Text Size

06-13-2012
June 13, 2012
ISS On-Orbit Status 06/13/12

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

After wakeup, FE-1 Padalka performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

FE-6 Don Pettit had Day 2 of the pH test and diet log entry for the Pro K pH plus controlled diet menu protocol of his 5th Pro K Controlled Diet activity. Later in the day Don set up for the associated urine collections starting tomorrow, followed by blood sampling on 6/15. [For the Pro K (Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery) protocol, there are five in-flight sessions (FD15, FD30, FD60, FD120, FD180) of samplings, to be shared with the NUTRITION w/Repository protocol, each one with five days of diet & urine pH logging and photography on the last day. The crewmember prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken. Urine collections are spread over 24 hrs; samples go into the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) within 30 min after collection. Blood samples, on the last day, are centrifuged in the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and placed in MELFI at -80 degC. There is an 8-hr fasting requirement prior to the blood draw (i.e., no food or drink, but water ingestion is encouraged). MELFI constraints: Maximum MELFI Dewar open time: 60 sec; at least 45 min between MELFI dewar door openings. Background on pH: In chemistry, pH (Potential Hydrogen) is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a watery solution. Pure water is neutral, with a pH close to 7.0 at 25 degC. Solutions with a pH less than 7 are “acidic” and solutions with a pH greater than 7 are “basic” or “alkaline”. pH measurements are important in medicine, biology, chemistry, agriculture, forestry, food science, environmental science, oceanography, civil engineers and many others.]

FE-5 Kuipers started another sampling run with the AQM (Air Quality Monitor), deactivating the system ~5 hrs later. [Consisting of the EHS GC/DMS (Environmental Health Systems Gas Chromatograph / Differential Mobility Spectrometer), the system is controlled with “Sionex” expert software from the SSC (Station Support Computer)-12 laptop. The AQM demonstrates COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf) technology for identifying volatile organic compounds, similar to the VOA (Volatile Organics Analyzer). This evaluation will continue over the course of several months as it helps to eventually certify the GC/DMS as nominal CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) hardware],

André also performed the approximately weekly WRS (Water Recovery System) sampling using the TOCA (Total Organic Carbon Analyzer), after first initializing the software and priming (filling) the TOCA water sample hose. [After the approximately 2-hr TOCA analysis, results were transferred to an SSC (Station Support Computer) laptop via USB drive for downlink, and the data were also logged.]

Sergei Revin performed the regular (weekly) inspection of the replaceable half-coupling of the 4GB4 hydraulic unit of cooling loop KOB-2, checking for coolant fluid hermeticity (leak-tightness).

After the replacement of a failed fuse for the Amine Swingbed’s valve motor last week, Joe Acaba today reviewed the procedures for the upcoming first test of the hardware, including the structural integrity (bead) check attempted in January this year. [Background: The Amine Swingbed, consisting of the Amine Swingbed, Controller with Vacuum Line, Mounting Plate, Mounting Hardware, Strain Relief Mounting Hardware, Electrostatic Symbol Decal) is a prototype of the CO2 and moisture control technology to be used in the Orion MPCV (Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle). It consists of two multilayer sorbent beds in one unit, with a single valve to alternate (“swing”) them between adsorbing from cabin air and desorbing to space vacuum. The system pulls air from the ISS atmosphere, dries it (and heats it) with a desiccant wheel, cools it back down, scrubs most of the CO2 and remaining water vapor out, then reheats the scrubbed air, rehumidifies it (and recools it) with the desiccant wheel, then returns the air to the cabin. Periodically (every 6 - 30 min) the sorbent beds are swapped to expose the freshly vacuum-desorbed bed to the process stream and start regenerating the CO2-laden bed. During bed swap transitions, additional air is saved by equalizing the bed about to be vented with a compressor-evacuated volume. This will be the first test of the Amine Swingbed payload. Its purpose is to determine if a vacuum-regenerated amine system can effectively remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the ISS atmosphere using a smaller more efficient vacuum regeneration system. A similar technology (amine-based pressure swing adsorption) was used on the Shuttle Extended Duration Orbiter, in the form of the RCRS (Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Removal System). The Amine Swingbed payload uses an amine with a significantly greater capacity for CO2 than the RCRS. Amines are organic compounds and functional groups that contain a basic nitrogen atom with two “lone pair” electrons. They are derivatives of ammonia (NH3) wherein one or more of the hydrogen atoms (H) have been replaced by a substituent such as an alkyl or aryl group. Important amines include amino acids, biogenic amines, trimethylamine, and aniline. Inorganic derivatives of ammonia are also called ammonia, such as chloramine (NClH2).]

