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Hurricane Season 2007: Jacob (Western Pacific)
03.09.07
 
Western Australia Hit by Second Cyclone in a Week

Tropical cyclone Jacob crossed Western Australia's north coast on Mon., Mar. 12, but was considerably weaker than cyclone George that struck the week before.

Jacob made landfall as a category 1 cyclone between Whim Creek and Port Hedland, bringing heavy rains and wind gusts over 53 knots (62 mph), the Bureau of Meteorology reported. The storm began dissipating rapidly as it moved inland and forecasters warned that flooding would be the storm's main threat.

At 5:00 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on Mon., Mar. 12, tropical cyclone Jacob was located near 21.2 degrees south latitude and 120.0 degrees east longitude, or about 310 miles east-northeast of Learmonth, Australia, and was moving toward the southeast at 14 knots (16 mph). Maximum sustained winds were near 30 knots (35 mph), with gusts to 40 knots (46 mph), and will continue to dissipate, becoming fully extratropical on Tues., Mar. 13.

This photo like image of tropical cyclone Jacob was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Sat., Mar. 10 at 1:10 a.m. EST
Click image to enlarge

This photo-like image of tropical cyclone Jacob was taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Sat., Mar. 10 at 1:10 a.m. EST (0610 UTC). At the time, Jacob was a moderately-strong cyclone with an irregular shape and no obvious eyewall (ring of towering clouds) at its center. Maximum sustained winds were near 78 knots (90 mph). Image credit: MODIS Rapid Response Team/Goddard Space Flight Center. Caption credit: Mike Bettwy, RSIS/Goddard Space Flight Center.



Another Cyclone Places Australia on High Alert

Following considerable destruction and flooding over Western Australia from tropical cyclone George, forecasters are now closely watching a new cyclone - Jacob - that may strike the Australian coastline as early as Sun., Mar. 11.

At 10:00 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) on Fri., Mar. 9, tropical cyclone Jacob was located near 15.6 degrees south latitude and 109.6 degrees east longitude, or about 500 miles northeast of Learmonth, Australia, and was moving toward the southeast at 10 knots (12 mph). Maximum sustained winds were near 65 knots (75 mph), with gusts to 80 knots (92 mph). Wave heights near the storm center were 22 feet.

Recent satellite imagery shows that deep cloud cover and intense thunderstorms have wrapped into the storm's low level circulation, a sign of intensification. An area of high pressure over Indonesia continues to steer Jacob. As this high shifts southward over the Timor Sea by Sat., Mar. 10, forecasters expect Jacob's forward movement to increase. The cyclone will likely intensify further as its overall structure becomes more organized and symmetric.

TRMM image of Tropical Cyclone Jacob on March 9, 2007.
Click image to enlarge

This image of tropical cyclone Jacob was taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite at 3:47 a.m. EST (0847 UTC) on Fri., Mar. 9. It shows a top-down-view of rain intensity. Estimated rain rates of 20 to 35 millimeters (0.79 inches to 1.38 inches) per hour were common near the storm center. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA. Caption credit: Mike Bettwy, RSIS/Goddard Space Flight Center

 
 
Mike Bettwy
Goddard Space Flight Center