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Hurricane Season 2006: Prapiroon (Pacific)
08.04.06
 
This image is from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 2, 2006 at 1:59 p.m. EDT. The second image is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the AIRS instrument.

Image above left: Where are the Highest Clouds in Prapiroon?

This is an infrared image of Typhoon Prapiroon in South China Sea as it is approaching mainland China. This image is from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite on Aug. 2, 2006 at 1:59 p.m. EDT (17:59 UTC). This AIRS image shows the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of Prapiroon. The infrared signal does not penetrate through clouds. Where there are no clouds the AIRS instrument reads the infrared signal from the surface of the Earth, revealing warmer temperatures (red). Click image to enlarge.

Image above right: Where is Prapiroon's Heaviest Rainfall?

The second image is created from microwave radiation emitted by Earth's atmosphere and received by the instrument. It shows where the heaviest rainfall is taking place (in blue, surrounded by yellow) in the storm. Blue areas outside of Typhoon Prapiroon are where there are either some clouds or no clouds indicate where the sea surface shines through. One of the areas of heaviest rainfall is seen just south of the Hainan province in the center of the image. Click image to enlarge.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL. Caption Credit: NASA/JPL



MODIS Captures Typhoon Prapiroon

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on NASA's Terra satellite acquired this photo like image of Typhoon Prapiroon on August 3, 2006, at 11:30 a.m. local time. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite acquired this photo-like image of Typhoon Prapiroon on August 3, 2006, at 11:30 a.m. local time (03:30 UTC). Click image to enlarge. Prapiroon had a very well defined spiral shape and active thunderstorm systems close to the eyewall. At the time of this image, the storm had a closed eye: the center of the storm still had significant cloud cover. Open eye structures are common in the most powerful of storms, and given that Prapiroon had a partially open eye the previous day, Typhoon Prapiroon would seem to be losing strength. The measured wind speeds, however, bely that assessment as the storm system’s peak sustained winds were estimated to be around 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles per hour) around the time the image was captured, according to the University of Hawaii’s Tropical Storm Information Center, similar to the day before. Typhoon Prapiroon formed in the eastern Pacific on July 31, 2006, off the coast of Luzon, the northernmost of the Philippine Islands. The tropical depression strengthened to storm status in the next day after crossing Luzon, and reached typhoon status by early August 2 as it continued east-northeast across the South China Sea towards the Asian mainland. The storm system was blamed for some six deaths in the Philippines as it crossed the island. As of August 3, it was predicted to make landfall in southern China not far from Hainan Island packing forecasted winds around 115 kilometers per hour (73 miles per hour). Fishing boats were ordered into port and rescue teams were being prepared for possible flooding and landslides. + High resolution image Credit: NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center.



CloudSat Captures Typhoon Prapiroon in the South China Sea

Typhoon Prapiroon brought strong winds and heavy rains when it slammed into south China's Guangdong Province on Thursday evening, Aug. 3.

Prapiroon weakened into a tropical storm over southern China on Aug. 4 after forcing the evacuation of more than 400,000 people and cutting transport links across the region. The storm, which hit the coastal province of Guangdong, was moving northwest with heavy winds and rain, the Central Meteorological Office reported. Strong winds caused 184 flight delays and cancellations at Hong Kong's airport. Prapiroon, which means "Rain God" in Thai, had killed six people in the Philippines. China's Ministry of Civil Affairs reported 18 deaths occurred in the southern provinces of Guangdong and Hainan and the neighboring region of Guangxi. Those provinces are on the southeast side of the country.

At approximately 0553 UTC (1:53 am EDT), on 2 Aug 2006, NASA's CloudSat satellite flew over the eye of Typhoon Prapiroon as it approached southern China.

The upper image is from the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, to give an idea of how the storm looked from the top. The upper part of the image is from the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on NASA's Aqua satellite, to give an idea of how the storm looked from the top. The bottom part of the image is from NASA's new CloudSat satellite. The CloudSat radar flies behind the Aqua satellite, as part of a larger group of satellites. Click on image to enlarge.

The red and purple areas indicate large amounts of cloud water. The blue areas along the top of the clouds indicates cloud ice, while the wavy blue lines on the bottom of the image indicate intense rainfall. The solid line along the bottom of the panel, which is the ground or ocean surface, disappears in many of these areas of intense precipitation. It is likely that in these areas the precipitation rate exceeds 30mm/hr (1.18 inches/hour) based on previous studies.

The CloudSat radar data will be processed to estimate the total amount of water and ice contained in this typhoon.

MODIS Image/Caption credit: NASA
CloudSat Image credit: CIRA

 
 
Rob Gutro
Goddard Space Flight Center