In the JAXA JPM (JEM Pressurized Module), Joe later reviewed procedures for the CFE VG2 (Capillary Flow Experiments / Vane Gap 2) experiment, then prepared the MWA WSA (Maintenance Work Area / Work Surface Area) and conducted a 2h15m test session with the VG2 vessel. The equipment was then torn down and stowed away. [CFE takes advantage of the station’s micro-G environment to investigate the special dynamics of capillary flow, i.e., the interaction of liquid with solid that can draw a fluid up a narrow tube and can be exploited to control fluid orientation so that fluid systems on spacecraft perform predictably. Joe performed the “Vane Gap 2” portion of the CFE suite, a study of capillary flow when there is a gap between interior corners of fluid containers, such as in the gap formed by an interior vane and tank wall of a large propellant storage tank, or the near intersection of vanes in a tank with a complex vane network. Interest is in the critical wetting angles and determination of the hysteresis to a higher accuracy than before. CFE results will have applications to management of liquid fuels, cryogens, water-based solutions, and thermal fluids in spacecraft systems.]

CDR Kononenko conducted his 2nd onboard session of the Russian MedOps assessment MO-12, (“Study of the Veins in the Lower Extremities”), using the KARDIOMED (Cardiomed) complex with orthogonal leads. [After loading the RSE-med laptop with the Cardiomed software, Oleg set up the equipment, which involves KARDIOMED-TsB, KARDIOMED-KP, KARDIOMED-PMO and KARDIOMED-KRM assemblies with ECG (electrocardiogram) electrodes in a HOLTER monitor harness, a PLETISMOGRAF (Plethysmograph) instrument with calf measuring cuff, pneumatic hose, thigh occlusion cuff, hand pump & valve, and a DOPPLER complex. A Plethysmograph (sometimes called a “body box”) is an instrument for measuring changes in volume within an organ or the whole body (usually resulting from fluctuations in the amount of blood or air it contains).]

Afterwards, Oleg undertook a 1h40m audit/inventory of the IP-1 air flow sensors in the RS, documenting them with photography.

Revin & Padalka unstowed and set up the educational experiment OBR-1/Fizika-Obrazovaniye, then started another session with the “Physics-Phase” demo, several times taking photographs of the experiment and recording the activity on video. [Obrazovaniye (Education) is a suite of three educational demonstrations of physics in micro-G, viz., OBR-1-1/”Fizika-LT” (Motion), OBR-1-2/”Fizika-Faza” (Phase) and OBR-1-3/”Fizika-Otolit”. The current “Phase” demo studies a complete gas-liquid phase separation of fine dispersion particles in micro-G with diffusion and surface tension of the fluid. The experiment is conducted over several days, documented with photography.]

Working in the ESA COL (Columbus Orbital Facility), André Kuipers worked several hours on the inspection and cleaning of two TCS WOOVs (Thermal Control System Water On/OFF Valves), nos. 9 & 10, today focusing on no. 10. [Front rack stowage had to be temporarily relocated from D1 & D2 to O4 & O3 ZSR (Zero-G Storage Rack) rack front to make room, followed by setting up the MWA (Maintenance Work Area) on A2, and installing/adjusting VC1 (Video Camera 1) & VC2 to cover the WOOV9(10) and MWA installation locations for ground monitoring. TCS WOOV10 was then inspected, cleaned, disinfected and encapsulated. Inspection and cleaning was repeated later after the COL TCS system had been properly configured by the ground.]

