Mission News

Panelist Biographies
09.24.09
 

Media Telecon

New Impact Craters on Mars

Ken Edgett , team member, Context Camera, Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego

Shane Byrne is an assistant professor at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona.

Selby Cull is a team member on the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer on the MRO.

Date: Thursday Sept. 24, 2009 Time: 12 pm Pacific Time

Panelists

Ken Edgett Ken Edgett is a senior staff scientist at Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) in San Diego, Calif. Image credit: NASA/JPL
Senior staff scientist at Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) in San Diego, Calif. He is a co-investigator on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Context camera and Mars Color Imager team and he is working with a group of five MSSS personnel to plan the imaging targets for the Context camera on an almost daily basis. From 1998 to 2006, Edgett selected image targets for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter camera. He is the principal investigator of the Mars Hand Lens Imager camera launching aboard the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, in 2011. In 2006, Edgett was the first person to recognize that new impacts were occurring on Mars and that their impact sites were being recorded by NASA's cameras orbiting Mars.












 

Shane Byrnea Shane Byrne is an assistant professor at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, and a member of the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment science team. Image credit: NASA/JPL
His research interests encompass surface processes on planetary bodies throughout the solar system. He is especially interested in those processes that affect, or are driven by, planetary ices. Current work includes modeling how the landscape of the Martian polar caps has evolved, studying the concentration of volatiles in polar craters on the moon and Mercury, fractal descriptions of topography as deduced from Titan's shorelines, and seasonal volatile transport on large asteroids such as Ceres. Byrne moved to the United States in 1998 to pursue graduate studies in Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif. After postdoctoral work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the U.S. Geological Survey, he joined the faculty of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in 2007.













Selby Cull Selby Cull Selby Cull is a team member on the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Image credit: NASA/JPL

She is a doctoral candidate at Washington University in St. Louis in the Earth and Planetary Science Department. Cull is also a member of the Phoenix Science Team.













 
 
Media contacts:
Guy Webster 818-354-6278
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
guy.webster@jpl.nasa.gov

Dwayne Brown 202-358-1726
NASA Headquarters, Washington
dwayne.c.brown@nasa.gov