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Lunar Exploration Objectives
12.04.06

Almost 200 lunar exploration objectives resulted from the Global Exploration Strategy process. NASA engaged the global space community to develop the objectives by asking the question, "What do we hope to accomplish through lunar exploration?"

NASA took the many answers to this question and compiled them into a comprehensive database of almost 200 different things we could do on the moon! The lunar exploration objectives are meant to capture the entire set of activities that anyone involved in lunar exploration may want to pursue. These activities could be carried out by NASA, another space agency, a private company, a university, or anyone else who invests in space exploration.

Most importantly, each lunar exploration objective can help achieve the broad goals defined by at least one of the lunar exploration themes. For example, the objective "studying craters on the moon" is linked to the "Scientific Knowledge" theme, since studying craters will help us learn more about the moon and the solar system. By linking the objectives to the themes, organizations such as NASA can better understand the specific activities necessary to accomplish the goals.

NASA will take ideas from the lunar exploration themes and objectives and begin to lay out a timeline for what NASA plans to do on the moon.

+ Download the Lunar Objectives (600 KB Excel Spreadsheet)
+ Download the Lunar Objectives (900 KB PDF)
+ Read More on the Lunar Themes and Objectives Development Process

The themes and objectives are meant to capture the entire set of activities that anyone involved in lunar exploration (a space agency, private firm, university, or other) may want to pursue, as developed by the process described previously. The themes and objectives do not set forth U.S. government or NASA policy. They do not establish a set of activities that NASA or any member of the global space community intends to pursue. The themes and objectives do not reflect whether domestic legislation, international agreements, or both would be necessary to carry them out.

NASA merely facilitated development of these themes and objectives, which are simply one data set to consider as the United States and its potential international partners begin to define lunar exploration architectures.