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Hurricane Season 2008: Tropical Storm Boris (Eastern Pacific Ocean)
06.27.08
 
July 3, 2008

AIRS image of Tropical Storms Boris and DouglasCredit: NASA JPL
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Tropical Storms Boris and Douglas Team Up in the Eastern Pacific

Two tropical storms are active in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for the Fourth of July Weekend, and another appears to be ready to form. Tropical Storm Douglas is just south of Baja California, while Tropical Storm Boris is in the open waters of the Eastern Pacific and headed further west. Out ahead of Boris, what was once Tropical Storm Cristina has now dissipated. Now, forecasters are watching another area for development off the western Mexican coast.

Boris Expected to Fizzle Over Weekend

Tropical Storm Boris, once a hurricane, continues to weaken and will do so over the 4th of July weekend. At 2:00 a.m. PDT (9:00 Zulu Time) on July 3, the center of Tropical Storm Boris was located near latitude 17.3 north...longitude 128.6 west or about 1,270 miles (2,050 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Boris' maximum sustained winds were down to 50 mph (85 km/hr) and expected to weaken into a Tropical Depression on Friday, July 4th, Independence Day.

Boris is moving toward the west-northwest near 6 mph (9 km/hr). A gradual turn toward the west and then west-southwest is expected during the next couple of days. Estimated minimum central pressure is 996 millibars.

Douglas Also Fizzling

The National Hurricane Center noted on July 3 that Douglas is expected to weaken to a depression later today.

At 2:00 a.m. PDT the center of Tropical Storm Douglas was located near latitude 19.6 north and longitude 109.2 west or about 230 miles (375 km) south of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico and about 320 miles (520 km) west of Manzanillo, Mexico. Douglas is moving toward the north-northwest near 9 mph (15 km/hr). Meteorologists expect Douglas to turn to the west by July 5 or sooner.

On July 3, Doug's maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 km/hr) with higher gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1003 millibars.

More "Fireworks" Possible - Watching a Third Area for Development

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center are going to have a busy holiday weekend. They noted on July 3rd, "Shower and thunderstorm activity has remained limited this morning in association with a broad area of low pressure located a few hundred miles south of the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Environmental conditions appear marginally conducive for development...and there is still some potential for this system to become a tropical depression within the next couple of days as it moves slowly west-northwestward or northwestward."

This infrared image shows Tropical Storm Douglas (pictured right) off the western Mexican coast and Boris (when he was a hurricane, note the eye) to the west in open waters. It was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on July 2 at 8:35 UTC (4:35 a.m. EDT).

The AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the tops of Boris and Douglas. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


July 1, 2008

Boris Becomes the Eastern Pacific's First Hurricane

Hurricane Boris in the Pacific OceanCredit: NASA
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In the early morning hours on July 1, Tropical Storm Boris strengthened and became the Eastern Pacific's first hurricane of the 2008 season.

At 5:00 a.m. EDT, Boris' maximum sustained winds reached 75 mph, one mile per hour over the threshold of hurricane status. By 11:00 a.m. EDT, Boris maintained that intensity.

He was located near latitude 14.6 degrees north and longitude 125.0 degrees west, or about 1,140 miles (1,835 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

Boris is moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 km/hr) and a general westward motion at a gradually decreasing forward speed is expected during the next couple of days, according to the National Hurricane Center. Gradual weakening is forecast during the next couple of days, and Boris could become a tropical storm later today or tomorrow. Estimated minimum central pressure is 989 millibars.

This satellite image was captured on July 1 at 11:18 a.m. EDT from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-12), which is operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It shows how far Boris is from any land. It was created by NASA's GOES Project, located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


June 30, 2008

Eastern Pacific's Boris Chasing a Fading Cristina

AIRS image of Boris and Cristina Credit: NASA JPL
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While Cristina, the third tropical cyclone in the eastern Pacific is fading, Boris, the second tropical cyclone is still maintaining its tropical storm status.

Boris, located east of Cristina in the open waters of the eastern Pacific was located near latitude 14.8 degrees north and longitude 120.9 degrees west latitude or about 910 miles (1,465 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California at 8:00 a.m. PDT (15:00 Zulu Time) on Monday, June 30, 2008.

Boris was moving westward near 13 mph (20 km/hour) and is expected to continue in that general direction over the next 24 hours. His maximum sustained winds were near 65 mph (100 km/hr) with higher gusts, and is not expected to strengthen or weaken in the next 24 hours. Boris' minimum central pressure is estimated near 995 millibars.

This infrared image shows Tropical Storm Boris to the east of Tropical Depression Cristina. It was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite. The image was created on June 29 at 9:41 UTC (5:41 a.m. EDT).

The AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the tops of both Boris and Cristina. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the ocean waters, revealing warmer temperatures in orange and red.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


June 27, 2008

Tropical Storm Boris Born in the Eastern Pacific

TRMM image of Tropical Storm BorisCredit: NASA/TRMM
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Tropical Depression Two-E was born at 2:00 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time on Friday, June 27, 2008 in the eastern Pacific Ocean, and six hours later grew into a tropical storm named Boris.

At 8:00 a.m. PDT or 1500 Zulu Time, the center of Tropical Storm Boris was located near latitude 12.6 north and longitude 109.3 west or about 715 miles (1145 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California and about 555 miles (890 km) southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico.

Boris is moving toward the west-northwest near 9 mph (15 km/hr). A gradual turn toward the west is expected during the next 48 hours.

Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 40 mph with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is forecast during the next 24 to 36 hours. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars.

The image above was made from data captured by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite on June 27 at 12:40 UTC (8:40 a.m. EDT). This TRMM image shows the horizontal pattern of rain intensity within Boris. The center is located near the yellow, green and red areas, which indicate rainfall between 20 and 40 millimeters (.78 to 1.57 inches) per hour. The red area is considered moderate rainfall.

For more information about how TRMM looks at rainfall, visit NASA's TRMM website at: http://trmm.gsfc.nasa.gov/. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center