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01-24-2012
January 24, 2012
ISS On-Orbit Status 01/24/12

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

  • Progress M-13M/45P undocked last night successfully at 5:09pm EST from the DC1 Docking Compartment. Tonight at ~6:19pm the GFI-28 MIKROSPUTNIK Chibis-M will be deployed from the open GrO cargo compartment.

After wakeup, FE-2 Ivanishin performed the routine inspection of the SM (Service Module) PSS Caution & Warning panel as part of regular Daily Morning Inspection.

CDR Burbank, FE-5 Kuipers & FE-6 Pettit each completed another post-sleep session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol, the 17th for Dan, the 10th for André and Don. The three crewmembers will perform their RST sleep shift session starting today and every day through 2/2. [RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

FE-6 Pettit continued his 2nd (FD30) suite of sessions with Day 2 of the medical protocol Pro K (Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery), with diet logging after the urine pH spot test, for a 5-day period. [For Pro K, there are five in-flight sessions (FD15, FD30, FD60, FD120, FD180) of samplings, to be shared with the NUTRITION w/Repository protocol, each one with five days of diet & urine pH logging and photography on the last day (science sessions are often referred to by Flight Day 15, 30, 60, etc. However, there are plus-minus windows associated with these time points so a “Flight Day 15” science session may not actually fall on the crewmember’s 15th day on-orbit). The crewmember prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken. Urine collections are spread over 24 hrs; samples go into the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) within 30 min after collection. Blood samples, on the last day, are centrifuged in the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and placed in MELFI at -80 degC. There is an 8-hr fasting requirement prior to the blood draw (i.e., no food or drink, but water ingestion is encouraged). MELFI constraints: Maximum MELFI dewar open time: 60 sec; at least 45 min between MELFI dewar door openings.]

CDR Burbank terminated the vacuum pump-out of the MCA (Major Constituent Analyzer), which he started yesterday.

Before breakfast & exercise, FE-1 Shkaplerov & FE-2 Ivanishin each completed a 10-min session with the periodic Russian MedOps test MO-10 "Hematokrit", which measures the red cell count of the blood, with one of them acting as CMO (Crew Medical Officer, Russian: “Examiner”). Anton then stowed the equipment. It was the 2nd for both of them. [The blood samples were drawn from a finger with a perforator lancet, then centrifuged in two microcapillary tubes in the M-1100 kit's minicentrifuge, and its Hematocrit value was read off the tubes with a magnifying glass. It is a well-known phenomenon of space flight that red blood cell count (normal range: 30-45%) tends to go down over time. After the exam, the data were saved in the IFEP software (In-Flight Examination Program) on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer).]

FE-4 Kononenko took his first MBI-24 “SPRUT-2” (“Squid-2”) test, part of Russian medical research on the distribution and behavior of human body fluids in zero gravity, along with PZEh-MO-8 body mass measurement using the IM device. [Supported by the RSS-Med A31p laptop with new software (Vers. 1.6) in the SM, the test uses the Profilaktika kit, with data recorded on PCMCIA memory cards, along with Sergey’s body mass values and earlier recorded MO-10 Hematocrit value, but skipping “fat fold” measurements. Experiment requisites are the Sprut securing harness, skin electrodes (cuffs), and RSS-Med for control and data storage. The “Pinguin” suit or Braslet-M cuffs, if worn, have to be taken off first. Electrode measurements are recorded at complete rest and relaxed body position. The actual recording takes 3-5 minutes, during which the patient has to remain at complete rest.]

FE-5 Kuipers performed test validation the UMS (Urine Monitoring System) using two drink bags of 100 ml of water each. [Steps included setting up the UMS in the WHC, arranging the Node-3 camcorder to capture Kabin video of the UMS installation & operations, connecting the SSC-11 (Station Support Computer 11) laptop, configuring WHC to internal EDV-U and opening the UPA (Urine Processor Assembly) T-Valve. Afterwards, WHC was then re-configured to integrate UPA until ARFTA (Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly) fill begins, with the UPA T-Valve moved back to WHC position.]

