Image Feature

Using 'Polka Dots' for Precision
05.12.10
 
Rob Black, senior applications engineer with Shape Fidelity Inc., of Huntsville, Ala., a contractor with the Ares I Upper Stage team, sets up for photogrammetry process. Rob Black, senior applications engineer with Shape Fidelity Inc., of Huntsville, Ala., a contractor with the Ares I Upper Stage team, positions one of many targets used on a spun-formed fuel tank dome as he prepares to take photographs – a primary step in the photogrammetry process. (Credit: NASA/MSFC/David Higginbotham)
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Gilbert Handley, quality engineer with Shape Fidelity Inc., positions a three-dimensional, white-light scanner as he scans small sections of a fuel tank panel. Gilbert Handley, quality engineer with Shape Fidelity Inc., of Huntsville, Ala., a contractor with the Ares I Upper Stage team, positions a three-dimensional, white-light scanner as he scans small sections of a fuel tank panel. The scanning process produces an accurate surface definition of the panel – providing a fully functional, 3D engineering model. (Credit: NASA/MSFC/David Higginbotham)
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An optical global framework of a C130 aircraft A skeleton-like outline, referred to as an optical global framework, of a C-130 aircraft is captured at the top of this computer screen. Below it is a section of the aircraft. The software uses the green, computer-generated numbers to identify the targets used in the photogrammetry process. (Credit: Shape Fidelity Inc.)
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Back portion of a C130 aircraft completed in the photogrammetry process In this computer screen image, the back portion of a C-130 aircraft has completed the photogrammetry process. The green dots indicate the location of the photographed targets, which provide the scale of the vehicle. (Credit: Shape Fidelity Inc.)
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An exact, three dimensional, engineering computer-designed model of a C130 aircraft, produced by Capture 3D, using the photogrammetry process. An exact, three-dimensional, engineering computer-designed model of a C-130 aircraft, produced by Capture 3D, using the photogrammetry process. (Credit: Capture 3D)
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Computer-aided design model of a B52 cockpit section and a cockroach At left, a computer-aided design model of a B-52 cockpit section and a cockroach captured with the same system for comparison purposes using the photogrammetry process. Rendered as a three-dimensional model, the roach can be fully measured -- from the length of is antenna down to the exact width of its wing. (Credit: Shape Fidelity Inc.)
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Media Contact:
Jennifer Morcone Stanfield, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
Jennifer.M.Stanfield@nasa.gov