Follow this link to skip to                                      the main content

Featured Images

Text Size

Hurricane Season 2007: Juliette (Eastern Pacific)
10.03.07
 
Juliette, Wherefore Art Thou? -- Dissipating!

Satellite image of Juliette dissipating
Click image for enlargement.

During the early morning hours of Tuesday, Oct. 2, Tropical Depression Juliette was dissipating in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

The National Hurricane Center issued their last advisory on Juliette on Monday, Oct. 1 at 11:00 p.m. EDT (3:00 UTC), when she was located near 23.4 degrees north latitude and 115.8 west longitude. She was moving north-northwest at 8 knots (9 mph) and had a minimum central pressure of 1006 millibars. Her winds were down to 25 knots (30 mph) at that time.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured Juliette's fleeting moments. The first image, created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, taken Oct. 2 at 21:17 UTC or 5:17 p.m. EDT, shows only the warm temperatures of the ocean (orange). If there were high clouds indicating a storm, they would be shaded blue, or purple for the highest clouds. This image reveals that Juliette was dissipating.

Satellite image of storm Juliette
Click image for enlargement.

This image from the AIRS instrument, taken on Oct. 1 at 20:35 UTC or 4:35 p.m. EDT, shows a concentrated area of clouds and showers (in blue). AIRS images show the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in blue) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of tropical cyclones. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red).

What About the Rest of the Eastern Pacific?

The National Hurricane Center's Tropical Outlook on Wed. Oct. 3 at 7:00 a.m. EDT noted that tropical cyclone formation was not expected during the next 48 hours for the eastern north Pacific Ocean, east of 140 degrees west longitude.

Rob Gutro (From NHC reports)
Goddard Space Flight Center
Images credit: NASA/JPL




Eastern Pacific Tropical Storm Juliette Headed to Cooler Waters

Satellite image of Juliette
Click image for enlargement.

On Monday, Oct. 1, 2007, Tropical Storm Juliette was located far west of Baja California in the open waters of the eastern Pacific Ocean and headed north into cooler waters. It's forecast to become a remnant low pressure system by Oct. 3 as it tracks northwestward.

Cool waters weaken tropical storms, and forecasters expect Juliette to do just that in the next couple of days. At 1500 UTC (8:00 a.m. PDT) on Oct. 1, Juliette was located near 21.7 degrees north latitude and 115.4 degrees west longitude. It was moving northwest at 8 knots (9 mph) with a minimum central pressure of 1002 millibars. Its maximum sustained winds were near 40 knots (46 mph) with gusts to 50 knots (57 mph).

NASA's Aqua Satellite Looks at Juliette's Clouds

In this infrared image from Oct. 1 at 9:35 UTC (5:35 a.m. EDT), created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Tropical Storm Juliette. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows large areas of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm (in purple).

NASA Measures Juliette's Winds by Satellite

Satellite image of Juliette
Click image for enlargement.

The National Hurricane Center noted in its Oct. 1 discussion that forecasters used QuikScat data to determine Juliette's wind speed. The discussion noted "A late-arriving Quikscat pass caught the eastern half of the circulation and revealed several believable 35 knot wind vectors. Assuming winds are slightly higher in the convection to the north of the center...the initial intensity is set at 40 knots."

This image from NASA's QuikSCAT satellite was taken on Oct. 1, 2007 at 1:49 UTC (9:49 p.m. EDT, Sept. 30) and depicts the wind speeds in Tropical Storm Juliette. The center is indicated by the purple color. This image depicts wind speed in color and wind direction with small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. The highest wind speeds, around the eye, are shown in purple.

Rob Gutro
Goddard Space Flight Center
Images credit: NASA/JPL