Photo Gallery

Text Size

Parachute Tests
Parachute testing + Browse Resolution
+ Full Resolution




NASA and its industry partners recently completed a series of tests that will aid in the design and development of the parachute recovery system for Orion, the vehicle that will carry a new generation back to the moon and later to Mars. The 156-foot-diameter test parachute, seen here fully deployed, was slightly larger than each of the three chutes that will support Orion's landing. Each of those chutes is expected to be about 120 feet in diameter, but the final size will be determined as a result of the test program. Photo credit: NASA


Parachute testing + Browse Resolution
+ Full Resolution




NASA recently completed a series of tests that will aid in the design and development of the parachute recovery system its newest spacecraft, Orion. The parachute tests demonstrated a three-stage deployment sequence that included the use of an Orbiter drag chute, seen in this photo, to properly stage the unfurling of the main chute. The parachute recovery system for Orion will be similar to the system used for Apollo command module landings and include two drogue, three pilot and three main parachutes. Photo credit: NASA


Orion parachute sequence +Browse Resolution
+ Full Resolution




A graphic depicts the Orion Parachute Sequence. Credit: NASA


Parachute testing + Browse Resolution
+ Full Resolution




A pilot parachute and its payload, a 1,500-pound drop test vehicle, descend from an elevation of about 10,000 feet during a series of tests for the development of the booster recovery system for NASA’s Ares I crew launch vehicle. Photo credit: NASA


Parachute testing + Browse Resolution
+ Full Resolution




A CH-47 Chinook helicopter lifts a parachute drop test vehicle to an elevation of 10,000 feet above a Yuma, Ariz., test range as part of a series of tests that will aid in development of the booster recovery system for NASA's Ares I crew launch vehicle. Photo credit: NASA