At ~1:20pm EDT, Kuipers concluded his 5th (R-15) ICV Ambulatory Monitoring session, doffing the two Actiwatches and HM2 (Holter Monitor 2) about 24 hrs after the end of yesterday’s “midpoint” activity (~12:45pm), then powered on the laptop and downloaded the data from the two Actiwatch Spectrums, copied the data from the 2 HM2 HiFi CF Cards to the HRF PC and downloaded Cardiopres data. [For the ICV Ambulatory Monitoring session, during the first 24 hrs (while all devices are worn), ten minutes of quiet, resting breathing are timelined to collect data for a specific analysis. The nominal exercise includes at least 10 minutes at a heart rate ≥120 bpm (beats per minute). After 24 hrs, the Cardiopres/BP is doffed and the HM2 HiFi CF Card and AA Battery are changed out to allow continuation of the session for another 24 hours, with the Makita batteries switched as required. After data collection is complete, the Actiwatches and both HM2 HiFi CF Cards are downloaded to the HRF PC1, while Cardiopres data are downloaded to the EPM (European Physiology Module) Rack and transferred to the HRF PC1 via a USB key for downlink.]

FE-2 Revin spent several hours in the FGB, using microbial growth wipes and Fungistat disinfectant to clean areas on structure surfaces and behind wall panels which have shown some microbial contamination in the past. [Today’s treatment focused on spaces behind panels 201, 301, 401, 116, 316, 231, 431, then on the VT-7 GZhT4 gas/liquid heat exchanger fan grille. The time-consuming work requires clearing cargo out of the way, removing bungees, photographing enclosure spaces, etc. Areas of interest are accessible frame sections, attachments, mounting bracket, pressurized shell surface areas, panel internal surfaces, etc.]

FE-3 Acaba performed troubleshooting activities on LHAs (Light Housing Assemblies) in Lab, Node-2, JPM (JEM Pressurized Module) and COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory). [There are 7 GLAs (General Luminaire Assemblies) currently out on ISS. The troubleshooting determines if it’s the BBA (Baseplate Ballast Assembly) or LHA that’s failed. There are sufficient spares on board, but the sparing plan is based on scavenging GLAs from ATV (Automated Transfer Vehicle) and HTV (H-2 Transfer Vehicle).]

With the RS STTS audio comm systems temporarily configured for crew research in MRM2 (Mini Research Module 2), FE-1 Padalka conducted another active session for the Russian experiment KPT-10 “Kulonovskiy Kristall” (Coulomb Crystal), followed by downlinking the video footage obtained with a SONY HVR-Z1J camcorder over an RGS (Russian Groundsite) pass (7:22am �C 7:39am) and reconfiguring STTS to nominal. [KPT-10 studies dynamic and structural characteristics of the Coulomb systems formed by charged dispersed diamagnetic macroparticles in the magnetic trap, investigating the following processes onboard the ISS RS: condensed dust media, Coulomb crystals, and formation of Coulomb liquids due to charged macroparticles. Coulomb systems are structures following Coulomb’s Law, a law of physics describing the electrostatic interaction between electrically charged particles. It was essential to the development of the theory of electromagnetism.]

In the JAXA Kibo module, Don Pettit set up the G1 camcorder for ground monitoring and serviced the MSPR CC (Multipurpose Small Payload Rack / Combustion Chamber) by greasing its QDs. [Steps included setting the CC up on the MSPR work bench, removing its top plate and applying lubricant (grease) on the seal surface of female QDs (quick disconnects). Male & female QDs of the CC and WV (Work Volume) were then connected. After re-attaching the top plate, the CC was restowed in the JLP (JEM Logistics Pressurized Segment), the G1 video downlink was stopped and the activities closed out.]

Afterwards, FE-6 worked in the Lab on the NanoRacks Module 9, activating mixing tube 7.

FE-5 André Kuipers conducted the 10th onboard JAXA HAIR experiment, collecting hair samples from Don Pettit, then inserting them into MELFI-1, Dewar 1/Tray A set at -95 degC and closing out the activity.

