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10-27-2010
October 27, 2010
 
ISS On-Orbit Status 10/27/10

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

  • At Baikonur/Kazakhstan, the new cargo ship Progress M-08M/40P was launched today on time at 11:11am EDT (9:11pm local time) on a Soyuz-U rocket. Ascent was nominal, and all spacecraft systems are without issues. Docking to the ISS at the DC1 (Docking Compartment) nadir port is planned for Saturday (10/30) at ~12:40pm.

At wake-up, FE-2 Skripochka conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Oleg again inspects the filters before bedtime tonight, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

After wake-up, CDR Wheelock, FE-6 Walker & FE-3 Kelly performed another session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol. [The RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

Also at day’s begin, Oleg Skripochka terminated his 2nd experiment session, started last night, for the long-term Russian sleep study MBI-12/Sonokard, taking the recording device from his Sonokard sports shirt pocket and later copying the measurements to the RSE-Med laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

FE-1 Kaleri configured the hardware for the Russian MBI-21 PNEVMOKARD experiment, then conducted the 1h15m session, his first, which forbids moving or talking during data recording. Oleg took documentary photography. The experiment is controlled from the RSE-med A31p laptop and uses the TENZOPLUS sphygmomanometer to measure arterial blood pressure. The experiment was then closed out and the test data were downlinked via OCA. [PNEVMOKARD (Pneumocard) attempts to obtain new scientific information to refine the understanding about the mechanisms used by the cardiorespiratory system and the whole body organism to spaceflight conditions. By recording (on PCMCIA cards) the crewmember’s electrocardiogram, impedance cardiogram, low-frequency phonocardiogram (seismocardiogram), pneumotachogram (using nose temperature sensors), and finger photoplethismogram, the experiment supports integrated studies of (1) the cardiovascular system and its adaptation mechanisms in various phases of a long-duration mission, (2) the synchronization of heart activity and breathing factors, as well as the cardiorespiratory system control processes based on the variability rate of physiological parameters, and (3) the interconnection between the cardiorespiratory system during a long-duration mission and the tolerance of orthostatic & physical activities at the beginning of readaptation for predicting possible reactions of the crewmembers organism during the their return to ground.]

Working on the ESA VIS (Vessel ID) System, Doug Wheelock replaced the operational receiver unit with a stowed receiver. [Steps included deinstalling the anomalous LUXAIS receiver and installing the NORAIS receiver instead, including making cable connections and taking documentary photography. ESA’s ship tracking system is on an experimental run alongside the Norwegian AISSat-1 satellite with its own AIS (Automatic Identification System), the short range coastal traffic system used by ship and vessel traffic services around the world, launched last July (7/12). NORAIS (Norwegian AIS) is an improvement and advancement of AIS. The alternate LUXAIS receiver was developed in Luxembourg by LuxSpace and EmTronix. The primary goals of the ISS-based VIS NORAIS/LUXAIS experiment are to receive and decode AIS messages globally, as well as to aid in the development of an operational system. The system is financed under the ESA GSTP (General Support Technology).]

Afterwards, the CDR accessed and prepared the OGS (Oxygen Generator System) for taking water samples of the OGS recirculation loop which is under investigation for off-nominal water quality. After sample collection, the sampling gear was torn down again.

Doug also had ~45 min set aside for troubleshooting the Node-3/Cupola PCS (Portable Computer System) laptop. [The troubleshooting (bus issue) was not successful and will be continued.]

In the US A/L (Airlock), the CDR made preparations for the two planned ULF5 EVAs (Extravehicular Activities). Wheels and Scott then unstowed and transferred equipment required for the spacewalks.

