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Hurricane Season 2007: Wipha (Eastern Pacific)
09.19.07
 
Wipha Seen Sideways

Typhoon Wipha


NASA's CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar captured this profile of Typhoon Wipha on Sept. 19. These images show the how the storm looks horizontally and vertically. The top image shows an infrared view of the typhoon from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, with CloudSat's ground track shown as a red line. The bottom image is the vertical cross section of radar reflectivity along this path. The colors indicate the intensity of the reflected radar energy. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicates cloud ice.

Image credit: NASA/JPL

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Typhoon Wipha Strikes Eastern China

Typhoon Wipha


Typhoon Wipha made landfall in eastern China about 400 kilometers (250 miles) south of Shanghai on Wednesday, Sept. 19 local time, causing flooding and destroying thousands of homes and prompting the evacuation of some 2 million people. Wipha, a feminine name in Thai, had reached super typhoon status on Sept. 18, but weakened before reaching land, striking the coast with sustained winds of 87 knots (100 miles per hour). Wipha then moved northward and weakened to a tropical storm.

This satellite image was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite at 1:17 a.m. EDT, Sept. 18. The blue area shows clouds and rains. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the typhoon. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows large areas of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm (in purple).

Image credit: NASA/JPL

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Rob Gutro (From JTWC reports)
Goddard Space Flight Center
Images credit: NASA/JPL




Two Typhoons: Double Trouble in the East China Sea

Satellite image of storms Nari and Wipha
Click image for enlargement.

While Typhoon Wipha is whipping up waves in the western Pacific Ocean, Typhoon Nari was raining on South Korea on Sunday, Sept. 16.

In this satellite image, both typhoons are visible, Nari as the blue area in the center, and Wipha in the center bottom of the image. Wipha is on a track for a landfall south of Shanghai, China early on Sept. 19, local time. By Sept. 20, Wipha is forecast to curve toward Seoul, South Korea.

At the time of this satellite image, created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on Sunday, Sept. 16, Nari was a tropical storm with peak winds of 35 knots (40 mph), and Wipha was a Category 3 typhoon with peak winds of 105 knots (120 mph).

As of Sept. 17 at 4:47 UTC (12:47 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Wipha had strengthened into a Category 4 typhoon on the Saffir-Simpson Scale. Wipha was located near 23.4 degrees north latitude and 125.6 east longitude. It is moving west-northwest at 11 knots (12 mph) and had with maximum sustained winds near 120 knots (138 mph) with gusts to 145 knots (166 mph).

The blue areas in both storms show clouds and rains. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the typhoons. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows large areas of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm (in purple).

Rob Gutro (From JTWC reports)
Goddard Space Flight Center
Image credit: NASA/JPL