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Hurricane Season 2008: Typhoon Neoguri (Pacific Ocean)
04.14.08
 
April 21, 2008

The Last of Neoguri

MODIS image of Typhoon Neoguri


Typhoon Neoguri was beginning to move over the Chinese island of Hainan on April 18, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite captured this photo-like image. As the storm moved northeast throughout the day, only its outer bands passed over the island. The more powerful center stayed offshore over the warm waters of the South China Sea.

Terra MODIS captured the image at 11:30 a.m., local time (3:30 UTC) just as Neoguri was winding down from a Category 2 to a Category 1 storm. Three hours before the image was taken, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center estimated the storm’s winds to be 180 kilometers per hour (110 mph or 95 knots). When the center issued their next report three hours after the image was taken, the storm’s estimated winds speeds had dropped to 160 km/hr (100 mph or 85 knots). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center predicted that the storm would weaken into a tropical storm before striking mainland China on April 19.

Typhoon Neoguri was the first typhoon to hit China this year, and made landfall late Friday, April 18 in the northeast coastal area of Hainan. Three fishing vessels are reported to have sunk, and 40 Chinese and Vietnamese fisherman were still missing. Reports from the Hindu newspaper cited that two persons died when mud flow buried a section of road under construction in Shenzen city, and another was killed when an aluminium sheet blew off a stadium in Zhuhai city. NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Holli Riebeek.


April 18, 2008

NASA Satellite Looks at Typhoon Neoguri's Rains as it Heads to China

Satellite image of Neoguri Credit: Hal Pierce (SSAI/NASA GSFC)
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On Friday, April 18, 2008 at 12:00 Zulu Time (8:00 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Neoguri was spinning in the Pacific Ocean near 19.4 degrees north latitude and 111.3 degrees east longitude, or 115 nautical miles east of (the island of) Hainan, China.

Neoguri was packing maximum sustained winds of 80 knots (92 mph) with higher gusts, and was moving north at 8 knots (9 mph). By Sunday, April 27, Neoguri is forecast to make landfall on the mainland in southern China, east of Hong Kong and dissipate.

With its unique space-based precipitation radar, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite can peer through the clouds to see rain falling inside storms.

This image shows rainfall patterns in Typhoon Neoguri, the first typhoon of the 2008 season in the western Pacific Ocean, on April 17, 2008. The rain was most intense north of the storm’s eye, as indicated by bands of dark red. Green and blue bands show where lighter rain circle the eye. Rainfall rates in the inner swath are from TRMM’s Precipitation Radar, while the TRMM Microwave Imager captured the data in the outer swath. Rainfall rates are overlaid on visible data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner.

A few hours after the data used to make this image were acquired, Neoguri had winds estimated at 160 kilometers per hour (98 miles per hour or 85 knots) with gusts to 195 km/hr (120 mph or 105 knots). The storm was forecast to weaken as it moved over the South China Sea to eastern Hainan and mainland China. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center predicted that the storm would come ashore over southern China on April 19.

TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency, JAXA.

Text credit: Holli Riebeek and Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



April 16, 2008

Cyclone 02W Now Typhoon Neoguri in South China Sea

AIRS image of Typhoon NeoguriCredit: NASA JPL
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Typhoon Neoguri has grown from a tropical depression to a Category One Typhoon over the last two days.

Tropical depression 02W was born very early on Monday, April 14 in the Sulu Sea, some 130 miles east of Punta Baja Harbor, the Philippines. 02W was renamed Neoguri when it reached Typhoon status early on Wed., April 16, with maximum sustained winds of 65 knots (74 mph) and gusts to 80 knots (92 mph).

At 9:00 Zulu Time (5:00 a.m. EDT), Neoguri was located at 13.7 degrees north latitude and 112.1 degrees east longitude, or 270 nautical miles south-southeast of Hainan, China. Neoguri has tracked west-northwestward near 7 knots (8 mph), and is forecast to track parallel to the coast of Vietnam before making landfall in south China on Saturday, April 19th.

This infrared image of Neoguri was created on April 15 at 18:11 Zulu Time (2:11 p.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Neoguri. The infrared signal of the AIRS instrument does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). Text credit: Rob Gutro/Goddard Space Flight Center



April 14, 2008

New Tropical Depression Forms Near the Phillippines

Tropical Cyclone 02W Credit: NASA/JPL
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Tropical depression 02W was born very early on Monday, April 14 in the Sulu Sea, some 130 miles east of Punta Baja Harbor, the Philippines.

02W's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph). Its location was pinpointed near 9.4 degrees north latitude and 118.5 degrees east longitude. 02W was moving west at 13 knots (15 mph).

Cyclone 02W is forecast to track across the southwestern Philippines, before intensifying while it changes direction and moves north. The cyclone may reach typhoon strength on Thursday, and it's edges may affect southeastern Vietnam.

This visible image of Cyclone 02W was created on April 14 at 5:17 Zulu Time (1:17 a.m. EDT) by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), an instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite.

Text credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center