Alex Kaleri conducted his first onboard session of the Russian MedOps assessment MO-12, (“Study of the Veins in the Lower Extremities”), using the KARDIOMED (Cardiomed) complex with orthogonal leads in the SM. [After loading the RSE-med laptop with the Cardiomed software, Sasha set up the equipment, which involves KARDIOMED-TsB, KARDIOMED-KP, KARDIOMED-PMO and KARDIOMED-KRM assemblies with ECG (electrocardiogram) electrodes in a HOLTER monitor harness, a PLETISMOGRAF (Plethysmograph) instrument with calf measuring cuff, pneumatic hose, thigh occlusion cuff, hand pump & valve, and a DOPPLER complex. A Plethysmograph (sometimes called a “body box”) is an instrument for measuring changes in volume within an organ or the whole body (usually resulting from fluctuations in the amount of blood or air it contains).]

Alex also performed his first data collection for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie (“Interactions”) program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. [The software has a “mood” questionnaire, a “group & work environment” questionnaire, and a “critical incidents” log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Before sleeptime tonight, Kaleri sets up the Russian MBI-12 payload and starts his 2nd Sonokard experiment session, using a sports shirt from the Sonokard kit with a special device in the pocket for testing a new method for acquiring physiological data without using direct contact on the skin. Measurements are recorded on a data card for return to Earth. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

Kelly had ~1h45m set aside to use the MAS (Microbial Air Sampler) kit for taking the periodic microbiology (bacterial & fungal) air samples from two specific sampling locations in the SM, Node-1, Lab and Node-3 as well as mid-module in JPM (JEM Pressurized Module). Later, Scott also had ~2h15m more to collect surface samples in the Lab using the Microbiology SSK (Surface Sampling Kit). [After a 5-day incubation period, the air & surface samples will be subjected on 11/1 to visual analysis & data recording with the surface slides and Petri dishes of the MAS & SSK.]

After familiarizing himself with the procedures for the SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) research program by reviewing reference files, Scott Kelly conducted a teleconference with the PD (Payload Developer) at ~12:55pm to discuss procedures. [SPHERES was originally developed to demonstrate the basics of formation flight and autonomous docking, using beacons as reference for the satellites, to fly formation with or dock to the beacon. A number of programs define various incremental tests including attitude control (performing a series of rotations), attitude-only tracking, attitude and range tracking, docking with handheld and mounted beacons, etc. The payload consists of up to three self-contained 8-inch dia. free-floating satellites which perform the various algorithms (control sequences), commanded and observed by the crew members which provide feedback to shape algorithm development. Each satellite has 12 thrusters and a tank with CO2 for propellant. In addition, there are 5 beacons, one beacon tester and a seat track extender for Beacon 5. The first tests, in May 2006, used only one satellite (plus two beacons – one mounted and one hand-held); a second satellite arrived on ULF1.1, the third on 12A.1. Formation flight and autonomous docking are important enabling technologies for distributed architectures.]

Afterwards, FE-3 performed the periodic inspection of the CGBA-4 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 4) and CGBA-5 payloads in their ERs (EXPRESS Racks).

Scott also serviced the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids & Crystallization) experiment in ER4 (EXPRESS Rack 4) by replacing the RHDD (Removable Hard Disk Drive) #003 in the DECLIC ELL (Electronics Locker) with a new one (#005).

FE-6 Walker set up the PPFS (Portable Pulmonary Function System) hardware in COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), including MBS (Mixing Bag System), and then conducted her 4th session with the VO2max assessment, integrated with Thermolab. After concluding without issues, Shannon downloaded the data, including Thermolab, to a PCS (Portable Computer System) laptop, powered down, cleaned up and temporarily moved all hardware aside for Wheels’ VO2max session tomorrow. [The experiment VO2max uses the PPFS, CEVIS ergometer cycle, PFS (Pulmonary Function System) gas cylinders and mixing bag system, plus multiple other pieces of hardware to measure oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and more. The exercise protocol consists of a 2-min rest period, then three 5-min stages at workloads eliciting 25%, 50% & 75% of aerobic capacity as measured pre-flight, followed by a 25-watt increase in workload every minute until the crewmember reaches maximum exercise capacity. At that point, CEVIS workload increase is stopped, and a 5-min cool down period follows at the 25% load. Rebreathing measurements are initiated by the subject during the last minute of each stage. Constraints are: no food 2 hrs prior to exercise start, no caffeine 8 hrs prior to exercise, and must be well hydrated.]

