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Hurricane Season 2005: Emily
07.13.05
 
Updated 7/22/05 -- 10:30 a.m. EDT -- Hurricane Emily

Hurricane Emily seen on July 20, 2005 by the Aqua satellite.


Image above: Hurricane Emily had come ashore in Mexico on July 20, 2005, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image. The image shows the storm at 3:05 p.m. local time, roughly one day after Emily made landfall. The storm is bringing much needed rain into the parched Rio Grande drainage basin, though the arrival of this water as a deluge poses dangers and challenges even as it refills low water reservoirs slightly.

Emily is a record-setting storm for many reasons. When it formed on July 11, Emily became the earliest fifth named storm on record. As it moved through the Caribbean, Emily intensified into a powerful Category 4 storm with winds over 250 km/hr (150 mph) and gusts as high as 300 km/hr (184 mph), making it the most powerful storm to form before August. The previous record was set by Hurricane Dennis, which ripped through the Caribbean during the first week of July 2005. Emily’s Category 4 status also made 2005 the only year to produce two Category 4 storms before the end of July.

Emily is responsible for five deaths through the Carribean, as well as considerable damage in places as far apart as the Lesser Antilles Islands and Jamaica to Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. Tornadoes spawned by Emily have also caused some damage in southern Texas. + High resolution image Credit: NASA



Earlier Images of Emily


Image of Hurricane Emily captured by TRMM on July 19, 2005.


Image above: The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured this remarkable image of a rejuvenated Hurricane Emily in the western Gulf of Mexico. The image was taken at 17:36 UTC (1:36 pm EDT) on 19 July 2005 as Emily was bearing down on the northern coast of Mexico. The image shows a top-down perspective of the rain intensity within Emily as obtained from TRMM's sensors. Rain rates in the center of the swath are from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), a radar that can measure precipitation from space. Rain rates in the outer swath are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). The eye of Emily is clearly visible in the center of the storm as a red semicircle indicating heavy rain intensities. At the time of this image, Emily was classified as a strong Category 1 hurricane with maximum sustained winds reported at 95 mph by the National Hurricane Center. The storm was moving west-northwest at 14 mph and was located 210 miles southeast of Brownsville, Texas. Credit: NASA

Hurricane Emily as seen by Aqua on July 19, 2005.


Image above: Despite its encounter with land, Hurricane Emily retained the characteristic swirling form of a hurricane when it emerged over the Gulf of Mexico on July 19, 2005. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image at 14:20 p.m. local time in Cancun, Mexico, roughly one day after Emily returned to open waters. At this time, the storm was a Category 1 storm with winds of 150 kilometers per hour (85 knots), slightly stronger than when it first moved off the Yucatan Peninsula the day before. It left a wide swath of damage behind it, but with no reported casualities attributed to the storm.

Emily is a record-setting storm for many reasons. When it formed on July 11, Emily became the earliest fifth named storm on record. As it moved through the Caribbean, Emily intensified into a powerful Category 4 storm with winds over 250 km/hr (150 mph) and gusts as high as 300 km/hr (184 mph), making it the most powerful storm to form before August. The previous record was set by Hurricane Dennis, which ripped through the Caribbean during the first week of July 2005. Emily’s Category 4 status also made 2005 the only year to produce two Category 4 storms before the end of July. Credit: NASA


ER-2 Doppler Radar Views Detailed Super-Anatomy


Image above: A vertical slice through the center of Hurricane Emily shows the rain structure across the entire storm. Note the lack of precipitation inside the eye of the storm compared to the intense thunderstorm just outside of it, in the eyewall. The areas of heaviest rainfall are shown in red and the lightest are in blue. The rainfall structure was measured by NASA's ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP) as part of the 2005 Tropical Cloud Systems and Processes (TCSP) Mission currently taking place in Costa Rica. When the EDOP flew over the storm to get this data, early morning on July 17th, Hurricane Emily was nearly 210 miles across and 60,000 feet high. Credit: NASA

Image of Hurricane Emily as seen by MODIS on the Terra satellite on July 18, 2005.


Image above: This image was captured by MODIS on the Terra satellite on July 18, 2005. In this image, Emily's trailing edge is over the Yucatan Peninsula, the eye is over the Gulf of Mexico and the storm itself is headed for the U.S. + High resolution image. Credit: NASA

Hurricane Emily captured by MODIS on the Terra satellite on July 17, 2005.


Image above: This image was captured by MODIS on the Terra satellite on July 16, 2005. Currently the National Hurricane Center is predicting the following movement for Emily: Emily is currently over the Yucatan Peninsula and is expected to move over the Gulf of Mexico later today. A hurricane watch remains in effect from Cabo Rojo, Mexico northward to Baffin Bay, Texas. A hurricane warning remains in effect for the Yucatan Peninsula from Chetuman nortward to Cabo Catouche, Mexico, westward and southward to Campeche including Cozumel and the Islas Mujeres. + High resolution image. Credit: NASA

MODIS image of Hurricane Emily from July 16, 2005.