In preparation, Progress M-14M/46P (#414) docking at the DC1 (Docking Compartment) nadir port on 1/27 (next Friday, ~7:09p EST), FE-1 Shkaplerov & FE-4 Kononenko worked through the standard 3-hr refresher training for the TORU teleoperator system, which provides a manual backup mode to the Progress’ KURS automated rendezvous radar system. [The drill included procedure review, rendezvous, docking data and rendezvous math modeling data review, fly-around, final approach, docking and off-nominal situations (e.g., video or comm loss). Three different flight conditions were simulated on the RSK1 laptop. The TORU teleoperator control system lets a SM-based crewmember perform the approach and docking of automated Progress vehicles in case of KURS failure. During spacecraft approach, TORU is in “hot standby” mode. Receiving a video image of the approaching ISS, as seen from a Progress-mounted docking television camera (“Klest”), on a color monitor (“Simvol-Ts”, i.e. “symbol center”) which also displays an overlay of rendezvous data from the onboard digital computer, the crewmember would steer the Progress to mechanical contact by means of two hand controllers, one for rotation (RUO), the other for translation (RUD), on adjustable armrests. The controller-generated commands are transmitted from the SM's TORU control panel to the Progress via VHF radio. In addition to the Simvol-Ts color monitor, range, range rate (approach velocity) and relative angular position data are displayed on the “Klest-M” video monitor (VKU) which starts picking up signals from Progress when it is still approximately 9 km away. TORU is monitored in real time from TsUP over RGS (Russian Ground Sites) and via Ku-band from Houston, but its control cannot be taken over from the ground.]

CDR Burbank took ITCS (Internal Thermal Control Systems) samples from the Lab. One of these samples will be returned to ground on 28S in March. The other sample was taken for OPA (Ortho-phthalaldehyde) in-flight analysis and results were nominal. [Due to activities running long, ground teams deferred the JPM (JEM Pressurized Module) sampling until later in the week. Tomorrow, the crew will take ITCS samples from the COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Node 2 MTL (Moderate Temperature Loop) and LTL (Low Temperature Loop), and Node 3.]

Over the weekend, Dan took photos from the Node-3/Cupola of the SSRMS LEE (Space Station Remote Manipulator System Latching End Effector) snare cables. The ground team will review these photos to determine the condition of the LEE Snare cable strands and identify any damage of individual strand wires.

The crew reported the PWD (Potable Water Dispenser) beverage adapter was sticking and then cleaned and lubricated the adapter. Afterwards, it was no longer dispensing water. The crew provided photos for ground review. The photos showed that the microswitch is damaged. There are no spare microswitches on-orbit. Ground engineers are discussing options for PWD troubleshooting and recovery.

FE-2 performed the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

Anatoly also took care of the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

FE-2 Ivanishin broke out and set up the equipment for another session with the Russian crew health monitoring program's medical assessment MO-9/Biochemical Urinalysis, scheduled tomorrow. [MO-9 is conducted every 30 days (and also before and after EVAs) and is one of five nominal Russian medical tests adopted by NASA for U.S. crewmembers for IMG PHS (Integrated Medical Group/Periodic Health Status) evaluation as part of the "PHS/Without Blood Labs" exam, also conducted today. The analysis uses the sophisticated in-vitro diagnostic apparatus Urolux developed originally by Boehringer (Mannheim/Germany) for the Mir program. Afterwards, the data are entered in the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer)’s /special IFEP software (In-Flight Examination Program).]

FE-1 Shkaplerov performed his 6th collection session for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie (“Interactions”) program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. [The software has a “mood” questionnaire, a “group & work environment” questionnaire, and a “critical incidents” log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
01/24/12 -- Chibis-M deploy (6:19pm)
01/24/12 -- Progress 45P deorbit (burn start: 9:25pm)
01/25/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch (6:06 pm)
01/27/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1) (~7:09 pm)
02/16/12 -- Russian EVA-30
03/09/12 -- ATV3 launch --- (target date)
xx/xx/12 -- SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon launch
xx/xx/12 -- SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon berthing
xx/xx/12 -- SpaceX Falcon 9/Dragon unberth
03/16/12-- Soyuz TMA-22/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Volkov --- (Target Date)
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S docking (MRM2) --- (Target Date)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
TBD -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – launch on Proton (under review)
04/24/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P undock
04/25/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P launch
04/27/12 -- Progress M-15M/47P docking
TBD -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) – docking (under review)
05/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
06/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/28/12 – Soyuz TMA-06M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/12/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/26/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/28/12 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/19/13 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/02/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S launch – P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
04/04/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/16/13 – Soyuz TMA-07M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S launch – M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/31/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S launch – M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S launch – K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 – Soyuz TMA-10M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------