Shannon Walker & Fyodor Yurchikhin undertook the standard 30-min Shuttle RPM (R-bar Pitch Maneuver) onboard skill training, the third for both of them, using D2X digital still cameras with 400 (Shannon) & 800mm (Fyodor) lenses to take in-cabin target imagery using an Orbiter tile diagram. Afterwards, FE-6 downlinked the obtained photographs for ground analysis. [The RPM drill prepares crewmembers for the bottom-side mapping of the Orbiter at the arrival of the Shuttle (STS-133/Discovery/ULF-5) on 11/3. During the RPM at ~600 ft from the station, the “shooters” have only ~90 seconds for taking high-resolution digital photographs of all tile areas and door seals on Discovery, to be downlinked for launch debris assessment. Thus, time available for the shooting will be very limited, requiring great coordination between the two headset-equipped photographers and the Shuttle pilot.]

With the BITS2-12 onboard measurement telemetry system & VD-SU control mode temporarily deactivated, Skripochka & Yurchikhin spent several hours replacing the BTA heat exchanger unit of the RS (Russian Segment) SKV2 air conditioner.

Afterwards, Oleg worked in the SM on the BITS2-12 system itself, replacing one (ZU1A) of its four ZU memory/recording devices (EA025M) with another unit (ZU2B). [BITS2-12 is the primary telemetry downlink path for both FGB and SM parameters. The system collects, records, and transmits measurement data concerning all RS systems, science hardware and health status parameters of crewmembers to the ground. It provides ground specialists with insight in RS systems operations.]

BITS2-12 & VD-SU control mode were turned on again afterwards, allowing the Russian Elektron O2 generator to be reactivated by ground commanding, with Skripochka monitoring the external temperature of its secondary purification unit (BD) for the first 10 minutes of operations to ensure that there was no overheating. [Temperature is checked twice, about 3-4 minutes apart, with the MultiMeter with temperature probe. The standard manual check is required because the gas analyzer used on the Elektron during nominal operations for detecting hydrogen (H2) in the O2 line (which could cause overheating) is not included in the control algorithm until 10 minutes after Elektron startup. Elektron had to be turned off while the BITS2-12 onboard telemetry measurement system & VD-SU control mode were temporarily deactivated for EA025M maintenance.]

Oleg completed another photography session for the DZZ-13 “Seiner” ocean observation program, obtaining NIKON D3 photos with Nikkor 80-200 mm lens and the SONY HD video camcorder on oceanic water color bloom patterns in the waters of the South-Western Atlantic, then copying the images to the RSK-1 laptop,

FE-2 also initiated overnight (10-hr) charging of the KPT-2 Piren battery for the new Piren-V Pyro-endoscope, part of the Russian BAR science instruments suite (other BAR components being the ТТМ-2 Anemometer-Thermometer, the charger cable, and the video display unit). [Piren-V, a video-endoscope with pyrosensor, is part of the methods & means being used on ISS for detecting tiny leaks in ISS modules which could lead to cabin depressurization. Objective of the Russian KPT-12/EXPERT science payload is to measure environmental parameters (temperature, humidity, air flow rate) and module shell surface temperatures behind SM panels and other areas susceptible to possible micro-destruction (corrosion), before and after insolation (day vs. night). Besides Piren-V, the payload uses a remote infrared thermometer (Kelvin-Video), a thermohygrometer (Iva-6A), a heat-loss thermoanemometer/thermometer (TTM-2) and an ultrasound analyzer (AU) to determine environmental data in specific locations and at specific times. Activities include documentary photography with the NIKON D2X camera and flash.]

Starting at ~11:20am, Shannon had 1h20min set aside for an in-depth audio/teleconference with ground specialists to discuss the upcoming Robotics work with the SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) in support of ULF5, in particular the transfer of the PMM (Permanent Multi-purpose Module) “Leonardo”.