The CDR completed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

FE-2 Revin conducted the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Oleg, André & Don donned their intravehicular Sokol pressure suits and performed the standard fit-check in their body-contoured Kazbek-U couches in the TMA-03M/29S spacecraft (#703, docked at MRM1 Rassvet), a 20-min job. [This required them to get in their shock-absorbing seats and use a ruler to measure the gap between the top of the head and the top edge of the structure facing the head. The results were to be reported to TsUP. Kazbek-U couches are designed to withstand g-loads during launch and orbital insertion as well as during reentry and brake-rocket-assisted landing. Each seat has two positions: cocked (armed) and non-cocked. In the cocked position, they are raised to allow the shock absorbers to function during touchdown. The fit check assures that the crewmember whose body gains in length during longer-term stay in zero-G, will still be adequately protected by the seat liners for their touchdown in Kazakhstan. 29S return is scheduled for 7/1.]

The six crewmembers, with mission control centers standing by, undertook the periodic Emergency Drill/OBT (Onboard Training), practicing response, communication & coordination between the Soyuz 29S & 30S crews in case of an ammonia (NH3) spill, reviewing procedures and actions to be taken for a fire emergency on-board the ISS (locating, extinguishing & mitigating), followed by a joint review of the practice session and a teleconference with ground specialists at ~11:00am EDT.

FE-3 & FE-6 had their standard weekly PMCs (Private Medical Conferences), via S- & Ku-band audio/video, Joe at ~11:35am, Don at ~12:45pm EDT.

At ~6:20am, Joe Acaba powered up the SM's amateur radio equipment (Kenwood VHF transceiver with manual frequency selection, headset, & power supply) and at 6:30am conducted a ham radio session with students at St. Anne's Primary School, Strathfield South, NSW, Australia.

At ~11:15am, the crew had their weekly teleconference with ISS Program Management at JSC/Houston via Ku-band/video & S-band/audio.

Don had a time slot/placeholder reserved for making entries in his electronic Journal on the personal SSC. [Required are three journaling sessions per week.]

Before Presleep, FE-6 will turn on the MPC (Multi-Protocol Converter) and start the Ku-band data flow of video recorded during the day to the ground, with POIC (Payload Operations & Integration Center) routing the onboard HRDL (High-Rate Data Link). After about an hour, Don turns MPC routing off again. [This is a routine operation which regularly transmits HD onboard video (live or tape playback) to the ground on a daily basis before sleeptime.]

Before sleeptime, the CDR will prepare the Russian MBI-12 payload and start a session with his 7th Sonokard experiment, using a sports shirt from the Sonokard kit with a special device in the pocket for testing a new method for acquiring physiological data without using direct contact on the skin. Measurements are recorded on a data card for return to Earth. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

The crew worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the TVIS treadmill with vibration isolation & stabilization (CDR/2x, FE-1, FE-2), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (FE-1, FE-3, FE-5, E-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (FE-3, FE-5, FE-6), and VELO bike ergometer with load trainer (FE-2). [FE-6 is on the special experimental SPRINT protocol which diverts from the regular 2.5 hrs per day exercise regime and introduces special daily sessions involving resistive and aerobic (interval & continuous) exercise, followed by a USND (Ultrasound) leg muscle self scan in COL. No exercise is being timelined for Fridays. If any day is not completed, Don picks up where he left off, i.e., he would be finishing out the week with his last day of exercise on his off day. If any day is not completed, Don picks up where he left off, i.e., he would be finishing out the week with his last day of exercise on his off day.]

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
07/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
07/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S launch �C S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
07/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking
07/20/12 -- HTV3 launch (~10:18pm EDT)
07/22/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undock
07/24/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P re-docking
07/30/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P undocking/deorbit
07/31/12 -- Progress M16M/48P launch
08/02/12 -- Progress M16M/48P docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
10/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch �C K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitsky/E.Tarelkin
10/17/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/01/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P launch
11/03/12 -- Progress M-17M/49P docking
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
12/05/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch �C C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
12/26/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P launch
12/28/12 -- Progress M-18M/50P docking
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch �C P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch �C M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch �C M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch �C K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 -- Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------