Feature

Pad Abort 1 Flight Sequence
04.06.10
 
Artist's rendering of the Orion launch abort vehicle
JSC2010-E-009860 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle poised for liftoff in the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system being tested will be capable of pulling the crew module away from the crew launch vehicle within milliseconds in the event of an emergency on the pad or during the initial ascent phase. It is a key element in NASA's continuing efforts to improve safety as the agency develops the next generation of spacecraft.

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JSC2010-E-009861  -- Artist's rendering of the Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009861 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle immediately after liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The abort motor ignites to generate nearly 500,000 pounds of thrust in a fraction of a second to lift the vehicle off the pad. It pushes the vehicle from 0 to 600 miles per hour in two seconds and burns out in just over six seconds. The attitude control motor's eight proportional valves equally spaced around the circumference of the motor can exert up to 7,000 pounds of steering force each to guide the vehicle in any direction upon command.



JSC2010-E-009863 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009863 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle climbing skyward following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The Orion Abort Flight Test Launch Complex is visible below. The launch abort system being tested will be capable of pulling the crew module away from the crew launch vehicle within milliseconds in the event of an emergency on the pad or during the initial ascent phase. It is a key element in NASA's continuing efforts to improve safety as the agency develops the next generation of spacecraft.



JSC2010-E-009864 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009864 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The attitude control motor's eight proportional valves equally spaced around the circumference of the motor can exert up to 7,000 pounds of steering force each to guide the vehicle in any direction upon command. The motor begins a five-second reorientation sequence about 10 seconds into the flight to position the crew module for parachute deployment and landing.



JSC2010-E-009865 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009865 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The attitude control motor's eight proportional valves equally spaced around the circumference of the motor can exert up to 7,000 pounds of steering force each to guide the vehicle in any direction upon command. The motor begins a five-second reorientation sequence about 10 seconds into the flight to position the crew module for parachute deployment and landing.



JSC2010-E-009866 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009866 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The attitude control motor's eight proportional valves equally spaced around the circumference of the motor can exert up to 7,000 pounds of steering force each to guide the vehicle in any direction upon command. The motor begins a five-second reorientation sequence about 10 seconds into the flight to position the crew module for parachute deployment and landing.



JSC2010-E-009867 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009867 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The attitude control motor's eight proportional valves equally spaced around the circumference of the motor can exert up to 7,000 pounds of steering force each to guide the vehicle in any direction upon command. The motor begins a five-second reorientation sequence about 10 seconds into the flight to position the crew module for parachute deployment and landing.



JSC2010-E-046312 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-046312 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The jettison motor fires about 21 seconds into the flight with 50,000 pounds of thrust to separate the entire launch abort system from the crew module. The attitude control motor is expected to continue to burn for a few seconds after jettison. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration



JSC2010-E-009868 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009868 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The jettison motor fires about 21 seconds into the flight with 50,000 pounds of thrust to separate the entire launch abort system from the crew module and one second later two parachutes deploy to remove the forward bay cover from the crew module.



JSC2010-E-009869 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009869 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module 21 seconds into the flight. Two parachutes deploy to remove the forward bay cover (shown) from the crew module before landing parachutes can be deployed.



JSC2010-E-009870 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009870 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module descending back to Earth following the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module. Nearly 25 seconds into the flight two drogue parachutes deploy (shown) to stabilize the crew module before three pilot parachutes deploy. Thirty-one seconds into the flight three main parachutes deploy for landing after nearly 97 seconds aloft.



JSC2010-E-009871 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009871 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module descending back to Earth following the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module. Nearly 25 seconds into the flight two drogue parachutes deploy (shown) to stabilize the crew module before three pilot parachutes deploy. Thirty-one seconds into the flight three main parachutes deploy for landing after nearly 97 seconds aloft.



JSC2010-E-046311 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-046311 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module 21 seconds into the flight. At 31 seconds into the flight, the drogue chutes are cut away from the crew module and main chute pilot mortars fire to deploy three small pilot parachutes. The pilot chutes immediately extract the three main parachutes. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration



JSC2010-E-046313 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-046313 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion launch abort vehicle descending back to Earth following the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module 21 seconds into the flight. At 31 seconds into the flight, the drogue chutes are cut away from the crew module and main chute pilot mortars fire to deploy three small pilot parachutes. The pilot chutes immediately extract the three main parachutes. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration



JSC2010-E-009872 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009872 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module descending back to Earth following the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module 21 seconds into the flight. Three main parachutes guide the crew module back down to Earth for landing after nearly 97 seconds aloft.



JSC2010-E-009873 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009873 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module descending back to Earth following the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The launch abort system has completed its job and separated from the crew module 21 seconds into the flight. Three main parachutes guide the crew module back down to Earth for landing after nearly 97 seconds aloft.



JSC2010-E-009874 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009874 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module touching down about 90 seconds following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Three main parachutes guide the crew module back down to Earth for landing about one mile downrange from the Orion Abort Flight Test Launch Complex after nearly 97 seconds aloft.



JSC2010-E-009875 -- Artist's rendering of Orion launch abort vehicle + View high-resolution
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JSC2010-E-009875 (January 2010) --- An artist's rendering shows the Orion crew module touching down about 90 seconds following liftoff for the Pad Abort 1 flight test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Three main parachutes guide the crew module back down to Earth for landing about one mile downrange from the Orion Abort Flight Test Launch Complex after nearly 97 seconds aloft.