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Hurricane Season 2006: Bud (Eastern Pacific)
07.11.06
 
Hurricanes Chasing Each Other in the Eastern Pacific

Still Image from a time lapse of GOES images showing the two hurricanes chasing after one another.
Click on image to view animation.

Hurricane season in the eastern Pacific in mid-July is currently making forecasters see double. On Friday, July 14, there were two hurricanes in the eastern Pacific, Bud and Carlotta, and both are tracking into the open Pacific.

This animation of the storms was created from satellite images from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). The movie shows Hurricane Bud in front (left) of Hurricane Carlotta (right) until just after 3:00 p.m. EDT on Friday, July 14. The movie was created by NASA's GOES Project Science Office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Where Exactly is Hurricane Bud on July 14 and What's in Store? At 5:00 a.m. EDT (9:00 GMT) on Friday, July 14, Hurricane Bud was located near 19.5 degrees North latitude, and 125.9 West longitude, moving toward the west-northwest at 15 mph (13 knots). Minimum central pressure is 983 millibars. Bud was packing sustained winds of 70 knots (80 mph) with gusts to 85 knots (98 mph).

What's in store for the weekend? According to the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) forecast discussion, cooler sea surface temperatures and an increasingly stable environment continue to induce a steady weakening of Bud. The NHC believes that Bud will become a tropical depression on Saturday, July 15, and dissipate later.

Where Exactly is Hurricane Carlotta, and What's Her Future? At 11:00 a.m. EDT (15:00 GMT) on Friday, July 14, 2006, the National Hurricane Center placed Hurricane Carlotta near 18.4 North latitude and 113.7 West longitude. She was moving west-northwest at 9 mph (8 knots) with an estimated minimum central pressure of 987 millibars. Carlotta had maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (65 knots) with gusts to 92 mph (80 knots), just enough to be considered a category one hurricane.

The NHC reports that the northern half of Carlotta's circulation is over cool waters and the strongest convection (rapidly rising air that forms thunderstorms) is limited to the eastern portion of the storm. The NHC said that Carlotta is expected to be over cooler waters in about 12 to 24 hours (by 11 a.m. EDT on Sat. July 15) so weakening is expected by then and it could happen faster. Carlotta will lose its hurricane status once that happens. Credit: NASA GOES Project. Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA GSFC.

MISR image of Hurricane Bud

These July 11, 2006 images are from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument aboard NASA's Terra Satellite. They show then Tropical Storm Bud as it was intensifying into a hurricane, which it became later that day. The true-color image at left is next to an image of cloud heights on the right. Two-dimensional maps of cloud heights such as these give scientists an opportunity to compare their models against actual hurricane observations.

At the time of these images, Bud was located near 14.4 degrees north latitude and 112.5 degrees west longitude, or about 620 miles (1000 kilometers) southwest of Cabo San Lucas, Baja California, Mexico.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena,Calif. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team. (+ Click to view a larger version of this image.).


CloudSat Peers Sideways at Hurricane Bud

CloudSat Image of Hurricane Bud

These two satellite images tell different stories of Hurricane Bud, which is plowing through the eastern Pacific Ocean.

The top satellite image was taken from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) on July 12 at 9:30 a.m. GMT (5:30 a.m. EDT). The line from A to B represents the orbit track of CloudSat across the hurricane on July 12. CloudSat flew very close to the center of Hurricane Bud. CloudSat "sees inside" the clouds directly under the orbit track (the A to B line).

The image on the bottom is from the CloudSat satellite and shows what Hurricane Bud looks like from a side view.

The red and purple areas indicate large amounts of cloud water or precipitation. Slightly to the left of center of the bottom panel, there is an indication of intense precipitation. Notice that the solid line along the bottom of the panel, which is the ground, disappears in this area of intense precipitation. It is likely that in the area the precipitation rate exceeds 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour) based on previous studies. The scale from left to right is approximately 1300 km (807 miles), and the vertical scale from top to bottom is approximately 30km (18 miles). The clouds in this hurricane reach heights exceeding 20km (12 miles).

Where is Hurricane Bud on July 14? At 5:00 a.m. EDT (9:00 GMT) on Friday, July 14, Hurricane Bud was located near 19.5 degrees North latitude, and 125.9 West longitude, moving toward the west-northwest at 15 mph (13 knots). Minimum central pressure is 983 millibars. Bud was packing sustained winds of 70 knots (80 mph) with gusts to 85 knots (98 mph).