Image above: This image was captured by MODIS on the Terra satellite on July 16, 2005. Currently the National Hurricane Center is predicting the following movement for Emily: Emily is now a Category Four hurricane and is currenlty moving away from the Cayman Islands. There is a new hurricane warning for Mexico. Hurricane conditions are expected to hit Mexico within the next 24 hours. A tropical storm warning is in effect for the coast of Belize. Tropical storm condiions are also possible for portions of extreme western Cuba. + For a high resolution image. Credit: NASA

TRMM image of Hurricane Emily taken on July 15, 2005.


Image above:This image of Hurricane Emily was taken by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite at 16:23 UTC (12:23 pm EDT) on 15 July 2005 as Emily was passing through the central Caribbean south of the island of Hispaniola. The image shows a top-down-view of the rain intensity obtained from TRMM's sensors. Rain rates in the center portion of the swath are from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), a radar that is designed to measure precipitation from space. Rain rates in the outer swath are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). The center of Emily, which is visible as a green semicircle indicating moderate rain intensity, falls within the TMI swath in this image and not the PR swath. At the time of this image, Emily was classified as a Category 3 hurricane with maximum sustained winds measured at 125 mph by the Natioinal Hurricane Center. The storm was moving west-northwest at 20 mph. + Slightly larger image Credit: NASA

Quikscat image of Emily from July 15, 2005.


Image above: NASA's Quikscat scatterometer instrument captured the winds of Hurricane Emily on July 15th 5:49 am EDT Emily was located off the northern coast of South America. The image depicts wind speed in color and wind direction with small barbs. White barbs point to areas of heavy rain. The highest wind speeds, shown in purple, surround the center of the storm. The National Hurricane Center reported that Emily's winds at the time were 115 knots with gusts to 140 knots. The minimum central pressure was 952 millibars, and the diameter of Emily's eye was 10 nautical miles. Credit: NASA JPL

Hurricane Emily as seen by MODIS on July 14, 2005.

Image above: Hurricane Emily is shown here in the Carribbean north of Venezuela on July 14, 2005. The image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite at 17:20 UTC (13:20 Eastern Daylight Time). At this time, it was a well developed and powerful hurricane with winds over 150 kilometers an hour (85 knots). It passed through the chain of islands known as the Windward Islands, causing one death in the city of St. George’s on Grenada. It is building up towards a Category 4 hurricane, the second strongest storm on the Saffir-Simpson intensity scale. Projections take it glancing off Jamaica, striking the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, and continuing across into the Gulf of Mexico to make landfall again somewhere near Brownsville, Texas on the border with Mexico and the United States. + Click for high resolution image.Credit: NASA

Hurricane Emily captured by QuikScat on July 13, 2005. Hurricane Emily captured by Quikscat on July 13 2005.


Image above: When NASA’s Quick Scatterometer (QuickScat) captured the left-hand image on July 13, 2005, Emily was just a few hours away from becoming a hurricane. The tropical storm was approaching Trinidad with winds of 95 kilometers per hour (60 miles per hour or 50 knots) when this image was taken at 5:05 p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time (21:05 UTC). The image reveals the structure of the storm, with wind speed shown in color and direction indicated by barbs. The white barbs indicate regions of heavy rain. Both the heaviest downpours and the strongest winds, shown in purple, are just east of the center of the storm. Compared to an image taken in the morning of July 13 (right), this powerful section of the storm has expanded and moved closer to the center as Emily developed through the day. Emily is the fifth tropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, and the second storm to reach hurricane status. By July 15, Emily reached Category 3 status on the Saffir-Simpson scale with winds of 205 km/hr (125 mph). + Click for high resolution of left image. + Click for high resolution of right image. Credit: NASA/JPL

Tropical Storm Emily on the Horizon

TRMM satellite image of Tropical Storm Emily.


Image Above: The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Emily at 16:44 UTC (12:44 pm EDT) on 13 July 2005 as it was approaching the Windward Islands. The image shows a top-down-view of the rain intensity obtained from TRMM's sensors. Rain rates in the center of the swath are from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), the only radar that can measure precipitation from space. Rain rates in the outer swath are from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). The rain rates are overlaid on infrared (IR) data from the TRMM Visible Infrared Scanner (VIRS). At the time of this image, Emily was a tropical storm with sustained winds estimated at 60 mph by the National Hurricane Center and was moving westward at near 20 mph. + Higher resolution image Credit: NASA