After completing recharge of its battery, Kaleri installed the hardware of the GFI-1 “Relaksatsiya” (Relaxation) Earth Observation experiment at SM window #1 and then used it to observe & measure the high-rate interaction spectra of the Earth’s ionosphere. [Using the GFI-1 UFKFialka” ultraviolet camera, SP spectrometer and HD (High Definition) camcorder, the experiment observes the Earth atmosphere and surface from window #1, with spectrometer measurements controlled from Laptop 3. “Relaxation”, in Physics, is the transition of an atom or molecule from a higher energy level to a lower one, emitting radiative energy in the process as equilibrium is achieved.]

Sasha also completed the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance by updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Oleg did the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers and replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers.]

Wheelock performed the periodic T2 snubber arm inspection on the T2/COLBERT treadmill, checking the joints of the arm stacks to track the structural integrity of the hardware following exercise sessions.

CDR, FE-3 & FE-6 had their standard PMCs (Private Medical Conferences), via S- & Ku-band audio/video, Wheels at ~1:10pm, Scott at ~10:10am, Shannon at ~10:45am EDT.

At ~4:40pm, Shannon is scheduled for her weekly PFC (Private Family Conference) via S-band/audio and Ku-band/MS-NetMeeting application (which displays the uplinked ground video on an SSC laptop).

The crew worked out on today’s 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (CDR, FE-3), TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (FE-1, FE-2, FE-5), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (CDR, FE-3, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (FE-6) and VELO ergometer bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1, FE-2, FE-5). [T2 snubber arm inspection is no longer needed after every T2 session but must be done after the last T2 session of the day.]

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) photo targets uplinked for today were Chiloe Island, Southern Chile (Beagle Site: Looking right of track for this large, rugged and forested island as ISS approached the southern coast of Chile from the southwest. Trying for context views of the island as a whole. Darwin arrived at this island on June 12, 1834), Villarrica Volcano, Chile (looking left of track at the line of glacial lakes extending at right angles away from track as your visual cue, with Villarrica between two of these lakes. Shooting along the line of lakes to capture the target. Snow-covered Villarrica is one of Chile's most active volcanoes and one of only four worldwide known to have an active lava lake within its crater), and La Paz, Bolivia (La Paz has a population of 1 to 2 million and is the world’s highest capital city, at over 10,000 feet elevation. Looking right for this target as ISS approached the Andes from the southwest. The city is located in the western part of the country, less than 50 miles southeast of Lake Titicaca).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 7.00 am EDT [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 353.2 km
Apogee height – 358.6 km
Perigee height – 347.9 km
Period -- 91.60 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.65 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0007966
Solar Beta Angle -- 31.3 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.72
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 90 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 68,427.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/27/10 -- Progress M-08M/40P launch (11:12am EDT)
10/30/10 -- Progress M-08M/40P docking (~12:39:30pm EDT)
11/01/10 -- STS-133/Discovery launch (ULF5 – ELC4, PMM) ~4:40pm EDT
11/03/10 -- STS-133/Discovery docking ~1:13pm EDT
11/07/10 -- --------------Daylight Saving Time ends-----------
11/10/10 -- STS-133/Discovery undock ~5:40am EST
11/12/10 -- STS-133/Discovery landing (KSC) ~10:39am EST
11/15/10 -- Progress M-05M/37P deorbit
11/15/10 -- Russian EVA-26
11/30/10 -- Soyuz TMA-19/23S undock/landing (End of Increment 25)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/13/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S launch – Kondratyev (CDR-27)/Coleman/Nespoli
12/15/10 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/20/10 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
01/24/11 -- Progress M-08M/40P undock
01/28/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P launch
01/31/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P docking
02/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch
02/27/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour (ULF6 – ELC3, AMS-02)
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/20/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S launch – A. Borisienko (CDR-28)/R.Garan/A.Samokutayev
03/22/11 -- Soyuz TMA-21/26S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
04/26/11 -- Progress M-09M/41P undock
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
04/29/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P docking
05/xx/11 -- Russian EVA-29
05/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock/landing (End of Increment 27)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/20/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/21/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/23/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
03/14/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
03/28/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------