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ARCTAS Blogging

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Updates from the Arctic

ARCTAS researchers are keeping the rest of us up-to-date on their progress in a blog hosted by Discovery.com.

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Bon Voyage!

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The SO GasEx Experiment

Scientists blog about their extended voyage off the Antarctic coast as part of a mission to study carbon dioxide levels in the ocean and atmosphere.

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Top Story

    Aerosols May Drive a Significant Portion of Arctic Warming

    artist concept of aerosols reflecting light Aerosols can influence climate directly by either reflecting or absorbing the sun's radiation as it moves through the atmosphere. The tiny airborne particles enter the atmosphere from sources such as industrial pollution, volcanoes and residential cooking stoves. Credit: NASA Goddard's Scientific Visualization Studio
    > Larger image
    Though greenhouse gases are invariably at the center of discussions about global climate change, new NASA research suggests that much of the atmospheric warming observed in the Arctic since 1976 may be due to changes in tiny airborne particles called aerosols.

    Emitted by natural and human sources, aerosols can directly influence climate by reflecting or absorbing the sun's radiation. The small particles also affect climate indirectly by seeding clouds and changing cloud properties, such as reflectivity.

    A new study, led by climate scientist Drew Shindell of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, used a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to investigate how sensitive different regional climates are to changes in levels of carbon dioxide, ozone, and aerosols.

    > Read more

    > View "Atmosphere and Climate" archives, images and video

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