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Hurricane Season 2005: Typhoon Matsa
08.04.05
 
Image of Typhoon Matsa taken by the MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite on August 5, 2005.

Image above: Typhoon Matsa is shown here on the morning of August 5, 2005. This image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite at 05:15 UTC (3:15 p.m. local time). The typhoon is a well organized mature storm by this point with steady winds of around 150 kilometers per hour (90 miles per hour). The high-resolution image provided above is 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response System provides images of Typhoon Matsa at additional resolutions.
+ Click for high resolution image. Credit: NASA


Earlier Images

Image of Typhoon Matsa taken by the MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite on August 4, 2005.

Image above: Typhoon Matsa is shown here on the morning of August 4, 2005. This image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite at 04:30 UTC (2:30 p.m. local time). The typhoon is a well organized mature storm by this point with steady winds of around 150 kilometers per hour (90 miles per hour). It is now predicted to head into northern China making landfall around Wenzhou, bringing substantial rain to areas only just recently drenched by super typhoon Haitang. + Click here for high resolution image. Credit: NASA

Image of Typhoon Matsa

Image Above: Typhoon Matsa is shown here as observed by NASA's QuikSCAT satellite on August 2, 2005, at 08:46 UTC (16:46 in Manilla). At this time, the typhoon's sustained winds reached 120 kilometers per hour (75 miles per hour or 65 knots), sufficient to upgrade it from a storm to a typhoon. The Philippines are located to the west of the storm, not far off the typhoon's path at the time.

The image depicts wind speed in color and wind direction with small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. The highest wind speeds, shown in purple, surround the center of the storm.

Measurements of the wind strength of Typhoon Matsa show sustained winds slightly higher than those shown by QuikSCAT observations. This is because the power of the storm makes accurate measurements difficult. The scatterometer sends pulses of microwave energy through the atmosphere to the ocean surface, and measures the energy that bounces back from the wind-roughened surface. The energy of the microwave pulses changes depending on wind speed and direction, giving scientists a way to monitor wind around the world.

Credit: NASA JPL/QuikSCAT