Feature

More Images from the LCROSS Earth/Moon Look Calibration on Aug. 17, 2009
 
Image from LCROSS Left: A compilation of images taken by LCROSS on August 17, 2009 of the Earth and its moon. North and the direction of the Sun are indicated by arrows.
Image Credit: NASA Ames
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Image from LCROSS Left: This image was taken with the LCROSS visible light context camera with its 30 x 23 degree field of view (FOV), from a distance of approximately 323,296 miles (520,294 km) from the Earth and 547,335 miles (880,850 km) from the moon. In this view, the Earth and moon are separated by approximately 4.8 degrees. The red/blue speckled pixels within the VIS camera are caused by cosmic ray radiation in space, and are not stars.

Image Credit: NASA Ames
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Image from LCROSS Left: Zoomed-in image of the LCROSS visible light context camera image.


Image Credit: NASA Ames
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Near Infrared Image of the Earth and the moon> Left: This is a zoomed-in, 5 x 5 degree subarray FOV, greyscale image (values shown in the greyscale bar) from the near infrared camera #2 (NIR2), that has a wavelength reponse from 0.9-1.7 microns. The linear scale has been adjusted to emphasize the moon appearance, since the moon is much fainter than the Earth in this scene. The image has been rotated to match the same coordinate system as shown for the visible and mid-infrared images.

Image Credit: NASA
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Image from LCROSS Left: A single mid-infrared camera (MIR1), 15 x 11 degree FOV raw image, rotated. The data is plotted on linear scale, min=3755, max=3970. The Earth disk subtends 16 pixels, or approximately 1.6 degrees. The moon (seen in lower left) subtends approximately 1.5 pixels or 0.15 degrees. The Earth and moon centers are separated by approximately 35 pixels in this image (along a diagonal), or approximately 4.8 degrees.

Image Credit: NASA
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