What's in store for the weekend? According to the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) forecast discussion, cooler sea surface temperatures and an increasingly stable environment continue to induce a steady weakening of Bud. The NHC believes that Bud will become a tropical depression on Saturday, July 15th, and dissipate later.

Credit: NASA/JPL. Caption: Deb Vane, NASA JPL & Rob Gutro, NASA GSFC. (+ Click to view larger version of this image.)


Two Tropical Cyclones Spin in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

Hurricane Bud and Tropical Storm Carlotta as seen by the GOES satellite.

This satellite image of the eastern Pacific Ocean shows two active tropical cyclones in that part of the world on Wed. July 12, 2006. Hurricane Bud is swirling southwest of Mexico's Baja Peninsula with the larger Tropical Storm Carlotta just behind. Both are headed west in to the open waters of the Pacific Ocean.

This image of the Earth was taken by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This data was processed by NASA's GOES Project Science Office at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Where is Hurricane Bud? At 11:00 a.m. EDT (15:00 GMT) on Wed. July 12, 2006 Bud's center was located near latitude 15.7 degrees north and longitude 116.2 degrees west. Movement was toward the west-northwest at 11 knots (12.6 mph), with an estimated minimum central pressure of 972 millibars. Maximum sustained winds were near 85 knots (98 mph) with gusts to 105 knots (120 mph). A continued west-northwestward motion is forecast with some slowing of forward speed.

Where is Tropical Storm Carlotta? At 11:00 a.m. EDT on Wed. July 12, the National Hurricane Center, noted that Tropical Storm Carlotta was moving away from the coast of Mexico, as is indicated in the GOES satellite image. At 8:00 a.m. PDT (11:00 a.m. EDT) the center of Tropical Storm Carlotta was located near latitude 14.5 north and longitude 105.3 west or about 320 miles south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Carlotta was moving toward the west-northwest near 13 mph and this motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 24 hours. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1002 millibars. Rains along the coast of southwestern Mexico are diminishing as Carlotta moves farther offshore.

Credit: NASA GSFC/NOAA. Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA GSFC. (+ Click to view a larger view of this image.)

Hurricane Bud Treks Through the Eastern Pacific

AIRS images of Hurricane Bud in the Pacific Ocean

Top Image: This is an infrared image of Hurricane Bud in the eastern Pacific, from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite on July 10, 2006. This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the hurricane. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red).

Bottom Image: The second image is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the instrument. It shows where the heaviest rainfall is taking place (in blue) in the storm. Blue areas outside of Hurricane Bud where there are either some clouds or no clouds indicate where the sea surface shines through.

Where is Hurricane Bud? On Wed. July 12, at 5:00 a.m. EDT (9:00 a.m. GMT), the National Hurricane Center's latest advisory on Hurricane Bud placed the center near 15.0 North, and 115.3 West, in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The maximum sustained winds were around 85 knots (98 mph) with gusts to 105 knots (120 mph). The movement was toward the west-northwest at 11 knots (12 mph), and the minimum central pressure is estimated around 972 millibars. Credit: NASA/JPL. Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA GSFC & Sharon Ray, NASA JPL. (+ Click to view a larger version of the top image. | + Click to view a larger version of the bottom image.)

Quickscat Image of Tropical Storm Bud in the Pacific Ocean

Tropical Storm Bud is the season's second eastern Pacific storm, on July 11th was located far off shore southwest of Mexico's Baja Peninsula. At 2 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, Bud was located near 14.4 North and 113.0 West.

Bud is moving toward the west-northwest at 9 knots (10 mph). Estimated minimum central pressure is 996 millibars, and the maximum sustained winds were 50 knots (57 mph) with gusts to 60 knots (69 mph).

This image, from NASA's QuikSCAT satellite was captured at approximately 1:05 a.m. UTC (18:05 PDT) which is a little after 6 p.m. PDT on Monday, July 10th. The image depicts wind speed in color and wind direction with small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. The highest wind speeds, shown in purple, surround the center of the storm.

The QuikSCAT scatterometer sends pulses of microwave energy through the atmosphere to the ocean surface, and measures the energy that bounces back from the wind-roughened surface. The energy of the microwave pulses changes depending on wind speed and direction, giving scientists a way to monitor wind around the world. Credit: NASA/JPL. (+ Click to view a larger version of this image.)
 
 
Rob Gutro
Goddard Space Flight Center