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Dave Mould/Dean Acosta
Headquarters, Washington
(Phone: 202/358-1898/1400)

August 12, 2005
 
RELEASE : 05-220
 
 
NASA Announces New Leaders for Science Mission Directorate
 
 
NASA Administrator Michael Griffin announced today Mary Cleave, Ph.D., P.E. will be the associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate. Colleen Hartman, Ph.D., will be the deputy associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate.

Cleave served as the director of NASA’s Earth-Sun System Division in the Science Mission Directorate. She began her NASA career at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) when she was selected as an astronaut in May 1980. She has flown two Space Shuttle missions, logging more than 262 hours in space.

She was a mission specialist for STS 61 B in November 1985 and STS 30 in May 1989. She left JSC in May 1991 to join NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., where she worked in the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes. She was the Project Manager for the Sea viewing Wide Field of view Sensor (SeaWiFS), an ocean color satellite sensor monitoring global marine chlorophyll concentration.

In March 2000, Cleave joined NASA's Office of Earth Science as the deputy associate administrator for Earth Science (Advanced Planning). She was responsible for the formulation of NASA's Earth Science activities.

Cleave received a Bachelor of Science degree in biological sciences from Colorado State University; a Master of Science in microbial ecology and a doctorate in civil and environmental engineering from Utah State University.

Her awards include two NASA Space Flight Medals; two NASA Exceptional Service Medals; American Astronautical Society Flight Achievement Award; NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal; and NASA Engineer of the Year.

Hartman, while serving as a special assistant to the NASA Administrator, served as agency liaison with the assistant to the President for science and technology within the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President.

She has been a senior program executive and scientist for more than 24 years formulating programs, evaluating proposals, and making recommendations and decisions in response to the needs of the science community.

Prior to her White House service, Hartman served as NOAA's deputy associate administrator for Satellite and Information Services. She was responsible for managing NOAA’s civil environmental remote sensing satellites and the three National Data Centers.

As Solar System Exploration Division director, Hartman invigorated space science and technology-related design and development of solar system exploration missions by creatively implementing major components of the President’s Management Agenda.

As the NASA Headquarters Explorer program manager, Hartman coordinated activities involving universities, aerospace corporations, and the agency's space flight centers. She has extensive experience building and launching state-of-the-art scientific balloon and satellite payloads. She joined NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications in Washington in 1981 as a presidential management intern.

Hartman received a Bachelor of Arts degree in zoology from Pomona College; a Master of Arts in public administration from the University of Southern California and a Master of Arts and Ph.D., in physics from the Catholic University of America.

Her awards include the NASA Headquarters Outstanding Performance Award, Clair Luce Booth award for science and engineering and several Group Achievement Awards.

For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html

 

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