
 
July 22, 2008

Tropical Storm Fausto Safely Out to Sea in Eastern Pacific

AIRS image of Fausto over open water Credit: NASA/JPL
> Larger image
On Tuesday, July 22, 2008, Tropical Storm Fausto is more than 600 miles west of land and frolicking in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

At 2:00 a.m. PDT the center of Tropical Storm Fausto was located near latitude 20.7 north and longitude 119.6 west or about 640 miles west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 60 mph with higher gusts.

Fausto is moving toward the west near 12 mph and this general motion is expected to continue during the next couple of days. Estimated minimum central pressure is 997 millibars.

The National Hurricane Center noted in its discussion, that Fausto is "now over cold water and with little chance of regenerating significant deep convection, so additional weakening of Fausto is expected. It would appear that the cyclone is well on its way to remnant low status later today."

This visible image of Fausto was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on July 21 at 21:35 UTC (5:35 p.m. EDT). Fausto is the circular area of clouds in the top right corner of the image.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, Goddard Space Flight Center



July 21, 2008

Hurricane Fausto Weakening in Eastern Pacific Open Waters

AIRS image of Hurricane Fausto Credit: NASA/JPL
> Larger image
Hurricane Fausto is out in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific Ocean and weakening, according to the National Hurricane Center's on-line discussion on July 21.

The tropical depression that became Hurricane Fausto formed in the early morning hours of Wednesday, July 16 (2:00 a.m. PDT), about 560 miles southeast of Acapulco, Mexico.

By Monday, July 21 at 8:00 a.m. PDT, Fausto continued moving away from Mexico and was located 475 miles west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, near 20.4 north latitude and 116.8 west longitude. Fausto is on a west-northwest track at 15 mph, and is expected to slow down in the next couple of days.

He's a Category One hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale with maximum sustained winds near 80 mph. Fausto is expected to weaken over the next two days. His estimated minimum central pressure is 984 millibars.

This infrared image of Fausto was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on July 21 at 8:59 UTC (1:59 a.m. PDT) when Fausto was a Category 2 storm with peak winds of 85 knots (97 mph).

The AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Fausto. The AIRS data creates an accurate 3-D map of atmospheric temperature, water vapor and clouds, all of which are helpful to forecasters.

The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, Goddard Space Flight Center