Featured Images

Text Size

Hurricane Season 2007: Tropical Cyclone Celia (Indian)
12.14.07
 


Dec. 19, 2007

Tropical Cyclone Celia (06S) Fading in Southern Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone Celia, also known as Cyclone 06S was quickly fading in the southern Indian Ocean, just one day after it received a name. On Dec. 18 at 3:00 Zulu Time (Dec. 17 at 10:00 p.m. EST), Celia's sustained winds decreased to near 30 knots (34 mph), as she had entered into an area of wind shear and cooler waters. Wind shear means winds blowing different ways at various levels of the atmosphere, which tear tropical cyclones apart. Cyclones also need waters over 80 degrees Fahrenheit to survive and Celia is moving into cooler waters.

Celia was fading near 20.5 degrees south latitude and 59.7 degrees east longitude, or about 250 nautical miles east of La Reunion. She was moving west-southwest near 7 knots (8 mph). She is expected to dissipate during the day on Dec. 18.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center



Dec. 17, 2007

Tropical Cyclone Celia Spinning in the Indian Ocean

Satellite image of Celia Click image for enlargement. Credit: NASA/JPL The Indian Ocean has spawned another tropical cyclone. At 1500 UTC (10:00 a.m. EST), Tropical Cyclone 06S, also known as Celia, had maximum sustained winds of 35 knots (40 mph) with gusts to 45 knots (51 mph).

Celia was moving south-southwest near 13 knots (15 mph). Celia appears to be on a forecast track south of La Reunion Island, and will likely bring the island, rains, winds and waves.

RĂ©union island is located in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar, about 130 miles (200 km south west of Mauritius, the nearest island.

The adverse atmospheric conditions, coupled with decreasing ocean temperatures, will weaken the cyclone to below the warning threshold of 35 knots within 24 hours so Celia will likely become a tropical depression or a remnant low pressure area within that time. The remnant circulation will pass close to Mauritius on December 19.

This infrared image from Dec. 17 at 9:53 UTC (4:53 a.m. EST) was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite.

Celia's clouds and rains are the blue and purple areas. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red).

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; Ed Olson, JPL



Dec. 14, 2007

Tropical Depression 06S Stirs in the Open Southern Indian Ocean

Satellite image of tropical depression 06S Click image for enlargement. Credit: NASA/JPL The sixth tropical depression in the southern Indian Ocean is now alive and kicking in open waters, far away from any land.

Tropical Depression 06S ("S" for south) was located near 14.2 degrees south latitude and 69.3 degrees east longitude in open waters. It had maximum sustained winds of 30 knots (34 mph) 40 knots (46 mph).

Tropical Depression 06S (TD 06S) was located approximately 460 nautical miles south-southwest of Diego Garcia. Diego Garcia is an atoll located in the heart of the Indian Ocean, some 1,000 miles south off India's and Sri Lanka's southern coast.

TD 06S has been tracking southward at 3 knots (3 mph) and has moved very little recently.

This infrared image of TD 06S was created by data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on Dec. 13 at 8:41 UTC (3:41 a.m. EST). TD06S is the dark blue area on the lower left side of the image.

This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of TD 06S. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). This infrared image shows large areas of strong convection surrounding the core of the storm (in purple) surrounded by blue areas.

Text Credit: Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center