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Hurricane Season 2006: Cimaron (Western Pacific)
10.31.06
 
Typhoon Cimaron in Open Waters of South China Sea

TRMM image of Super Typhoon Cimaron on November 1, 2006.Click image to enlarge

The image above was made from data captured by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite on Nov. 1, 2006, at 7:42 a.m. EST (1242 UTC) as Typhoon Cimaron continues to spin in the South China Sea.

The image shows a top-down view of the rain intensity obtained from TRMM's sensors. Estimated rain rates range from 1 millimeter (blue) to 40 millimeters (red) or 0.3 to 1.57 inches per hour. The graph on the right hand side of the image (click on image to see the graph) shows the height from which rains were falling. Typically, the higher the clouds, the heavier the rainfall. The highest clouds and rain in Cimaron seen by the TRMM satellite on Nov. 1 reach up to 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) high. According to the satellite data, the storm also appears to be 250 kilometers (155 miles) from end to end. That distance is slightly more than the distance between Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia.

On Nov. 2 at 12:00 UTC 7:00 a.m. EST (12:00 UTC), Cimaron's maximum sustained winds were down to 75 knots (86 mph) with gusts to 90 knots (103 mph), making it currently a category one typhoon. Cimaron's center at the time was located near 18.7 north latitude and 116.5 east longitude, approximately 250 nautical miles south-southeast of Hong Kong. It was moving to the south-southwest at 2 knots (2 mph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center reports that rainfall has diminished significantly over the last 24 hours, a sign of weakening. Cimaron's winds are expected to weaken down to 55 knots (63 mph) in the next day into tropical storm status. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

+ Joint Typhoon Warning Center



Super Typhoon Cimaron Headed to Vietnam

Aqua satellite captured this image of Super Typhoon Cimarron on October 31, 2006.
Click on image to enlarge

Super Typhoon Cimaron struck the northernmost large island in the Philippines, Luzon, on October 29, 2006. According to BBC News Service, the typhoon was the most powerful to strike the island chain since 1998, lashing Luzon with 200-kilometer-an-hour (125-mile-per-hour) winds and torrential rain. After passing through the island chain, Cimaron weakened significantly, falling below Category 3 strength (the threshold separating a typhoon from a super typhoon). The typhoon then picked up power over the South China Sea as it headed towards Vietnam. On November 1, Reuters reported a projected landfall in Vietnam on November 3, with an expected strength of Category 1, though predictions of storm strength are challenging to make accurately. Residents of Vietnam are preparing for possible evacuations, as are residents of the Chinese coastal areas including the island of Hainan and Hong Kong.

The photo-like image above was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite on October 31, 2006, at 1:35 p.m. local time (5:35 UTC). At this time, Typhoon Cimaron was in the center of the South China Sea. Winds were around 160 kilometers per hour (100 miles per hour), according to the University of Hawaii’s Tropical Storm Information Center.

The high-resolution image provided above is at MODIS full spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides this image at additional resolutions. Credits: Image--NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team Caption--NASA's Earth Observatory



Super Typhoon Cimaron to Hit the Phillippines

TRMM image of supertyphoon Cimaron on October 29, 2006.
Click image to enlarge

Super Typhoon Cimaron is the second deadly typhoon to affect the Philippines this year. Cimaron's sustained wind speed reached over 140 knots (161 mph) making it a category five super typhoon before it comes ashore in the Philippines.

On Mon. Oct. 30, the Manila government was preparing for arrival of Typhoon "Paeng," international code name: Cimaron. The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) issues typhoon forecasts. PAGASA forecast the typhoon to make landfall on the eastern province then move across Northern Luzon, with strong winds and heavy rains. By Oct. 31, Cimaron is expected to move out into the South China Sea.

The image above was made from data captured by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite on Oct. 29, 2006 at (12:40 a.m. EST) 0540 UTC as Cimaron was approaching the Philippines.

The image shows a top-down-view of the rain intensity obtained from TRMM's sensors. Estimated rain rates range from 1 millimeter to 40 millimeters (.3 to 1.57 inches) per hour. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese space agency JAXA.

On Mon. Oct. 30, at 12:00 UTC (7:00 a.m. EST) Cimaron was located near 16.9 North Latitude and 118.2 East Longitude. At that time maximum sustained winds were at 90 knots (103 mph) with gusts to 110 knots (126 mph). Credits: Image--TRMM Project, NASA; Caption--Rob Gutro, Goddard Space Flight Center