Mission Update

More Images from the Centaur Impact
10.16.09
 
Image of LCROSS impact plume.
Left: Shown is the result of three co-added, stretched LCROSS Visible Light Camera images taken shortly after impact (with 15 seconds following impact). The extent of the plume at 15 sec is approximately 6-8 km in diameter.
Credit: NASA
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Lunar South Pole
Left: LCROSS Visible Light Camera image of the lunar south pole from an altitude of approximately 770 km. Some south pole craters of interest are labeled.
Credit: NASA
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Spectrometer graph of the LCROSS impact flash.
Left: The Ultraviolet (UV)/Visible and Near Infrared down-looking spectrometers monitored the flash of the impact, the ejecta plume and ultimately the reflectance off the floor of Cabeus. The figure shows the total integrated radiance (integrated across all wavelengths measured by each spectrometer) as a function of time relative to the approximate impact time. The notional flash and ejecta plume periods are shown.
Credit: NASA
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Mid-infrared image of the LCROSS Centaur lunar impact.
Left: This image was taken by the mid-infrared camera (MIR1), which is sensitive to wavelengths ranging from 6.0 – 10.0 microns. The thermal signature of the impact is detected clearly by the MIR1 camera and is seen in subsequent images. The yellow arrow points to the thermal signature of the impact as detected by the LCROSS spacecraft. Image resolution is ~4 meters /pixel.
Credit: NASA
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Near-infrared image of the LCROSS lunar impact.
Left: This image was taken by the near infrared camera (NIR2), which is sensitive to wavelengths ranging from 0.9 – 1.7 microns. The near-infrared signature of the impact is detected clearly by the NIR2 camera. The yellow arrow points to the near-infrared signature of the impact as detected by the LCROSS spacecraft. Image resolution is ~2 meters / pixel.
Credit: NASA
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LCROSS impact taken with a mid-infrared camera.
Left: This image was taken by the mid-infrared camera (MIR1), which is sensitive to wavelengths ranging from 6.0 – 10.0 microns. The thermal signature of the impact is detected clearly by the MIR1 camera. The arrow points to the thermal signature of the Centaur impact. This image was collected at an altitude of ~600 kilometers above the lunar surface with a resolution of ~1020 meters / pixel. White colors represent temperatures of approximately +35°C, red colors are approximately +18°C, and dark blue colors are approximately -45°C. Black areas are below -50°C.
Credit: NASA
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LCROSS impact as taken with a mid-infrered camera.
Left: A time series of images collected with the mid-infrared camera (MIR2). The first image (left to right) shows the Cabeus crater before impact while the next image shows this same scene with enhanced contrast stretching and no sign of impact is apparent yet. These frames are followed by images of Cabeus approximately zero, two, four, and six seconds after Centaur impact. The thermal signature of the impact is detected clearly by the MIR2 camera. The arrows point to the thermal signature of the impact as detected by the LCROSS spacecraft. Images are presented in false color and are stretched to enhance contrast. The image resolution ranges from ~1020 meters / pixel at time T=0 to ~990 meters / pixel at time T = +6 seconds.
Credit: NASA
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Mid-infrared images of the LCROSS lunar impact.
Left: A time series of images taken with the mid-infrared camera (MIR1). The first image (left to right) shows the Cabeus crater before impact, followed by images of Cabeus approximately zero, two, and four seconds after Centaur impact. The thermal signature of the impact is detected clearly by the MIR1 camera. The arrows point to the thermal signature of the impact as detected by the LCROSS spacecraft. Images are presented in grayscale (white = hot, black = cold) and are stretched to enhance contrast. The image resolution ranges from ~1020 meters / pixel at time T=0 to ~990 meters / pixel at time T = +4 seconds.
Credit: NASA
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