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Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant
08.08.06
These six galaxy clusters are among 38 that scientists observed with Chandra to help determine the Hubble constant.

These six galaxy clusters are a subset of the 38 that scientists observed with Chandra, with distances ranging from 1.4 to 9.3 billion light years from Earth, to help determine the Hubble constant. The Hubble constant, or the Hubble parameter, is a critically important number that sets the expansion rate of the Universe, and is derived by measuring the speeds that the clusters are moving away from us and dividing by the cluster distances.

A combination of X-ray and radio observations allowed astronomers to determine the Hubble constant using the so-called Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. In this phenomenon, photons in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) interact with electrons in the hot gas that pervades the enormous galaxy clusters. The photons acquire energy from this interaction, which distorts the signal from the microwave background in the direction of the clusters. The magnitude of this distortion depends on the density and temperature of the hot electrons and the physical size of the cluster.

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Image credit: NASA/CXC/MSFC/M.Bonamente et al.